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Full text of "Spalding's base ball guide, and official league book for ... : a complete hand book of the national game of base ball .."

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, Group I., 



MARCH. 190 9 

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PUBLISHED BY 

RIHERlGfiH SPORTS PUBLISHING CO., 

21 Warren Street, New York City. 



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llilili 




A.G.Spalding & Bros. 

MAINTAIN THEIR OWN HOUSES 
_ FOR DISTRIBUTING THE 

Spalding 

^^ COMPLETE LINE OF 

Athletic Goods 

IN THE FOLLOWING CITIES 







NEW YORK 

Downtown— 

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228 Clarence Street 

COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTED 'j. ) A. O. SPALDING ft BHOS., AT 

ANY OF THE ABOVE ADDRESSES, WILL RECEIVE 

PROMPT ATTENTION. 



I ■ 




THE SPALDING TRADE-MARK IS THE 
FOUNDATION OF THE SPALDING BUSINESS 



Spalding's 
Athletic Library 

Anticipating the present ten- 
dency of the American people 
toward a healthful method of living 
and enjoyment, Spalding's Athletic 
Library was established in 1892 for 
the purpose of encouraging ath- 
letics in every form, not only by 
publishing the official rules and 
records pertaining to the various 
pastimes, but also by instructing, 
until to-day Spalding's Athletic 
Library is unique in its own par- 
ticular field and has been conceded 
the greatest educational series on 
athletic and physical training sub- 
jects that has ever been compiled. 
The publication of a distinct 
series of books devoted to athletic 
sports and pastimes and designed 
to occupy the premier place in 
America in its class was an early 
idea of Mr. A. G. Spalding, who 
was one of the first in America 
to publish a handbook devoted to 
athletic sports, Spalding's Official 
Base Ball Guide being the initial 
number, which was followed at intervals with other handbooks on the 
sports prominent in the '70s. 

Spalding's Athletic Library has had the advice and counsel of Mr. A. G. 
Spalding in all of its undertakings, and particularly in all books devoted 
to the national game. This applies especially to Spalding's Official 
Base Ball Guide and Spalding's Official Base Ball Record, both of which 
receive the personal attention of Mr. A. G. Spalding, owing to his early 
connection with the game as the leading pitcher of the champion Boston 
and Chicago teams of 1872-76. His interest does not stop, however, with 
matters pertaining to base ball; there is not a sport that Mr. Spalding 
does not make it his business to become familiar with, and that the 
Library will always maintain its premier place, with Mr. Spalding's able 
counsel at hand, goes without saying. 

The entire series since the issue of the first number has been under 
fie direct personal supervision of Mr. James E. Sullivan, President 
of the American Sports Publishing Company, and the total series of 
consecutive numbers reach an aggregate of considerably over three 
hundred, included in which are many "annuals," that really constitute 
the history of their particular sport in America year by year, back copies 
of which are even now eagerly sought for, constituting as they do the 
really first authentic records of events and official rules that have ever 
been consecutively compiled. 

When Spalding's Athletic Library was founded, seventeen years ago, 
track and field athletics were practically unknown outside the larger 
colleges and a few athletic clubs in the leading cities, which gave occa- 
sional meets, when an entry list of 250 competitors was a subject of com- 
ment; golf was known only by a comparatively few persons; lawn tennis 
had some vogue and base ball was practically the only established field 




Spalding 



EDITORS OF SPALDING' S ATHLETIC LIBRARY 

sport, and that in a professional way; basket ball had just been invented; 
athletics for the schoolboy— and schoolgirl— were almost unknown, and 
an advocate of class contests in athletics in the schools could not get a 
hearing. To-day we find the greatest body of athletes in the world is 
the Public Schools Athletic League of Greater New York, which has had 
an entry list at its annual games of over two thousand, and in whose 
' 'elementary series" in base ball last year 106 schools competed for the 
trophy emblematic of the championship. 

While Spalding's Athletic Library cannot claim that the rapid growth 
of athletics in this country is due to it solely, the fact cannot be denied 
that the books have had a great deal to do with its encouragement, by 
printing the official rules and instructions for playing the various games 
at a nominal price, within the reach of everyone, with the sole object 
that its series might be complete and the one place where a person 
could look with absolute certainty for the particular book in which he 
might be interested. 

In selecting the editors and writers for the various books, the lead- 
ing authority in his particular line has been obtained, with the result 
that no collection of books on athletic subjects can compare with 
Spalding's Athletic Library for the prominence of the various authors 
and their ability to present their subjects in a thorough and practical 
manner. 

A short sketch of a few of those who have edited some of the lead- 
ing numbers of Spalding's Athletic Library is given herewith: 



JAMES E. SULLIVAN 

President American Sports Publishing Com- 
pany; entered the publishing house of Frank 
Leslie in 1878, and has been connected continu- 
ously with the publishing- business since then 
and also as athletic editor of various New 
York papers; was a competing athlete; one of 
the organizers of the Amateur Athletic Union 
of the United States; has been actively on its 
board of governors since its organization until 
the present time, and President for two suc- 
cessive terms; has attended every champion- 
ship meeting in America since 1879 and has officiated in some capacity in 
connection with American amateur championships track and field games 
for nearly twenty-five years; assistant American director Olympic Games, 
Paris, 1900; director Pan-American Exposition athletic department, 1901; 
©hief department physical culture Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. 
Louis, 1904; secretary American Committee Olympic Games, at Athens, 
1906; honorary director of Athletics at Jamestown Exposition, 1907; secre- 
tary American Committee Olympic Games, at London, 1908; member of 
the Pastime A. C, New York: honorary member Missouri A. C, St. Louis; 
honorary member Olympic A. C, San Francisco; ex-president Pastime 
A. C, New Jersey A. C, Knickerbocker A. C; president Metropolitan 
Association of the A. A. U. for fifteen years; president Outdoor Recrea- 
tion League; with Dr. Luther H. Gulick organized the Public Schools 
Athletic League of New York, and is now chairman of its games commit- 
tee and member executive committee; was a pioneer in playground work 
and one of the organizers of the Outdoor Recreation League of New York; 
appointed by President Roosevelt as special commissioner to the Olympic 
Games at Athens, 1906, and decorated by King George I. of the Hellenes 
(Greece) for his services in connection with the Olympic. Games; ap- 
pointed special commissioner by President Roosevelt to the Olympic 
Games at London, 1908; appointed by Mayor McClellan, 1908, as member 
of the Board of Education of Greater New York. 




EDITORS OF SPALDING'S ATHLETIC LIBRARY 




WALTER CAMP 

For quarter of a century Mr. Walter Camp 
of Yale has occupied a leading position in col- 
lege athletics. It is immaterial what organiza- 
tion is suggested for college athletics, or for 
the betterment of conditions, insofar as college 
athletics is concerned, Mr. Camp has always 
played an important part in its conferences, 
and the great interest in and high plane of 
college sport to-day, are undoubtedly due more 
to Mr. Camp than to any other individual. Mr. 
Camp has probably written more on college 
athletics than any other writer and the leading papers and maga- 
zines of America are always anxious to secure his expert opinion on foot, 
ball, track and field athletics, base ball and rowing. Mr. Camp has grown 
up with Yale athletics and is a part of Yale's remarkable athletic system. 
While he has been designated as the "Father of Foot Ball," it is a well 
known fact that during his college career Mr. Camp was regarded as one 
of the best players that ever represented Yale on the base ball field, so 
when we hear of Walter Camp as a foot ball expert we must also remem- 
ber his remarkable knowledge of the game of base ball, of which he is a 
great admirer. Mr. Camp has edited Spalding's Official Foot Ball Guide 
since it was first published, and also the Spalding Athletic Library book 
on How to Play Foot Ball. There is certainly no man in American college 
life better qualified to write for Spalding's Athletic Library than Mr. 
Camp. 



DR. LUTHER HALSEY GULICK 

The leading exponent of physical training 
in America; one who has worked hard to im- 
press the value of physical training in the 
schools; when physical training was combined 
with education at the St. Louis Exposition in 
1904 Dr. Gulick played an important part in 
that congress; he received several awards for 
his good work and had many honors conferred 
upon him; he is the author of a great many 
books on the subject; it was Dr. Gulick, who„ 
acting on the suggestion of James E. Sullivan, 
organized the Public Schools Athletic League of Greater New York, and 
was its first Secretary; Dr. Gulick was also for several years Director of 
Physical Training in the public schools of Greater New York, resigning 
the position to assume the Presidency of the Playground Association of 
America. Dr. Gulick is an authority on all subjects pertaining to phys- 
ical training and the study of the child. 





JOHN B. FOSTER 

Successor to the late Henry Chadwick 
("Father of Base Ball") as editor of Spald- 
ing's Official Base Ball Guide; sporting editor 
of the New York Evening Telegram; has 
been in the newspaper business for many 
years and is recognized throughout America 
as a leading writer on the national game; a 
staunch supporter of organized base ball, 
his pen has always been used for the better- 
ment of the game. 



EDITORS OF SPALDING S ATHLETIC LIBRARY 




TIM MURNANE 

Base Ball editor of the Boston Globe and 
President of the New England League of 
Base Ball Clubs; one of the best known base 
ball men of the country; known from coast 
to coast; is a keen follower of the game and 
prominent in all f its councils; nearly half a 
century ago was one of America's foremost 
players: knows the game thoroughly and 
writes from the point of view both of player 
and an official. 




HARRY PHILIP BURCHELL 

Sporting editor of the New York Times; 
graduate of the University of Pennsylvania; 
editor of Spalding's Official Lawn Tennis 
Annual; is an authority on the game; follows 
the movements of the players minutely and 
understands not only tennis but all other sub- 
jects that can be classed as athletics; no one 
is better qualified to edit this book than Mr. 
Burchell. 



GEORGE T. HEPBRON 

Former Young Men's Christian Association 
director; for many years an official of the 
Athletic League of Young Men's Christiar. 
Associations of North America ; was con- 
nected with Dr. Luther H. Gulick in Young 
Men's Christian Association work for over 
twelve years; became identified with basket 
ball when it was in its infancy and has fol- 
lowed it since, being recognized as the lead- 
ing exponent of the official rules; succeeded 
Dr. Gulick as editor of the Official Basket Ball 

Guide and also editor of the Spalding Athletic Library book on How to 

Play Basket Ball. 





JAMES S. MITCHEL 

Former champion weight thrower; holdei 
of numerous records, and is the winner of 
more championships than any other individual 
in the history of sport ; Mr. Mitchel is a close 
student of athletics and well qualified to write 
upon any topic connected with athletic sport ; 
has been for years on the staff of the New 
York Sun. 



EDITORS OF SPALDING'S ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



MICHAEL C. MURPHY 

The world's most famous athletic trainer; 
the champion athletes that he has developed 
for track and field sports, foot ball and base ball 
fields, would run into thousands; he became 
famous when at Yale University and has 
been particularly successful in developing 
what might be termed championship teams; 
his rare good judgment has placed him in an 
enviable position in the athletic world; now 
with the University of Pennsylvania ; dur- 
ing his career has trained only at two col- 
leges and one athletic club, Yale and the 
University of Pennsylvania and Detroit Athletic Club; his most recent 
triumph was that of training the famous American team of athletes 
that swept the field at the Olympic Games of 1908 at London. 





DR. C. WARD CRAMPTON 

Succeeded Dr. Gulick as director of physical 
training in the schools of Greater New York : 
as secretary of the Public Schools Athletic 
League is at the head of the most remarkable 
organization of its kind in the world; is a 
practical athlete and gymnast himself, and 
has been for years connected with the physi- 
cal training system in the schools of Greater 
New York, having had charge of the High 
School of Commerce. 




DR. GEORGE J. FISHER 

Has been connected with Y. M. C. A. work 
for many years as physical director at Cincin- 
nati and Brooklyn, where he made such a high 
reputation as organizer that he was chosen to 
succeed Dr. Luther H. Gulick as Secretary of 
the Athletic League of Y. M. C. A.'s of North 
America, when the latter resigned to take 
charge of the physical training in the Public 
Schools of Greater New York. 



DR. GEORGE ORTON 

On athletics, college athletics, particularly 
track and field, foot ball, soccer foot ball, and 
training of the youth, it would be hard to find 
one better qualified than Dr. Orton; has had 
the necessary athletic experience and the 
ability to impart that experience intelligently 
to the youth of the land; for years was the 
American, British and Canadian champion 
runner. 



EDITORS OF SPALDING'S ATHLETIC LIBRARY 








FREDERICK R. TOOMBS 

A well known authority on skating, rowing:, 
boxing:, racquets, and other athletic sports; 
was sporting: editor of American Press Asso- 
ciation, New York ; dramatic editor; is a law- 
yer and has served several terms as a member 
of Assembly of the Legislature of the State of 
New York; has written several novels and 
historical works. 



R. L. WELCH 

A resident of Chicago; the popularity of 
indoor base ball is chiefly due to his efforts; 
a player himself of no mean ability; a first- 
class organizer; he has followed the game of 
indoor base ball from its inception. 



DR. HENRY S. ANDERSON 

Has been connected with Yale University 
for years and is a recognized authority on 
gymnastics; is admitted to be one of the lead- 
ing authorities in America on gymnastic sub- 
jects; is the author of many books on physical 
training. 



CHARLES M. DANIELS 

Just the man to write an authoritative 
book on swimming; the fastest swimmer the 
world has ever known; member New York 
Athletic Club swimming team and an Olym- 
pic champion at Athens in 1906 and London, 
1908. In his book on Swimming, Champion 
Daniels describes just the methods one must 
use to become an expert swimmer. 

GUSTAVE BOJUS 

Mr. Bojus is most thoroughly qualified to 
write intelligently on all subjects pertaining 
to gymnastics and athletics; in his day one 
of America's most famous amateur athletes; 
has competed successfully in gymnastics and 
many other sports for the New York Turn 
Verein; for twenty years he has been prom- 
inent in teaching gymnastics and athletics; 
was responsible for the famous gymnastic 
championship teams of Columbia University; 
now with the Jersey City high schools. 



EDITORS OF SPALDING'S ATHLETIC LIBRARY 








CHARLES JACOBUS 

Admitted to be the "Father of Roque;" 
one of America's most expert players, win- 
ning 1 the Olympic Championship at St. Louis 
in 1904; an ardent supporter of the game 
and follows it minutely, and much of the 
success of roque is due to his untiring- efforts; 
certainly there is no one better qualified to 
write on this subject than Mr. Jacobus. 



DR. E. B. WARMAN 

Well known as a physical training expert; 
was probably one of the first to enter the field 
and is the author of many books on the sub- 
ject; lectures extensively, each year all over 
the country. 



W. J. CROMIE 

Now with the University of Pennsylvania; 
was formerly a Y. M. C. A. physical director; 
a keen student of all gymnastic matters; the 
author of many books on subjects pertaining 
to physical training. 



G. M. MARTIN 

By profession a physical director of the 
Young Men's Christian Association; a close 
student of all things gymnastic, and games 
for the classes in the gymnasium or clubs. 



PROF. SENAC 

A leader in the fencing world ; has main- 
tained a fencing school in New York for 
years and developed a great many cham- 
pions ; understands the science of fencing 
thoroughly and the benefits to be derived 
therefrom. 



SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 

Qt Giving the Titles of all Spalding Athletic Library Books now £) 
J v i n print, grouped fo r ready reference / -*J 

V' ~ ~dc 

SPALDING OFFICIAL ANNUALS 



No. I Spalding's Official 

No. IA Spalding's Official 

No. 2 Spalding's Official 

2A Spalding's Official 

3 Spalding's Official 

4 Spalding's Official 

5 Spalding's Official 

6 Spalding's Official 

7 Spalding's Official 

8 Spalding's Official 

9 Spalding's Official 
IO Spalding's Official 
12 SpaldLng's Official 

I. Base Ball 

Spalding's Official Base Ball 

Guide. 
How to Play Base Ball. 
How to Bat. 
How to Run Bases. 
How to Pitch. 
How to Catch. 
How to Play First Base. 
How to Play Second Base. 
How to Play Third Base. 
How to Play Shortstop. 
How to Play the Outfield. 
How to Organize a Base Ball 
Club. [League. 

How to Organize a Base Ball 
How to Manage a Base Ball 

Club. 
How toTrain a Base Ball Team 
How to Captain a Base Ball 
How toUmpire a Game. [Team 
Technical Base Ball Terms. 
No. 219. Ready Reckoner of Base Ball 
Percentages. 
BASE BALL AUXILIARIES 
No. IA Official Base Ball Record. • 
No. 319. *Minor League Base Ball Guide 
No. 320. *Official Book National League 

of Prof. Base Ball Clubs. 
No. 306 Official Handbook National 

Playground Ball Assn. 
•Published in April, 1909. 

Group II. Foot Ball 

No. 2 Spalding's Official Foot Ball 

Guide. 
No. 315 How to Play Foot Ball. 
No. 2A Spalding's Official Soccer Foot 

Ball Guide. 
No. 286 How to Play Soccer. 



No 

No 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No, 

No. 

No. 

No. 

Group 

No. 1 

No. 202 
No. 223 
No. 232 
No. 230 
No. 229 
No. 225 
No. 226 
No. 227 
No. 228 
No. 224 



No. 
231. 



Base Ball Guide 

Base Ball Record 

Foot Ball Guide 

Soccer Foot Ball Guide 

Cricket Guide 

Lawn Tennis Annual 

Golf Guide 

Ice Hockey Guide 

Basket Ball Guide 

Bowling Guide 

Indoor Base Ball Guide 

Roller Polo Guide 

Athletic Almanac 

FOOT BALL AUXILIARY 

No. 303 Spalding's Official Canadian 

Foot Ball Guide. 

Group III. Cricke! 

No. 3 Spalding' s Official Cricket Guide. 
No. 277 Cricket and How to Play It. 



Group IV. Lawn Tennis 

No. 4 Spalding's Official Lawn Ten- 
nis Annual. 

No. 157 How to Play Lawn Tennis. 

No. 279 Strokes and Science of Lawn 
Tennis. 

Group V. Golf 

No. 5 Spalding's Official Golf Guide. 
No. 276 How to Play Golf. 

Group VI. flockeg 

No. 6 Spalding's Official Ice Hockey 

Guide. 
No. 304 How to Play Ice Hockey. 
No. 154 Field Hockey. 
(Lawn Hockey. 
No. 188 < Parlor Hockey. 

(Garden Hockey. 
No. 180 Ring Hockey. 

HOCKEY AUXILIARY 
No. 256 Official Handbook Ontario 
Hockey Association. 

Group vil. Basket Ball 

No. 7 Spalding's Official Basket Ball 

Guide. 
No. 193 How to Play Basket Ball. 
No. 318 Basket Ball Guide for Women. 

BASKET BALL AUXILIARY 
No. 312 Official Collegiate Basket Ball 

Handbook. 



ANY OF THE ABOVE BOOKS MAILED POSTPAID UPON RECEIPT OF 10 CENTS 



<^ \ SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY f j* 

^- — -OG- ' 



Group VIII. Bowling 

No. 8 Spalding's Official Bowling 

Group IX. indoor Base Ball 

No. 9 Spalding's Official Indoor 

JJasc Ball (J aide. 

croup X. Polo 

No. 10 Spalding's Official Roller Polo 

Guide. 
No. 129 Water Polo. 
No. 199 Equestrian Polo. 

Group XL Miscellaneous Games 

No. 201 Lacrosse. 

No. 305 Official Handbook U. S. Inter- 
collegiate Lacrosse League. 

Archery. 

Croquet. 

Roque. 
(Racquets. 
No. 194 -< Squash-Racquets. 

(Court Tennis. 
No. 13 Hand Ball. 

Quoits. 

Push Ball. 

Curling, 

Lawn Bowls. 

Lawn Games. 

Children's Games. 

Croup Xll. Athletics 

No. 12 Spalding's Official Athletic 
Almanac. 
College Athletics. 
All Around Athletics. 
Athletes' Guide. 
Athletic Primer. 
No. 273 Olympic Game sat Athens, 1906 
No. 252 How to Sprint. 

How to Run 100 Yards. 
Distance and Cross Country 
Running. [Thrower. 

How to Become a Weight 
Official Sporting Rules, [boys. 
Athletic Training for School- 
ATHLETIG AUXILIARIES 
No. 311 Amateur Athletic Union Offi- 
cial Handbook. [book. 
Intercollegiate Official Hand- 
Y. M. C. A. Official Handbook. 
Public Schools Athletic 
League Official Handbook. 
No. 314 Public Schools Athletic 
League Official Handbook 
— Girls' Branch. 
No. 316 Intercollegiate Cross Country 

Association Handbook. 
No. 308 Official Handbook New York 
Interscholastic Athletic 
Association. 
No. 317 Marathon Running. 



No. 248 
No. 138 
No. 271 



No. 167 
No. 170 
No. 14 
No. 207 
No. 188 
No. 189 



No. 27 
No. 182 
No. 156 

No. 87 



No. 255 
No. 174 

No. 259 
No. 55 
No. 246 



No. 307 
No. 302 
No. 313 



Group Xlll. 



Ainieflc 

Accomplishments 



No. 177 How to Swim. 

No. 296 Speed Swimming. 

No. 128 How to Row. 

No. 209 How to Become a Skater. 

No. 178 How to Train for Bicycling. 

No. 23 Canoeing. 

No. 282 Roller Skating Guide. 



Group xiv. 



Manly Sports 

( By Breck.) 



No. 18 Fencing. 

No. 162 Boxing. 

No. 165 Fencing. (BySenac.) 

No. 140 Wrestling. 

No. 236 How to Wrestle. 

No. 102 Ground Tumbling. 

No. 233 Jiu Jitsu. 

No. 166 How to Swing Indian Clubs. 

No. 200 Dumb Bell Exercises. 

No. 143 Indian Clubs and Dumb Bells. 

No. 262 Medicine Ball Exercises. 

No. 29 Pulley Weight Exercises. 

No. 191 How to Punch the Bag. 

No. 289 Tumbling for Amateurs. 

Group XV. Gymnastics 

No. 104 Grading of Gymnastic Exer- 
cises. 

No. 214 Graded Calisthenics and 
Dumb Bell Drills. 

No. 254 Barnjum Bar Bell Drill. 

No. 158 Indoor and Outdoor Gym- 
nastic Games. 

No. 124 How to Become a Gymnast. 

No. 287 Fancy Dumb Bell and March- 
ing Drills. 

Group xvi. Physical culture 

No. 161 Ten Minutes' Exercise for 
Busy Men. 

No. 208 Physical Education and Hy- 
giene. 

No. 149 Scientific Physical Training 
and Care of the Body. 

No. 142 Physical Training Simplified. 

No. 185 Hints on Health. 

No. 213 285 Health Answers. 

No. 238 Muscle Building. 

No. 234 School Tactics and Maze Run- 
ning. 

No. 261 Tensing Exercises. 

No. 285 Health by Muscular Gym- 
No. 288 Indigestion Treated by Gym- 
nastics. 

No. 290 Get Well ; Keep Well. 



ANY OF THE ABOVE BOOKS MAILED POSTPAID UPON RECEIPT OF 10 CENTS 



SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



Group I. Base Ball 

No. 1— Spalding's Official 
Base Ball Guide. 

The leading: Base Ball 

I annual of the country, and 
the official authority of 
the game. Contains the 
official playing rules, with 
an explanatory index of the 
rules compiled by Mr. A. G. 
j| Spalding; pictures of all 
" the teams in the National, 
American and minor leagues : re- 
views of the season; college Base Ball, 
and a great deal of interesting in- 
formation. Price 10 cents. 

No. 2i)2— Ho vt to Play Bate 
Ball. 

Edited by Tim Murnane. New and 
revised edition. Illustrated with pic- 
tures showing how all the various 
curves and drops are thrown and por- 
traits of leading players. Price 10 cents. 
No. 223— How to Bat. 

There is no better way of becoming 
a proticient batter than by reading this 
book and practising the directions. 
Numerous illustrations. Price 10 cents. 

No. 232— How to Ran the 

Bases. 

This book gives clear and concise 
directions for excelling as a base run- 
ner; tells when to run and when not to 
do so; how and when to slide: team 
work on the ba& ,-s; in fact, every point 
of the game is thoroughly explained. 
Illustrated. Price 10 cents. 
No. 230— How to Pitch. 

Anew, up-to-date book. Its contents 
are the practical teaching of men who 
have reached the top as pitchers, and 
who kndw how to impart a knowledge 
of their art. All the big leagues' 
pitchers are shown. Price 10 cents. 

I NO. 229— How to Catch. 

Every boy who has hopes of being a 
clever catcher should read how well- 
known players cover their position. 
Pictures of all the noted catchers in 
the big leagues. Price 10 cents. 
No. 225— How to Play First 
Base. 

Illustrated with pictures of all the 
prominent first basemen. Price 10 cents. 

No. >: 226— How to Play Second 
. Base, 

The ideas of the best second basemen 
have been incorporated in this book for 
the especial benefit of boys who want 
to know the fine points of play at this 
point of the diamond. Price 10 cents. 
No. 227— How to Play Third 
Base. 

Third base is, in some respects, the 
most important of the infield. All the 
points explained. Price 10 cents. 
No. 22S— How to Play Short- 
stop. 

Shortstop is one of the hardest posi- 
tions on the infield to fill, and quick 
thought and quick action are necessary 
for a player who expects to make good 
as a shortstop. Illus. Price 10 cents. 

No. 224— How to Play the 
Ontfleld. 

An invaluable guide for the out- 
fielder. Price 10 cents 
No. 231-i-How to Coach; How 
to Captain a Team; How 
to Manage a Team; How 
to Umpire; How to Or- 
eanlze a; Lea&ue; Tech- 
nical Terms of Base Ball. 
A useful guide. Price 10 cents. 



No 219 — Ready Reckoner of 
Base Ball Percentages. 

To supply a demand for a book which 
would show the percentage of clubs 
without recOurseto thearduous work of 
figuring, the publishers had these tables 
compiled by an expert. Price 10 cents. 
BASE BALL, AUXILIARIES. 
No. 1A — Spalding's Official 
Base Ball Record. 

Something new in Base Ball. Con- 
tains records of all kinds from the be- 
ginning of the National League and 
official averages of all professional or- 
ganizations for past season. 10 cents. 
No. 3^11*— Minor League Base 
Ball Guide. 

The minors' own guide. Edited by 
President T. H. Murnane, of the New 
England League. Price 10 cents. 

No. 320^- Official Handbook 
of the National League 
of Professional Base Ball 
Clubs 

Contains Ihe Constitution, By-Laws. 
Official Rules, Averages, and schedule 
of the National League for the current 
year, together with list of club officers 
and reports of the annual meetings of 
the League. Price 10 cents. 
No. 306— Official Handbook 

National Playground Ball 

Association. 
This game is specially adapted for 
playe-rounds, parks, etc., is spreading 
rapidly. The book contains a descrip- 
tion of the game, r-"'«s and officers 
Price 10ceii.s 

Group II. Foot Ball 

No. 2— Spalding's Official 
Foot Ball Guide. 

Edited by Walter Camp. 
Contains the new rules, 
with diagram of field; All- 
America teams as selected 
by the leading authorities: 
reviews of the game from 
various sections of the 
country: scores: pictures. 
Price 10 cents. 



Edited by Walter Camp, of Yale. 
Everything that a beginner wants to 
know and many points that an expert 
will be glad to learn. Snapshots of 
leading teams and players in action, 
with comments by Walter Camp. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 2A— Spalding's Official 
Association Soccer Foot 
Ball Gnide. 

A complete and up-to-B 
date guide to the "Soccer" fc 
game in the United States, k 
containing instructions for I 
playing the game, official H 
rules, and interesting! 
news from all parts of theH 
country. Illustrated. Price | 
10 cents. 

No. 2SG— How to Play Soc- 
cer. 

How each position should be played, 
written by the best player in England 
in hi3 respective position, and illus- 
trated with full-page photographs of 
players in action. Price 10 cents. 
FOOT BALL AUXILIARIES. 
No. 303— Spalding's Official 
Canadian Foot Ball 

Guide. 
The official book of the game in Can- 
ada. Price 10 cents. 



Group in. Cricket 



Official 

The most complete year 
book of the game that has 
ever been published in 
America. Reports of 
special matches, official 
rules and pictures of all 
the leading teams. Price 
10 cents. 



No. 277— Cricket; and How 
to Play it. 

By Prince Ranjitsinhji. The game 
described concisely and illustrated with 
full-page pictures posed especially for 
this book. Price 10 cents. 




Group IV. 



Lawn 
Tennis 




Contents include reports 
of all important tourna- 
ments: official ranking 
from 1885 to date; laws of 
lawn tennis; instructions 
for handicapping; deci- 
sions on doubtful points; 
management of tourna- 

ments; directory of clubs; 

laying out and keeping a court. Illus- 
trated. Price 10 cents. 

o. 157— How to Play Lawn 
Tennis. 

A complete description of lawn ten- 
nis: a lesson for beginners and direc- 
tions telling how to make the most im- 
portant strokes. Illustrated. Price 
10 cents. 



By P. A. Vaile, a leading authority 
on the game in Great Britain. Every 
stroke in the game is accurately illus- 
trated and analyzed by the author. 
Price 10 cents. 



Group V. 



Golf 




No. 5— Spalding's 
Golf Guide. 

Contains records of all 
important tournaments, 
articles on the game in 
various sections of the 
country, picturesof prom- 
inent players, official play- 
ing rules and general 
items of interest. Price 
10 cents. 

No. 27G— How to Play Golf. 

By James Braid and Harry Vardon. 
the world's two greatest players tell 
how they play the game, with numer- 
ous full-page pictures of them taken 
on the links. Price 10 cents. 

Group VI. Hockey 

»• G— Spalding's Official Ice 
Hockey Guide. 

The official year book of 
the game. Contains the 
I official rules, pictures of 
I leading teams and players. 
I records, review of the 
I season, reports from dif- 
1 ferent sections of the* 
United States and Canada.' 
' Price 10 cents. 




SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



No. 304— Hoy* to Piny Ice 
Hockey. 

Contains a description of the duties 
of each player. Illustrated. Price 10 
cents. 

No. 154— Field Hockey. 

Prominent in the sports at Vassar. 
Smith. Wellesley. Bryn Mawr and other 
leading colleges. Price 10 cent*. 

No. lKM-Lairn Hockey. 
Parlor Hockey, Garden 
Hockey. ' 

Containing the rules for each game. 
Illustrated. Price 10 cents. 

No. ISO— Ring: Hockey. 

A new game for the gymnasium. 
Exciting as basket ball. Price 10 cents. 

HOCKEY AUXILIARY. 
No. 25G— Official Handbook 
of the Ontario Hockey 

Association. 
Contains the official rules of the 
Association, constitution, rules of com- 
petition, list of officers, and pictures of 
leading players. Price 10 cents. 



. ___ Basket 
Group V1L Ball 

No. 7— Spalding's Official 
Basket Ball Guide. 

Edited by George T. 
Hepbron. Contains the 
revised official rules, de- 
cisions on disputed points, 
records of prominent 
teams, reports on the game 
from various parts of the 
country. Illustrated. Price 
10 cents. 

No. 193— How to Play Basket 
Ball. 

"By G. T. Hepbron, editor of the 
Official Basket Ball Guide. Illustrated 
with scenes of action. Price 10 cents. 

No. 318- Official Basket Ball 
Guide for Women. 

Edited by Miss Senda Berenson. of 
Smith College. Contains the official 
playing rules and special articles on 
the game by prominent authorities. 
Illustrated. Price 10 cents. 

BASKET BALL. AUXILIARY. 
No. 312— Collegiate Basket 
Ball Handbook. 

The official publication of the Colle- 
giate Basket Ball Association. Con- 
tains the official rules, records, All- 
America selections, reviews, and pic- 
tures. Edited by H. A. Fisher, of 
Columbia. Price 10 cents. 




Group IX. 



Indoor 
Base Ball 



Polo 




America's national game | 
is now vieing with othei 
indoor games as a winter | 
pastime. This book < 
tains the playing rules, I 
pictures of leading teams. I 
and interesting articles on | 
the game by leading au- F 
thorities on the subject. 
Price 10 cents. 



Group X. 

Xo. 1<>— Spalding's 
Official Roller 
Polo Guide. 

Edited by J. C. Morse 
A full description of the 
game; official rules, re- 
cords: pictures of promi-l 
nent players. Price 1C cents! 

Xo. 129— Water Polo. 

The contents of this book treat of 
every detail, the individual work of the 
players, the practice of the team, how 
to throw the ball, with illustrations and 
many valuable hints. Price 10 cents. 

Xo. 199— fequestrlnn Polo. 

Compiled by H. L. Fitzpatrick of the 
New York Sun. Illustrated with por- 
traits of leading players, and contains 
most useful information for polo play- 
ers. Price 10 cents. 



- ___ Miscellane- 
GroupXI. ous Games 

Xo. 201— Lacrosse. 

Every position is thoroughly ex- 
plained in a most simple and concise 
manner, rendering it the best manual 
of the game ever published. Illus- 
trated with numerous snapshots of im- 
portant plays. Price 10 cents. 

Xo. 305— Official Handbook 
U. S. Inter-Collegiate La- 
crosse . Leugue. 

Contains the constitution, by-laws, 
playing rules, list of officers and records 
of the association. Price 10 cents. 

Xo. 271— Spalding's Official 
Roque Guide. 

The official publication of the Na- 
tional Roque Association of America. 
Contains a description of the courts 
and their construction, diagrams, illus- 
trations, rules and valuable informa- 
tion. Price 10 cents. 



j Xo. 13S— Spalding's Official 
| Croquet Guide 

I Contains directions for playing, dia- 
/"Imiin \7TTT Rnwlind grams of important strokes, description 
V71UUJJ Vlll. UUW 1111*5 of grounds, instructions for the betr in- 
ner, terms used in the game, and the 
official playing rules. Price 10 cents. 



Official 



>. S— Spalding'; 
Bowling Guide. 

The contents include: 
I diagrams of effective de- 
I liveries; hints to begin- 
I ners; how to score; official 
I rules; spares, how they 
I are made ; ru les for cock ed 
I hat, quintet, cocked hat 
I and feather, battle game, 
■ etc Price 10 cents. 




No. 24S— Archery. 

A new and up-to-date book on this 
fascinating pastime. The several 
varieties of archery; instructions for 
shooting; how to select implements; 
how to score: and a great deal of inter- 
esting information. Illustrated. Price 
10 cents. 



ills. 

How to play each game is thoroughly 
explained, and all the difficult stroke* 
shown by special photographs taken 
especially for this book. Contains the 
official rulea for each game. Price 10 
cents. 

Xo. 1G7— Qaolta, 

Contains a description of the plays 
used by experts and the official rules. 
Illustrated. Price 10 cents. 

No. 170— Push Ball. 

This book contains the official rules 
and a sketch of the game; illustrated.. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 13— How to Play Hand 
Ball. 

By the world's champion. Michael 
Egan. Every play is thoroughly ex- 
plained by text and diagram. Illus- 
trated. Price 10 cents. 

Xo. 14 — Curling. 

A short history of this famous Scot- 
tish pastime, with instructions for 
play, rules of the game, definitions of 
terms and diagrams of different shots. 
Price 10 cents. 

Xo. 207— Bowling on the 
Green; or, Lawn Bowls. 

How to construct a green: how to 
play the game, and the official rules 
of the Scottish Bowling Association. 
Illustrated. Price 10 cents. 

No. 1S9— Children's Games. 

These games are intended for use at 
recesses, and all but the team games 
have been adapted to large classes. 
Suitable for children from three to 
eight years, and include a great variety. 
Price 10 cents. 

Xo. 1SS— Lawn Games. 

Lawn Hockey, Garden Hockey, Hand 
Tennis, Tether Tennis; also Volley 
Ball, Parlor Hockey, Badminton, Bas- 
ket Goal. Price 10 cents. 

Group XII. Athletics 

No. 12— Spalding's Official 
Athletic Almanac. 

Compiled by J. E. Sulli- 
van, President of the Ama- 
teur Athletic Union. The | 
only annual publicatio 
now issued that contains | 
a complete list of amateur 
best-on-records; intercol- 
legiate, English, swim- | 

ming, interscholastic, Irish, Scotcn' 
Swedish, Continental. South African. 
Australasian; numerous photos of in- 
dividual athletes and leading athletic 
teams. Price 10 cents. 
No. 27— College Athletics. 

M. C. Murphy, the well-known ath- 
letic trainer, now with Pennsylvania, 
the author of this book, has written it 
especially for the schoolboy and college 
man, but it is invaluable for the athlete 
who wishes to excel in any branch of 
athletic sport; profusely illustrated. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. INS— Ail-Around Ath- 
letics. 

Gives in full the method of scoring 
the Ail-Around Championship; how to 
train for the All-Around Champion-, 
ship. Illustrated. Price 10 cents. 



SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



No. 1GU— Athlete's Guide. 

Full instructions for the beginner, 
telling how to sprint, hurdle, jump and 
throw weights, general hints on train- 
ing: valuable advice to beginners and 
important A. A. U. rules and their ex- 
planations, while the pictures comprise 
many scenes of champions in action. 
Price 10 cents. 



A complete account of the Orymcfc 
Game3 of 1906, at Athens, the greatest 
International AtHetic Contest erer 
held. Compiled by J. E. Sullivan, 
Special United States Commissioner to 
the Olympic Games. Price 10 cents. 

No. 87— Athletic Primer. 

Edited by J. E. Sullivan. President 
of the Amateur Athletic Union. Tells 
how to organize an athletic club, how 
to conduct an athletic meeting, and 
gives rules for the government of ath- 
letic meetings; contents also include 
directions for laying out athletic 
grounds, and a very instructive article 
on training. Price 10 cents. 

No. 232— How to Sprint. 

Every athlete who aspires to be a 



By J. W. Morton, the noted British 
champion. Many of Mr. Morton's 
methods of training are novel to 
American athletes, but his success is 
the best tribute to their worth. Illus- 
trated. Price 10 cent*. 

No. 174— Distance and Cross- 
country Running:. 

By George Orton, the famous Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania runner. The 
quarter, half, mile, the longer dis- 
tances, and cross-country running and 
steeplechasing. with instructions for 
training: pictures of leading athletes 
in action, with comments by the editor. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 259— Weight Throwing - . 

Probably no other man in the world 
has had the varied and long experience 
of James S. Mitchel, the author, in the 
weight throwing department of ath- 
letics. The hook gives valuable infor- 
mation not only for the novice, but for 
the expert as well. Price 10 cent3. 



By Geo. W. Orton. Each event in the 
intercollegiate programme is treated 
of separately. Price 10 cents. 



Contains rules not found in other 
publications for the government of 
many sports; rules for wrestling, 
ihuffleboard. snowshoeing, profes- 
sional racing, pigeon shooting, dog 
racing, pistol and revolver shooting. 
British water polo rules. Rugby foot 
^all rules. Price 10 cents. 



ATHLETIC AUXILIARIES. 
No. 311— Official Handbook 
of the A.A.U. 

The A. A U. is the governing body 
of athletes in the United States of 
America, and all games must be held 
under its rules, which are exclusively 
published in this handbook,-and a copy 
should be in the hands of every athlete 
and every club officer in America. 
Also includes a very interesting article 
on "The Growth of American Ath- 
letics," and a short history of each 
member of the Bt>ard of Governors. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 307— Official Intercolle- 
giate A.A.A.A. Handbook. 
Contains constitution, by-laws, and 
laws of athletics: records from 1S76 to 
date. Price 10 cents. 
No. . 308— Official Handbook 
New York Interschol- 
nxtlc Athletic Associa- 
tion. 
Contains the Association's records, 
constitution and by-laws and other 
Information. Price 10 cents; 



Contains the official rules governing 
all sports under the jurisdiction of the 
Y. M. C. A., official Y. M. C. A. scoring 
tables, pentathlon rules, pictures of 
leading Y. M. C. A. athletes. Price 
10 cents. 
No. 313— Official Handbook 

of the Public Schools 

Athletic League. 
Edited by Dr. Luther H&Jsey Gulick, 
director of physical education in .the 
New York public schools. Illustrated. 
Price 10 cents. 
No. 314 — Official Handbook 

Girls' Branch of the 

Public Schools Athletic 

League. 
The official publication. Contains: 
constitution and by-laws, list of offi- 
cers, donors, founders, life and annual 
members, reports and illustrations. 
Price 10 cents. 
No. 31G— Interco llegrlate 

Cross Country Handbook. 
Contains constitution and by-laws, 
list of officers, and records of the asso- 
ciation. Price 10 cents. 
No. 317— Marathon Running. 
A new and up-to-date book on this 
popular pastime. Contains pictures 
of the leading Marathon runners, 
methods of training, and best times 
made in various Marathon events. 
Price 10 cents. 

Group xm. Athletic 
Accomplishments 

Xo. 177— How tb Svrlm. 

Will interest the expert as well as 
the novice; the illustrations were made 
from photographs especially posed, 
showing the swimmer in clear water: 
a valuable feature is the series of 
"land drill " exercises for the beginner. 
Price 10 cents. 
No. ISS-How to Row. 

By E. J. Giannini, of the New York 
Athletic Club, one of America's most 
famous amateur oarsmen and cham- 
pions. Shows how to hold the oars. 
the finish of the stroke and other valu- 
able infoimation. Price 10 cents. 



No. 'JlHi— Speed Swimming. 

By Champion C. M. Daniels of tb* 
New York Athletic Club team, holder 
of numerous American records, and the 
best swimmer in America qualified to 
write on the subject. Any boy should 
be able to increase his speed in the 
water after reading Champion Daniels' 
nstructionB on the subject. Pries 10 
cents. 

No. 23 — Canoeing. 

Paddling, sailing, cruising and rac- 
ing canoes and their uses; with hints 
on rig and management; the choice of 
a canoe; sailing canoes, racing regula- 
tions; canoeing and camping. Fully 
illustrated. Price 10 cents. 

No. 200— How to Become a 
Skater. 

Contains advice for beginners; how 
to become a figure skater, showing how 
to do all the different tricks of the best 
figure skaters. Pictures of prominent 
skaters and numerous diagrams. Price 
10 cents. 

No. 282-Official Roller 
Skating Guide. 

Directions for becoming a fancy and 
trick roller skater, and rules for roller 
skating. Pictures of prominent trick 
skaters in action. Price 10 cents. 

No. 17S— How to Train for 
Bicycling. 

Gives methods of the best riders 
when training for long or short distance 
races; hints on training. Revised and 
up-to<late in every particular. Prico 
10 cents, 

__ y Manly 
Group XIV. sports 

No. 140— Wrestling-. 

Catch-as-catch-can style. Seventy 
illustrations of the different holds, pho- 
tographed especially and so described 
that anybody can with little effort learn 
every one. Price 10 cents. 

No. 18— Fencing. 

By Dr. Edward Breck. cf Boston, 
editor of The Swordsman, a promi- 
nent amateur fencer. A book that has 
stood the test of time, and is universally 
acknowledged to be a standard work. 
Illustrated. Price 10 cents. 

No. 10.2— 'Boxing Gnlde. 

Contains over 70 pages of illustrations 
showing .all the latest blows, posed 
especially for this book under the super- 
vision of a well-known instructor of 
boxing, who makes a specialty of teach- 
ing and knows how to impart hla 
knowledge. Price 10 cents. 

No. 1G5— The Art of Fencing 

By Regis and Louis Senac. of New 
York, famous instructors and leading 
authorities on the subject Gives in 
detail how every move should be made. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 236— How to Wrestle. 

The most complete and up-to-date 
book on wrestling ever published. 
Edited by F. R. Toombs, and devoted 
principally to special poses and illustra- 
tions by George Hackenschmidt. the 
" Russian Lion." Price 10 centa. 
No. 102— Ground Tumbling:. 

Any boy. by reading this book and 
following the instructions, can b 
proficient. Price 10 cent*. 



SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



No. ^Ml>— Turn bit n«r (or Ama- 
teurs. 

Specially compiled for amateurs by 
Dr.JamssT. Gwathmey. Every variety 
of the pastime explained by text and 
pictures, over 100 different positions 
being shown. Price 10 cents. 

.No. 191— Hott to Punch the 
Bag. 

The best treatise on bag punching 
that has ever been printed. Every va- 
riety of blow used in training is shown 
and explained, with a chapter on fancy 
bag punching by a well-known theatri- 
cal bag puncher. Price 10 cents. 

No. 143 — Indian Clubs and 

Dii nib-Dells. 
"By America's amateur champion club 
swinger. J. H. Dougherty. It is clearly 
illustrated, by which any novice can 
become an expert. Price 10 cents. 

No. 200— Dnmb-Belli. 

The best work on dumb-bells that 
has ever been offered. By Prof. G. 
Bojus, of New York. Contains 200 
photographs. Should be in the hands 
cf every teacher and pupil of physical 
culture, and is invaluable for home 
exercise. Price 10 cents. 

No. 262— Medicine Ball Ex- 
ercises. 

A series of plain and practical exer- 
cises with the medicine ball, suitable 
for boys and girls, business and profes- 
sional men, in and out of gymnasium. 
Price 10 cents. 

Xo. 29— Pulley Weight Exer- 
cises. 

By Dr. Henry S. Anderson, instructor 
in heavy gymnastics Yale gymnasium. 
In conjunction with a chest machine 
anyone with this book can become 
perfectly developed. Price 10 cents. 

No. 253— Jiu Jitsu. 

Each move thoroughly explained and 
illustrated with numerous full-page 
pictures of Messrs. A. Minami and K. 
Koyama. two of the most famous ex- 
ponents of the art of Jiu Jitsu, who 
posed especially for this book. Price 
10 cents. 



By Prof. E. B: Warman. By follow- 
ing the directions caref ully anyone can 
become an expert. Price 10 cents. 



Group XV. Gymnasties 

No. 104— The Grading: of 
Gymnastic Exercises. 
By G. M. Martin. A book that should 
be in the hands of every physical direc- 
tor of the Y. M. C. A. school, chib. ccf- 
ege. etc Price 10 cents. 



No. 214— Graded Calisthen- 
ics and Dumb-Bell Drills. 

For years it has been the custom in ' 
mont gymnasiums of memorizing a set 
drill, which was never varied. Conse- 
quently the beginner was given the 
same kind and amount as the older 
member. With a view to giving uni- 
formity the present treatise is at- 
tempted. Price 10-cents. 

No. 254— Barnjum Bar Bell 
Drill. 

Edited by Dr. R. Tait McKenzie. 
Director Physical Training, University 
of Pennsylvania. Profusely illustrated. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 158— Indoor and Outdoor 
Gymnastic Games. 

A book that will prove valuable to in- 
door and outdoor gymnasiums, schools, 
outings and gatherings where there 
are a number to be amused. Price 10 
cents. 

Xo. 124 — How to Become a 
Gymnast. 

By Robert Stoll. of ii.e New York 
A. C., the American champion on the 
flying rings from 1885 to 1892. Any boy 
can easily become proficient with a 
little practice. Price 10 cents. 



All concede that games and recreative 
exercises during the adolescent period 
are preferable to setdrills and monoton- 
ous movements. These drills, while de- 
signed primarily for boys, can be used 
successfully with girls and men and 
women. Profusely illustrated. Price 
10 cents. 

Group XVI. JKr? 

Xo. 161— Ten Minutes' Bxei'* 
ciae for Busy Men. 

By Dr. Luther Halsey Gulick, Direc- 
tor of Physical Training in the New 
York Public Schools. A concise and 
complete course of physical education. 
Price 10 cents. 

Xo. 20S— Physical Education 
and Hygiene. 

This is the fifth of the Physical 
Training series, by Prof. E. B. Warman 
(sec Nos. 142, 149. 166. 185. 213, 261. 290.) 
Price 10 cents. 

Xo. 149— The Careof the Body. 

A book that all who value health 
should read and follow its instructions. 
By Prof. E. B. Warman. the well-known 
lecturer and authority on physical cul- 
ture. Price 10 cents. 



No. 112— Physical Training 
Simplified. 

By Prof. K. B. Warman. A complete, 
thorough and practical book where the 
whole man is considered— brain and 
body. Price 10 cents. 

Xo. 185— Health Hints. 

By Prof. E. B. Warman. Health in- 
fluenced by insulation: health influ- 
enced by underwear: health influenced 
by color; exercise. Price 10 cents. 

Xo. 21 3-285 Health Answer.. 

By Prof. E. B. Warman. Contents: 
ventilating a bedroom; ventilating a 
house; how to obtain pure air: bathing; 
salt water baths at home; a substitute 
for ice water; to cure insomnia, etc. 
etc. Price- 10 cents. 

Xo. 23S— Muscle Balding. 

By Dr. L. H. Gulick, Director of Phy. 
sical Training in the New Yos'c Public 
Schools. A" complete treatis* on the 
correct method of acquiring a jrngtb. 
Illustrated Price 10 cents. 

Xo. 234— School TactiCl M } 
Maze Running. 

A series of drills for the use of sch <oL* 
Edited by Dr. Luther Halsey Gu ick. 
Director of Physical Training in the 
New York Public Schools. Price 10 
cents. 

Xo. 201— Tensing Exercises. 

By Prof. E. B. Warman. The "Ten- 
sing" or "Resisting" system of mus- 
cular exercises is the most thorough, 
the most complete, the most satisfac- 
tory, and the most fascinating of By** 
terns. Price lOjcents. 



With hints on right living. By W. J. 
Cromie. If one will practice the exer- 
cises and observe the hints therein 
contained, he will be amply repaid for 
so doing. Price 10 cents. 

Xo. 288— indigestion Treated 
by Gymnastics 

By W. J. Cromie. If the hints there- 
in contained are observed and the 
exercises faithfully performed great 
relief will be experienced. Price 10 
cents. 



Xo. 



Krep 



By Prof. E. B. Warman. author of a 
number of books dn the Spalding Ath- 
letic Library op physical ' 
Price 10 cents. 



A. G. SPALDING 

From Photograph Takex.ix Sax Francisco 

ix November, 1879 



^| Spalding's Athletic Library t? 

Group I. No. i 



^ SPALDING'S 
^ OFFICIAL r 



^ BASE BALL 4 
GUIDE 

Thirty -third Year 



1909 

Edited by \V 

JOHN B. FOSTER 



American Sports Publishing Co. 
W 21 Warren St., New York Jk 

Copyright, 1909, by American Sports Publishing Company. 



Contents 



PAGE 

A. G. Spalding Base Ball Trophy 353 

American League Averages, Official 338 

American League Season of 1908 117 

Annual Spring Meeting National League 369 

Attendance of 1908 344 

Base Ball in Australia 370 

Base Ball Playing Rules, Official 299 

Index to 328 

Index, Ready Reference, to 296 

Base Ball Playing Rules, Spalding's Simplified— 

Ball 285 

Ball Ground-How to Lay It Out 284 

Balls, Providing 286 

Balls, Soiling 286 

Base Running Rules 291 

Bat, Regulation 285 

Batting Rules 289 

Benches, Players' 286 

Coaching Rules 294 

Definitions, General 295 

Field for Play, Fitness of 287 

Field Rules 286 

Game, Regulation 287 

Gloves and Mitts, Regulation 285 

Ground Rules 294 

Innings, Choice of 287 

Players, Number and Position of 286 

Players, Substitute 287 

Pitching Rules 288 

Scoring Rules. 295 

Scoring of Runs 294 

Umpire's Authority 295 

Umpire's Duties 294 

Uniforms 286 

California State League 281 

College Schedules for 1909 355 

Diagram, Correct, of a Ball Field 298 

Editorial Comment 25 

Extracts from Mr. A. G. Spalding's Address 365 

From Friends 346 

Henry Chadwick, Obituary of 7 

Honor for Deceased Members of National League 21 

Honor to the Sport 135 

National Association of Professional Base Ball Leagues — 

American Association 149 

Arkansas State League 260 

Atlantic Association 282 

Blue Grass League , 280 

Carolina Association 265 

Central Association 225 

Central League 205 

Connecticut League 273 

Cotton States League 191 

Eastern Carolina League 253 

Eastern Illinois League 250 



Natfonal Association of Professional Base Ball I ■• ..)- PAOl 

Eastern League 157 

(Jul- rue 

Illinois-Missouri I 

Indiana-Illinois-Iowa 1 .eagUC 

International League 

Interstate I league 

Mains League 

Now England League 

Now York State League 

Northern League 

• ; hwestern League 187 

Ohio and Pennsylvania League 

Ohio State I league 

Oklahoma- Kansas League 2~. L 

Pacific Coast League 27 T 

Pennant Winners in 1908 283 

Pennsylvania- West Virginia League 269 

South Atlantic League 195 

South Carolina State League 2CS 

Southern Association 167 

Southern Michigan League 231 

Texas League 279 

Tri-State League 175 

Virginia League 211 

Western Association 221 

Western League 181 

Wisconsin-Illinois League 247 

National League Averages, Official 332 

National League Campaign of 1908 81 

Public Schools Athletic League of Greater New York 3C8 

Rules. Official Playing 299 

Index to Playing 32S 

Ready Reference Index to 296 

Semaphore Signals by the Umpires 331 

Schedules for 1909 371 

Short Biographies of the Champions 73 

Symposium Upon the "Spit Ball" 37 

The Chadwick Monument 369 

The Minor Leagues 145 

The New Editor of the Guide 23 

World's Championship Series, 19CS 5U 




"Father of Base Ball" 

Born October 6, 1824, in Jessamine Cottage, St. Thomas, Exeter. Eng, 
Died April 20, 1908, at Brooklyn : N. Y. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 7 

HENRY CHADWICK 
"The Father of Base Ball" 

By Johx B. Foster 

Eighty-four years of honest, simple, persevering and manly 
life. He died as he had lived — brave to the last. Defiantly risk- 
ing his health in a temperature fur which younger men had 
gone forth better prepared, because of his great love for the 
game he braved the elements to witness the opening champion- 
ship Base Ball game of 1008 in Brooklyn, contracted a severe 
cold, which speedily developed into pneumonia and breathed 
his life slowly away, for Nature's forces had been exhausted 
with his term of years. 

Prior to the game in Brooklyn — a matter of only a few days 
— the writer saw him for the last time in life. It was a biting 
afternoon, yet he had made the long trip from Brooklyn to 
the Polo Ground, New York, that he might watch the Yale 
Base Ball players. "I do like to see college Base Ball," said 
he, "and Yale always has had a fascination for me." 

"Tad" Jones was catching for Yale in the practice game 
against the New York team, and repeatedly "Father" Chad- 
wick called attention to the excellence of his work. "It is 
astonishing," said he, "what progress has been made by our 
college men in Base Ball. They have acquired the finer points 
of the sport almost to the equal of the professionals who make 
a thorough study of the game. In nothing have the younger 
generation improved more than in fielding." 

"Father" Chadwick remained until the sun had begun to 
descend below the high bluff that is back of the ground. He 
coughed slightly, and it was suggested to him that it might 
be foolish if he remained too long, as the Polo Ground is in- 
clined to be damp in the spring. 

"Yes, I must be going." said he. "but I want to say a word 
to McGraw before I start." The New Y'ork manager walked 
across the field to where "Father" Chadwick was seated. The 
veteran writer greeted him cordially, complimented him on the 
fine showing of "the Giants, and, a? "he bade him farewell, said: 
"I shall not be able to see you at the opening game, as I am 
going to Brooklyn, but I wish you good luck." With that he 
left, his last visit to a field which is famous the United States 
over. 

True to his determination, he did attend the opening game 
at Brooklyn and the exposure resulted fatally, as has been 
related. 

Henry Chadwick came by his ability to write in part through 
the training of his father,". James Chadwick, editor of the West- 
ern Times, of Exeter, England. The brother of the "Father of 
Ba.se Ball" was Sir Edwin Chadwick, the noted sanitary phil- 
Oaopher. 

When a boy of thirteen the "Dean of Base Ball Writers," as 
he subsequently became, arrived in the United States. Six 
years later than that he began to be a contributor to the Long 
Island Star. 

In early life Mr. Chadwick was a teacher of music, and he 
never lost his fondness for it, practising daily at his piano 
up to his last illness. It was his especial delight to play for 
his friends when visiting them, he being able to render many 
of the old operatic selections and also his own compositions. 



8 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

from memory. He was also an enthusiastic chess player, being 
the author of several books on the subject, and also an authority 
on billiards. The old journalistic instinct inherited from his 
father began to crop out, however, during the decade of the 
'40s. In 1856 he became a regular reporter for the New York 
Times. His specialty was sporting topics. He had a wonderful 
fondness for games in which skill and athletic vigor were 
factors. The outdoor life in connection with them appealed to 
a nature which delighted in the freshness of the open. 

In 1858 he accepted a position with the New York Clipper 
and remained with that publication until 1888. He first began 
to write on Base Ball in 1858, and was* the first reporter to 
write Base Ball for the New Y T ork Herald, contributing to that 
journal in 1864, and later for the New York Sun. 

As early as 1860 his name is found in Beadle's "Dime Base 
Ball Player." He was also editor of DeWitt's "Base Ball 
Guide" from 1869 to 1880, <r The Art of Batting and Base- 
Running," of the early eighties, and the "American Boy's Book 
of Sports," and scores of other works, mostly on Base Ball. 

In his later years he was a member of the staff of the 
Brooklyn Eagle, serving more than forty-five years as Base Ball 
writer and in other capacities, and up to the time of his death 
was the only surviving member of the editorial staff of 1863. 
He was engaged in magazine work for Outing, and for years 
articles by his pen appeared from time to time in the columns 
of Sporting Life and Sporting News, the long-established weekly 
Base Ball publications of the United States. 

He frequently wrote for the Tribune, Mercury, the Morning 
World, and the Evening Telegram, of New l'ork, and other 
eastern newspapers, contributing specialized articles for which 
he had a reputation from one ocean to the other, especially 
for those which had to do largely with statistics and itemized 
detail. 

Henry Chadwick became editor of Spalding's Official Base 
Ball Guide in 1881, and held the position until his death. 
He saw the volume increase in size from year to year, and 
increase relatively in importance, until he was amazed at its 
own growth, notwithstanding the fact that he always had pos- 
sessed an abiding faith as to the part 1 that Base Ball would 
play in the athletic life of the country. 

In 1904 Mr. Chadwick celebrated his eightieth year, which 
also marked the half century of his journalistic endeavor. At 
the time he was the recipient of many congratulatory messages 
from prominent men from all over the country, including one 
from President Roosevelt, of whom he was a personal friend. 

Mr Chadwick became connected with the old National Base 
Ball Association in 1858. and up to the last year of its exist- 
ence, 1870, he was conspicuous for nearly a decade as chairman 
of its committee on rules and the author of all the prominent 
changes in the rules of play in the game from which was 
developed the splendid game of to-day. 

The National League and American Association of Professional 
Base Ball Clubs of the United States elected him an honorary 
member in 1894 and in notifying him wrote : 

"In conferring this membership, this organization pays the 
highest tribute in its power to one who, during a number of 
years almost as great as is usually allotted to man to live, 
has unselfishly devoted his time, talents and energies, by 
voice and pen, to establish Base Ball as the national game 
of America. At all times and in all places he has diligently 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 9 

worked for its development and battled for its integrity Its 
honesty, and the purity of its methods." 

Year by year as ball players and leagues multiplied the de- 
mand grew for accurate annual information in regard to the 
enormous army of athletes enrolled under the standard of the 
National Game, and none will gainsay that "Father" Chad- 
wick was not justly entitled to remark with modesty now and 
then, "I am glad *that I have done my part and have seen 
such an abundant harvest." 

The one characteristic, 'which above all others manifests itself 
in the thousands and thousands of words, which he has penned 
about Base Ball, is his unswerving integrity to the sport and 
his decided hostility to anytking which savored of sharp prac- 
tice or acute professionalism. 

Never has there lived a man who fought harder, more deter- 
minedly or with a more trenchant pen for Base Ball which 
should be exempt from anything which would tend to make it a 
target for enemies to reach. 

His earliest struggle was for honest Base Ball, and he fought 
with such a vim that many a player in the days when the 
sport was beginning to grow slowly but surely into the hearts 
of the people, lived to regret the hour that "Father" Chadwick 
turned his pen in his direction for a violation of the ethics of 
the game. 

The tribute which, at best, could fee but poorly paid by the 
present editor, would but faintly describe, at its best, the 
worth of this man to a national pastime when worth such as 
his was needed. Reiterate again and again his singleness of 
purpose and the sincerity of his motives and let them swell 
into a grand volume of eulogism and what everybody knows * 
has after all merely been repeated in praise of the man who 
is sleeping sweetly in Greenwood. 

He is buried in Greenwood Cemetery in a plot, which is 
beautifully situated, and which was the gift of Mr. A. G. 
Spalding, with whom "Father" Chadwick had been associated 
for so long. 

Gray heads were present in plenty when the funeral services 
were held on the morning of April 23, 1908, in th» Church of 
Our Father (TJniversalist) in Brooklyn. As the casket was 
borne into the edifice the congregation arose, the honorary pall 
bearers passing up the aisle. They were : St. Clair McKelway, 
editor of the Brooklyn Eagle ; A. G. Mills, ex-president of the 
National League ; Harry C. Pulliam, president of the National 
League ; P. T. Powers, president of the National Association 
of Professional Base Ball Leagues ; James E. Sullivan, presi- 
dent of fcfee Amateur Athletic Union and president of the 
American Snorts Publishing Company, the publishers of the 
Guide ; William T. Brown, of the firm of A. G. Spalding & 
Bros. ; Charles H. Ebbets, president of the Brooklyn Base Ball 
Club ; J. M. Cummings, of the Baltimore News ; John T. Doyle, 
of the American Sports Publishing Company, and William T. 
Conklin, of Brooklyn. 

The casket was placed in front of fhe pulpit platform which 
was banked with a profusion of flowers. The services were 
simple and impressive. After reading the Scripture the pas- 
tor, the Rev. Dr. Thomas Edw r ard Potterton, delivered the 
following address : 

DR. POTTERTON'S ADDRESS. 

"There are times when we are conscious of the inadequacy 
of language ; there are occasions when words cannot express 



BPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL <;ni)i;. n 

the sense of loss that has conic to us. And yel there is the 

insistent demand thai we endeavor to express our recognition 

of the value of ;i friend. We have come to speak the word of 

appreciation over the sacred clay of Father Chadwick, and to 

comfort those who mourn. Let not sadness he dominant at a 
death, hut gladness in the triumph of a life. Death is hut an. 
incident in life: the Closing of a chapter in the wondrous story 
that we arc 1 writing. 

"Yesterday our dear friend passed on into the invisible 
silence of God, and to-morrow our turn must come. hi view 
of the Inevitable transition the true heart will not dwell upon 
the superficial of life position, profession, party — but will 
ask the elemental questions as to goodness, honesty, upright- 
ness, sense of justice and of God. 

•"The mantle of earth lias fallen from the spirit of Henry 
Chadwick ; the robe of heaven', we believe, now adorns the life. 
We remember him. and revere his memory, because <>f his 
interest in all things pertaining to human welfare. "Whenever 
a good cause appealed to humanity there came always a gracious 
response from our venerable friend. 

"It is said that the good die young, and it is true, for the 
good never grow old. The spirit -in the worn and weary hody 
of Mr. Chadwick was young and fresh, for he loved his fellows 
and was at peace with God. 

"Every life has a key-word tkat unveils the inner sanctuary. 
The one word that I would connect with our friend's life is 
kindness, lie was a kind man. Using the word in its most 
comprehensive sense his life incarnated all. 

"The right place to get at the diameter of a man is in the 
home. In this divine - place Father Chadwick's life was 
supremely great. For more than half a century he had enjoyed 
the confidence and love of a noble woman, and to her he gave- 
the nobility of a manhood that was unsullied and unstained. 
There comes before me now a picture of the aged man going 
out from the home to do the daily task, bending over the face 
of the venerable wife, and with deep affection imprinting the 
kiss of love. It is such little attentions that prove the dignity 
and beauty of life ! 

"Mr. Chadwick was a man thoroughly imbued with a fine 
ethical sense. He did things because he deemed them right. 
And once that Father Chadwick had determined a course to- 
be right, nothing could swerve him from the path of duty. 
The voice of conscience was the voice of God, and he would be 
obedient. 

"As a communicant of the Church of Our Father he was 
sincere, devoted, generous and helpful. He always had an 
appreciative word for the minister and the choir, and his 
presence was a benediction to the congregation. Ho carried his 
strong, liberal faith into the realm of sports, and labored con- 
tinuously for what has been termed 'clean sport.' Brutality he 
deplored and denounced, hut always rejoiced that he had been a 
factor in giving pleasure to great throngs who are devotees of 
the National Game. 

"Mr. Chadwick was very proud, and rightly, too. of the title 
that had been given him by those who appreciated his work — 
'The Father of Base Ball.' And to us who knew him well there 
was no other appellation ; he was to his friends 'Father Chad- 
wick.' 

"We hazard the declaration that if the Church had labored 
less in wild and senseless denunciation of sports and amuse- 
ments, and endeavored more to produce the quality of life 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 13 

animated with good Bense and religion, as revealed by Father 
Chadwick, it would have been better. 

"in the long reaches of the yean Henry Chadwick had 
achieved that good something which we call character. After 
all character is the only thing that counts with God and man. 
The old man. with fullness of years, was constantly reiterating 
the message of all good men, the necessity of developing and 
maintaining a noble character. In the attainment of this true 
object in life Father Chadwick walked humbly with God, in 
lnving companionship with the Divine Master, in loyalty and 
with his friends, and presented to the world the inspira- 
tion of a blameless and useful life. 

"We loved the dear old man, and that love to us shall be 
an incentive to realize his word to his fellows, printed in the 
GUIDE he edited and proclaimed by his lips and life: 'Place 
premium on character.' 

"We long shall miss thee as we go our ways. 

The home will miss thee from its broken band; 
Full many a tear will tell thy sober praise, 

And all good works will miss thy helping hand. 
And yet, Good bye! Good bye! thou faithful soul! 

From toil and trouble thou hast earned release, 
Thy weary feet are resting at the goal, 

The pain of living ended in God's peace." 

The floral tributes completely filled the chancel. The New 
York Base Ball Club, and the Brooklyn Base Ball Club, both 
players and owners, sent huge bunches of roses. A large and 
exquisite Base Ball of white immortelles, with the stitching 
worked out in violets, came from Mr. A. G. Spalding. The 
Athletics of Philadelphia, the Kansas City team, the Brooklyn 
Eagle and the Standard Union, of Brooklyn, sent flowers to 
the church. So did the Sporting Writers' Association of Phila- 
delphia, and individual friends by the score. 

As a mark of respect to the deceased flags were displayed at 
half-mast on the afternoon of the funeral at many of the prin- 
cipal Base Ball grounds in the United States. 

Mr. Chadwick was a member of the Society of Old Brook- 
lynites and of the New York Tress Club. His surviving family 
consists of a wife, who was a Miss Botts, of an old Virginia 
family, to whom he was happily wedded for sixty years, two 
daughters and a number of grandchildren and several great- 
grandchildren. 

□ □ D 

TRIBUTES TO HENRY CHADWICK'S LIFE-WORK 

AND CHARACTER 

Father Chadwiek's death brought forth a universal expression 
of regret. From Maine to California the news of his decease 
was heard with sorrow, and by a multitude whom he never 
saw in person, nor was seen of* himself by them. 

Mr. A. G. Spalding, with whom the venerable man had been 
associated, for years, said upon hearing the news of his death : 

"By the death of Mr. Henry Chadwick, the game of Base 
Ball loses its most prominent figure and staunchest supporter, 

"Mr. Ghadwiek always stood for the best in Base Ball, and 
his trenchant pen could always be depended upon to ai^ in 
raising the moral standard of the game, and was utterly op- 



14 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

posed to anything that would tend to drag it down. Almost 
alone and single-handed he fought the gambling element that 
had an almost death grip on the game in the early seventies. 
When professional Base Ball was organized in 1871, a majority 
of those in control of the game at that time contended that 
the game could not live without the extraneous aid of gambling, 
and that pool-selling on the grounds must be permitted, as in 
horse racing, but Mr. Chadwick said 'NO,' and in his vigorous 
writings insisted that the only way to popularize Base Bail, 
keep it free from corruption, and perpetuate the sport, was 
to eliminate gambling from it entirely. In 1876 that splendid 
Base Ball organizer, Mr. William A. Hulbert of Chicago, 
assisted by the present United States Senator, Morgan G. 
Bulkeley of Connecticut ; Mr. A. G. Mills of New York, Mr. 
N. E. Young of Washington, and others, joined Mr. Chadwick 
in his journalistic crusade against the gambling element, and 
the result of the combination was that pool-selling on all Base 
Ball grounds was abolished. Clubs that permitted gambling on 
their grounds in any form were expelled from the National 
League ; immediate expulsion was the penalty to players who 
became interested in any kind of wager on the games with the 
result that to-day we see thousands of games of Base Ball 
being played throughout the land with the old gambling vice, 
so far as Base Ball is concerned, rooted out entirely. This was 
probably Mr: Chadwick's greatest service to the game. 

"Fortunately, Mr. Chadwick, after his life-work in its interest, 
lived to see his favorite game of Base Ball, which he so faith- 
fully nursed in its cradle, grow to its present proportions and 
become universally recognized as the national game of America. 
President Roosevelt (whom Mr. Chadwick frequently referred to 
as his 'young friend Theodore') in his letter of congratulation 
to Mr. Chadwick on his eightieth birthday, said : 'It is given 
to but few men to enjoy the privilege of active participation in 
the affairs of life for so long a period, and you are entitled to 
the good wishes of all for that part you have taken in behalf 
of decent sport.' 

"I knew Mr. Chadwick intimately for over forty years, and 
can attest to his sterling worth, honesty of purpose and great 
ability as a journalist. His aid in the upbuilding of Base Ball 
has been invaluable, and the present great popularity of the 
game is largely due to his efforts. I don't believe the old gen- 
tleman had an enemy in the world, and I am sure I voice the 
sentiment of everyone interested in Base Ball and clean athletic 
sports when I say that he was an honor to the game he loved 
so well and for which he did so much." 

Harry C. Pulliam, President of the National League, wrote : 

"The death of Mr. Chadwick was a great shock to me, as 
aside from our official relations, his many lovable traits en- 
deared him to me so that I feel I have lost a dear friend. 

"The title, 'Father of Base Ball,' was fittingly bestowed on 
him, for his personality has been stamped on the progress of 
the National Game as was no other man's. From the early 
days, when the game was struggling for its life, until to-day, 
when it stands pre-eminent in America's sport, Mr. Chadwick 
has been a tireless worker in its cause, never losing his en- 
thusiasm. In fact, I doubt if any young player at the time of 
his death really was more enthusiastic than was this grand old 
man of Brooklyn in the game he loved so well. 

"Father Chadwick will be mourned by all Americans as the 
sponsor of their great national pastime and as the champion of 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 15 

everything that is true and sportsmanlike in the development 
of Base Ball to its present high standard. 

"Mr. Chadwick was an honorary member of the National 
League, the only man outside of the National League so hon- 
ored, and the league will, in due time, take such action as will 
show its respect to his memory." 

An editorial in the Brooklyn Eagle said : 

"The Eagle printed on Monday an obituary of Henry Chad- 
wick, a member of the staff of this paper, and the leading 
authority in the world on Base Ball. All the journals, to-day, 
have appreciative accounts of him, and many of them have con- 
siderate editorials concerning him. He did more than any other 
man to evolve the National Game, to systematize its rules, to 
encourage recourse to it, to harmonize its administration, and 
to make and to keep the playing of it honest. 

"All this was very much in itself. It involved the love and 
the labor of over sixty years of a long life. Those years car- 
ried Mr. Chadwick from the role of the originator to that of 
the father and the sage of a movement which involved recrea- 
tion, emulation, exercise and development for American youth 
and manhood, and which ineffaceably identifies him with some- 
thing which made the world distinctly better than he found it. 

"His life was innocent, useful and inspiring. His interests 
beyond his marked specialty were simple, sincere and sunny. 
He was a model husband, a loving father, a true friend, with 
malice toward none and with charity for all, and his kindred 
end his friends have the consolation of knowing that all to 
whom he brought uplifting pleasure share, with them, affection 
for his personality, sorrow because of his loss and a fond 
memory of what he so well did, over so long a time, for the 
happiness of his fellow men." 

An editorial in the New York Times said in part : 
"Henry Chadwick has been called the Father of Base Ball for 
many years, not because he invented the game, though he 
assisted materially in its gradual evolution, in the first half of 
the last century, from the simple old game of town ball, the 
4 one-old-cat ' and ' three-old-cat ' of the early boyhood of men 
now aged. Mr. Chadwick had fostered, encouraged, and helped 
to develop Base Ball through more than half a century, and 
for more than half that time had been the editor of the 
Official Guide. He believed in the efficacy and good moral 
influence of hearty outdoor sports, and for the full measure of 
his active life had devoted himself zealously as a newspaper 
writer to increasing the public interest in them. 

"To be known as the Father of Base Ball is no empty honor. 
Mr. Chadwick has passed away, in his eighty-fourth year, at the 
beginning of a new season of outdoor sports, when it seems that 
many men in the community, in common with many of the 
women and children, are more interested in Base Ball than in 
any other subject under the sun. Everybody that knows much 
about Base Ball knows all about Chadwick. His influence has 
been measurable in eliminating rowdyism and gambling from 
the game. He was an acknowledged authority on all its techni- 
calities. He invented the approved system of scoring. He had 
written enough about the game, wisely and clearly, to fill many 
volumes. To the very end of his life he attended Base Ball 
matches and vigorously expressed his opinion of the play : and 
his opinion counted. So that it may well be said of Chadwick 
that he died full of years and honors. He helped to make Base 



16 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

Ball the National Game, and as it is a game worthy of that 
honor, he accomplished something in his life worth remem- 
bering." 

Said the New York World : 

"Henry Chadwick, who died in Brooklyn yesterday in the 
ripeness of eighty-four years, once denied the title of 'Father of 
Base Ball.' 'The game never had a father,' he said. 'All 
that I or any one else has done has been to develop what was 
a field exercise long before we took serious note of it .' 

"Mr. Chadwick was born in England, unlike his favorite 
game. Cricket was the pastime of his youth. According to his 
own story, it was while on his way to see a cricket match on 
the old Elysian Fields in Hoboken that he saw his first Base 
Ball contest in 1856. And it struck him that day that there 
was the National Game for America. 

"Base Ball grew up rapidly after the late fifties. In 1907 
the major league meetings alone drew more than six million 
persons. For this great prosperity and popularity Mr. Chad- 
wick must receive a large share of credit. He had made people 
believe in the sport." 

The Chicago Inter-Ocean remarked editorially : 
"Henry Chadwick did much for the game, however, and his 
title of 'The Father of Base Ball' will probably be allowed to 
stand. A fine old gentleman, at any rate, whose enthusiasm 
was not at all dimmed by the advance of years." 

A glowing tribute was paid to the grand work which he had 
done for America's national pastime by Sporting Life, of Phila- 
delphia. No writer had a keener perception of the quality of 
Mr. Chadwick's work or a more comprehensive knowledge of 
what he had done personally for the game. 

Francis C. Richter, the editor of Sporting Life, said of the 
dead writer : 

"Perhaps the very greatest tribute we can pay to our dead 
friend and co-laborer is the simple statement of the fact that 
he was in all ways the ideal journalist. He never lost sight of 
the grave responsibilities of the press-writer, never forgot or 
violated the ethics of his profession, never yielded any of his 
high ideals, and never degraded or perverted his pen for any con- 
siderations whatsoever. We can safely say — and, in saying it, 
strikingly portray in a sentence the exalted character of the 
man — that in over fifty years of incessant newspaper work 
Henry Chadwick never published knowingly a lie or libel, never 
wrote a line of which. he was ashamed or which he would have 
recalled, and never assailed man or measure on personal 
grounds. What wonder that he was universally beloved. 

"Measured by material standards Henry Chadwick's life was 
not what worldings would call successful ; if it were these lines, 
and countless other eulogies, would not be written. But, meas- 
ured by all that makes the full, rounded, useful life — by char- 
acter, ability, achievement, and all the qualities that make for 
common as well as individual weal — the life of Henry Chadwick 
has been a glorious success, creditable to himself, useful to the 
community, and an inspiration to this and other generations. 
And so it is small wonder that to-day not only a host of per- 
sonal friends and admirers, but a whole nation of lovers of 
clean, wholesome, honest sport, mourn at the bier of one who 
was, like the ancient Brutus, the 'noblest Roman of them all.' 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 17 

"For Henry Chadwick's soul eternal peace ; for his memory 
enduring shrine in the hearts of his surviving contemporaries ; 
for his glorious reputation the history of the first century of 
Base Ball ; and for his monument fhe inextinguishable record of 
his labors and achievements in behalf of America's National 
Game. To no one more than the deceased Henry Chadwick will 
apply the words of the Great Master, 'Well done, thou good and 
faithful servant.' And so, resigned and with full confidence in 
the tender mercy of the Creator, we leave Henry Chadwick to 
his eternal reward !" 

T. II. Murnane. the well-known Base Ball critic of Boston, 
and president of the New England League, said : 

"Henry Chadwick learned to play cricket as a boy in England, 
and the erame of his boyhood was ever nearest his heart. Being 
a clever writer on sports and finding that Base Ball was to be 
the game of this country, Mr. Chadwick fell into line, influenced 
by the late Harry Wright. 

"That was over sixty years ago, and from that time until he 
laid down his magic pen at Brooklyn a few days ago, Henry 
Chadwick was the American game's most devoted champion, and 
well deserves a monument to his memory by the professional 
players of this country. A monument that will symbolize the 
rise of a simple recreation to the highest class of outdoor 
sports, by the pen of a man who could paint the ideal, and 
then struggle on to see his dream realized. 

"In the early seventies, when the old Union Grounds at 
Brooklyn were the scene of many a crooked deal on the ball 
field, the name of Henry Chadwick was feared by the wrong- 
doers, for his pen was never idle : working to save the game 
from the influences of gamblers and ball players without hearts 
or souls, who were knifing the sport in a most barefaced way, 
as there was little notice given to the sport in the daily papers 
and the players could make more money by crooked deals and 
double crosses than by the salaries guaranteed by the gate 
money." 

The Boston Herald said : 

"The late Henry Chadwick. 'Father of Base Ball,' had a 
great love for our National Game and wielded a powerful pen 
to keep it clean. It stands to-day without an equal in this 
respect in professional sport, and Henry Chadwick certainly 
played an important part in making the game what it is." 

Glowing tribute was paid in the Washington Post as follows : 

"To his untiring effort is due the everlasting popularity of 
America's National Game. It was Henry Chadwick's tender care 
that developed the diamond sport to its present high standard 
of proficiency. 

"Out of the crude mists of almost meaningless effort, with 
his own hands ke fashioned it. Untiring labor shrouded its 
early growth. Ceaseless zeal protected the frail plant from the 
biting skepticism of an unappreciative world in the chill dawn 
of its earliest existence. 

"Implicit faith and unswerving purpose dissipated the murky 
clouds of dull unconcern and brought forth the sun of public 
worship. And the small shoot blossomed and grew. 

"Each succeeding year saw it more firmly rooted in the 
hearts of the people of this great republic until to-day the 



18 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

nation, as it were, finds refuge in the branches of the sturdy 
tree. 

"No sarcophagus of marble could warm that stilled heart in 
the great beyond as the tribute of universal appreciation 
breathed to-day by the countless millions of admirers of the 
greatest of all games. 

"Broadcast over the land all classes of recreation's disciples 
unite in stirring requiem to the departed hero. The ebbing 
notes of 'decrepit age' swell with untiring and 'vigorous youth' 
the symphonies of undying respect." 

The editor of the St. Louis Snorting News, to which Mr. 
Chadwick had been a contributor, wrote : 

"On January 14, 1904, Mr. Chadwick received from President 
Roosevelt an autograph letter congratulating him on entering 
into the eightieth year of his life and the fiftieth of his jour- 
nalistic career. The venerable scribe was also commended by 
the Nation's executive for his effort to uplift sport. This and 
other expressions of esteem and approval received from men of 
prominence in all the higher walks of life, were highly prized 
by Mr. Chadwick. He later called at the White House and was 
accorded an audience by President Roosevelt, who approved of 
his visitor's suggestion that the sailors and soldiers should be 
encouraged to play Base Ball at home and abroad. Throughout 
the evolution of Base Ball from an open lot experiment to the 
scientific stage as a sport and its growth into a business, in 
which millions of dollars are invested, Mr. Chadwick was an 
ardent advocate of honesty and sportsmanship and an aggressive 
and relentless foe of rowdyism and hippodroming. Many of 
his suggestions were incorporated in the code of rules and until 
recent years he was the most noted of Base Ball statisticians. 
In appreciation of the extended and invaluable services he had 
rendered in promoting and preserving the game's popularity, 
The National League elected him an honorary member and voted 
him an annuity of $600. None held him in higher esteem than 
the younger writers on Base Ball, who are indebted to him for 
chronicling the game's history from its infancy to the com- 
mencement of the current championship season. Peace to the 
soul of him who as scribe and sportsman helped to give a 
nation a pastime !" 

Henry P. Edwards, Base Ball editor of the Cleveland Plain 
Dealer, wrote : 

"In the death of 'Father' Chadwick Base Ball has lost the 
man who did as much, if not more, than any other one man to 
make Base Ball the National Game. Mr. Chadwick watched the 
game grow from the old 'rounders' to the scientific sport that 
it now is. 

He watched the coming and going of all the famous players 
from the days of the late Senator Gorman. N. E. Young, A. G. 
Mills, A. G. Spalding, the Wright brothers — George and Harry — 
Reach, Gould, Anson, Brouthers, Connor, Dun lap, to Ward, 
Delehanty, Rusie and others, and witnessed the development 
of those stars that are household celebrities at the present 
time. 

"He was first, last and all the time a booster, except when 
dishonesty made its efforts to break up the game. Mr. Chad- 
wick always opposed the gambling evil that at times has injured 
the sport and stood firm for honest, clean ball." 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 19 

The Boston Evening Record commented thus kindly : 
"It was 'Father Chadwick' who advised abolishing the error 
column, in scoring Base Ball, on the ground that it was punish- 
ment enough for a player to miss the credit of liguring in a 
successful play. This suggestion, ahsurd though it may have 
been, was like a beam of light out of the kind, sweet nature 
of the old Base Ball idealist. Peace to his honored ashes." 

In the New York Evening Mail the following lines appeared : 
"Mr. Chadwick was the leading statistician of the game, and 
his records of the work of the players of the big leagues were 
accepted as authentic. He edited the Official Base Ball Guide, 
and in addition to that work he wrote voluminously for various 
sporting publications. 

" 'Pop' Chadwick, as he was affectionately called by all who 
knew him, and no one connected with Base Ball or interested in 
it could fail to know the old man, was never so happy as when 
seated in a ball park watching the work of a team. He never 
failed to score the game, and while his failing eyesight com- 
pelled him frequently in later years to ask questions of the 
keener eyed, still his scoring was accurate to the last." 

Frank O'Loughlin, an American League umpire, said when he 
heard of the death : 

"Poor old Chadwick, the 'Father of Base Ball,' is no more. 
God rest his soul. 

"I always loved Father Chadwick, for it was he who gave 
me my first encouraging words when I started out as an umpire. 
It was in Wilkes-Barre, Pa., in 1898, that Mr. Chadwick saw 
me umpire. After the game he called on me, complimented and 
congratulated me on my work, and told me to stick to umpiring. 

"I followed his advice. That's the reason I'm an arbitrator 
to-day." 

Ren Mulford, one of the oldest Base Ball writers of the West, 
said, in Cincinnati : 

"Henry Chadwick's name is linked with Base Ball to live as 
long as the game itself lives. The patriarch among diamond 
historians may not have been the actual father of the great 
national pastime, but no one did more in the infancy of the 
sport than he for its well-being and permanency. There never 
was a word in all the 'miles' of copy that Henry Chadwick has 
written that was not penned for the betterment of the game as 
he saw it. He was an earnest and consistent advocate of clean 
ball and aggressive, loyal service. 

"It was my good fortune to entertain Henry Chadwick the 
last time he came to Cincinnati to pay his tribute to the memory 
of Harry Wright at the memorial game played at League Park. 
On that occasion, despite the weight of years upon his broad 
shoulders, he went out on the field and batted 'fungo' to the 
delight of the assembled crowd. 

"The Grand Old Man loved music almost as well as Base Ball 
and he was a pianist of ability. Every morning at 5 o'clock 
during his Norwood sojourn he was up with the sun, playing 
compositions of his own quite as full of melody as his Base Ball 
writings were of ringing sincerity. The National League hon- 
ored itself when Henry Chadwick was made an honorary mem- 
ber of the parent organization. Base Ball is better for the life 
and teaching of Henry Chadwick." 



20 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

Sam Crane wrote in the New York Evening Journal as fol- 
lows : 

"He saw the possibilities of Base Ball, and predicted its wide 
scope and popularity as the National Game in the enthusiasm 
of his youthful days, and his interest never nagged an instant 
during his nearly sixty years prominent connection with it. 

"No one did more for the welfare and salvation of Base Ball 
than Henry Chadwick. In the days of its adversity when 
crookedness crept into the ranks of the players, Henry Chad- 
wick was foremost in denouncing the enormity of the'. offence 
and the dangers to the very life of the game. He was a strong 
and earnest advocate of a permanent blacklist, and never wav- 
ered in his denunciation of anything that tended to lower the 
standard of the game. 

"He delighted to be called and known as the 'Father of Base 
Ball' and he well deserved the title which he so loved. 

"The great National Game of Base Ball which he founded 
and fostered so steadily, firmly and conscientiously, as it now 
stands, is a monument to his memory. It is doubtless the only 
monument he would have wished. That is as imperishable as 
any statue of granite or marble. 

"Henry Chadwick was the originator of most of the rules 
Base Ball is now played under. And that he did his pleasant 
duties well is shown by the long continuance of them." 

J. P. G. wrote in the Cricketer : 

"He has always been known as 'The Father of Base Ball,' 
and, on looking over his manuals of that game, it is most in- 
teresting to note the changes that have taken place in it. It 
is hard to realize that, in its inception, the pitcher was compelled 
to pitch with his arm hanging perpendicularly by his side, that 
a man caught on a foul bound was out, and that an umpire 
was not compelled to call balls on the pitcher unless he repeat- 
edly pitched unfair balls. The development of the game into 
the present aggressive, low-scoring contests, with their won- 
derful curve pitching, sharp calling of strikes and balls, and 
superb throwing from the outfield and infield, furnishes a most 
striking contrast to the game which cricketers love, and in 
which so few changes have taken place, and then only after 
the most deliberate and prayerful consideration. Let it be re- 
corded as one of Mr. Chadwick's chief claims to remembrance 
that he was, first and always, insistent that the game which 
he nurtured and advanced during the whole of his active life, 
should be played with absolute fairness ; that it should be kept 
free of all taint of dishonesty ; and that the umpire's decisions 
should be as absolutely accepted in Base Ball as they are in 
cricket. His whole influence was for clean sport : and the boys 
of the present day may well recollect that it was largely 
through his gratuitous work, and through his love of athletics, 
that the game of cricket was established on enduring founda- 
tions in this city." 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 21 

Honor for Deceased Members of 
National League 

For the first time in the history of the National League 
two honorary members of that organization died within a year. 
They were Henry Chadwick, the "Father of Base Ball" and 
former editor of the Guide, and Frank DeH. Robison, former 
principal owner, at varying intervals of the Cleveland club of 
the National League and the St. Louis club of the National 
League. Mr. Chadwick passed away in April and Mr. Robison 
in September. 

At the annual meeting of the National League in New York, 
in the month of December, the following resolutions were 
passed on the deaths of both gentlemen, as follows : 

Resolutions ox Mr. Chadwick's Death. 

Whereas, In the recent death of Mr. Henry Chad- 
wick, of Brooklyn, professional base ball lost an 
honored and true friend, who had dedicated his long, 
busy and useful life to the promotion, improvement 
and fostering of the national game, and 

Whereas, The deceased, being known as the father 
of base ball as well as an honorary member of the 
National League, those present at this meeting desire 
to pay tribute to his memory and to send expression 
of condolence to those nearest and dearest to Mr. 
Chadwick, and 

Whereas, He did much to uplift and to use his 
facile pen to keep the sport clean and pure, we each 
feel that in his death we have sustained a distinct 
personal loss; now, therefore, be it 

Resolved, That this resolution be spread upon the 
minutes of our meeting and a copy thereof be for- 
warded to the widow and other relatives of the de- 
ceased. 

Ox Mr. Fraxk DeH. Robisox. 

Frank De H. Robison's death has invaded our own 
household. It is only a short time ago since we had 
in our midst at these meetings a gentleman who had 
been identified with the National League for many 
years, whose counsel and advice were at all times 
for the best interests of all. Frank De H. Robison 
is with us no more. The death summons came sud- 
denly. We have lost not only a careful adviser and 
counsellor, but a lovable companion and friend. To 
the bereaved family the National League desires to 
express its deepest sympathy, and it is for that reason 
that we recommend that this little expression on the 
part of the League be properly inscribed on our 
records, and that it be engrossed, and that the Presi- 
dent of the League be directed to transmit the same 
to the family of the deceased. 




JOHN B. FOSTER, 

New York. 

Editor of Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 23 

The New Editor of the Guide 

John B. Foster, who has been selected to succeed the late 
Henry Chadwick as editor of the Guide, was born in Norwalk, 
Ohio, and resided there until 1883, when he removed to Cleve- 
land to take the position of State editor of the Cleveland Press. 
He was the valedictorian of his class, which graduated in 1882 
from the high school of his native city. While a boy and youth 
he played Base Ball with a team made up of young men of 
Norwalk, and engaged in many an exciting and interesting 
match with the nines of surrounding towns and cities. 

The present editor of Spalding's Guide began to write about 
Base Ball and players on Base Ball nines before he entered the 
high school. When sixteen years of age he was the scorer for 
a semi-professional team in Norwalk. Prior to leaving school 
he learned the printer's trade and did reportorial work on local 
newspapers. 

After graduation from school Mr. Foster was appointed assis- 
tant postmaster of Norw?lk, a position which he held until he 
resigned it to take up active newspaper work in Cleveland. 
During this period he was correspondent for many newspapers 
in the East and West, and his experience and success in that 
capacity paved the way for his entrance into regular newspaper 
work. While in the service of the government he became 
greatly interested in postal work and devoted much time to the 
study of costal routes and the rapid distribution of mail. 

On the Cleveland Press he served as State editor for a term 
of years reporting news generally throughout Ohio. He was a 
member of the city staff of that newspaper, and resigned that 
position to accept a position on the staff of the Cleveland 
Leader. On that newspaper he served as assistant news editor 
and general writer. 

It happened that the sporting editor was ill one afternoon, 
and Mr. Foster jokingly remarked that he would attend the 
Base Ball game and write a story about it. He was requested 
to do so, and from that date became a writer on sporting topics, 
Base Ball being the most prominent, and shortly was appointed 
sporting editor of the Cleveland Leader. Barring a short trip 
in Europe he was in charge of the sporting department of the 
Leader until 1896, when he resigned the position to accept one 
with the New York Evening Telegram, in charge of the bicycle 
department, cycling then being all the mode. Subsequently he 
was placed in charge of the editorial page of the Evening Tele- 
gram, and following that was made the editor-in-charge of the 
sporting department. He also acted in the capacity of afternoon 
city editor of the Evening Telegram, returning for the second 
time to the sporting department of that well-known metropolitan 
newspaper in charge of the news. He has contributed to other 
newspapers of New York and has held editorial positions upon 
them. He has also written largely upon general sports and 
Base Ball for publications throughout the United States. In 
addition to that the present editor of the Guide has also been 
a contributor to many magazines and weekly publications of 
prominence, and has engaged in correspondence on political and 
general news and in literary work. 




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BPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 26 

Editorial Comment 

By John B. Foster 

Sane administrations of governing Base Ball 
The Prosperity bodies, conservative handling of the affairs of 
of thp tne national game, honest dealing with the 

*. . , I? public, and a broader conception of the element 

National Game of sportsmanship, which is necessary to win 
and hold popular approval, had their share to 
do with the unequaled year of prosperity that culminated for 
Base Ball in the United States last October. 

It was not wholly the wonderfully close contests for the 
championship, which brought forth thousands one after an- 
other, to see the teams play for the various pennants in the 
major leagues and the minor leagues. 

Beyond any element of athletic dexterity and expertness on 
the playing ground, existed that healthy confidence which the 
American public has in the iron-clad honesty of those who 
have to do with the control and playing of professional Base 
Ball. 

There can never be any doubt as to the future of the sport 
so long as its management is in the hands of representative 
men of the country. Its possibilities have not more than been 
touched upon despite the prosperity that attached to it last 
season. It is true that if conditions are temporarily bad for 
individual clubs they are likely to be affected for the moment, 
just as a league might be overtaken by a financial storm, and 
having weathered it, prosper greater than ever before. 

The vast field of professional Base Ball and amateur Base 
Ball, taken in the abstract, has barely been scratched by the 
plough. Leagues unborn will prevail when the present genera- 
tion has passed away. Finer edifices than those which have 
been built to accommodate the spectators at professional and 
amateur contests will be built in the years to come. The ten- 
dency is ever to elevate the sport, and the standard of Base 
Ball half a century from now will be uplifted more and more 
as the better and truer nature of mankind asserts itself upon 
the daily life. 

The past has produced its share of really great minds,, which 
have been applied diligently and well to the successful making 
of a national pastime, and the future will increase their num- 
ber, for the toil of those in the past has demonstrated suc- 
cessfully that Base Ball is a calling in which the laborer is 
worthy of his hire. 

By the sterner and more precisely matter-of-fact element of 
our population, which, by heritage, is inclined to frown upon 
amusement, Base Ball is no longer accounted a profession in 
which a man, peculiarly gifted by nature to attain a certain 
high grade of perfection in a physical way, wastes the good 
years of his life, but as a profession which is helping scores 
of worthy young men who are both physically agile and skillful 
enough to assist by their manual efforts to prepare themselves 
mentally for the occupations in which it is their desire to pre- 
pare themselves to round out their full term of years. 

Therein Base Ball is a distinct national benefit to mankind 
in general, a fact which cannot be gainsaid. There are law- 
yers, doctors, merchants of standing, newspaper writers, lec- 
turers, even musicians, who owe a debt of gratitude to profes- 
sional Base Ball for the start which it gave them, and gladly 
do most of them admit the fact. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 27 

It is no longer just to tho professional ball player to hold 
that severe line of discrimination which it has been the fashion 
to draw between him and the amateur. As a class the profes- 
sionals to-day may ask a review of their careers and seek the 
same hearty commendation as those who play only for pleasure. 

Our national game is a game of which every good American 
can be proud, whether he would exalt the professional players 
that are to his liking, or those of his friends to whom Base 
Ball is but a personal pastime. 

nan 

fVnwth nf Attention is asked of Base Ball patrons to 

\>rowui oi the wonder f ul increase in popularity of the 

Base Ball game of Base Ball throughout the civilized 

Throughout world. The editor of the Guide during the 

thp World past season nas been called upon to answer 

1 c " wrw queries in regard to the rules from the coun- 
tries of Japan, Cuba, Australia, Yucatan, Mexico, England, the 
Philippine Islands, Hawaii and even South Africa, where the 
national sport of the United States has been spread through 
the influence of American graduates of our mining schools, 
who are engaged in the rich mines of that country. 

From Central America a correspondent writes that the game 
has become so popular that an organized league will be 
attempted another season with a regular championship schedule. 

The visit of the Cincinnati players to Havana, during the 
winter just past, resulted in large crowds being present at the 
games, and another year it is probable that Base Ball will be 
more extensively attempted in Cuba than it was in 1908 — that 
is to say, a greater effort will be made to attract visiting clubs, 
and it is possible that other cities than Havana will be visited 
by teams which are secured from the United States. 

The visit of a Base Ball nine of American players to Japan 
resulted in huge crowds to witness the contests. The Japanese 
have picked up the national sport of the Americans, with* the 
same avidity with which they seem to grasp anything which is 
American, and it is not improbable that we shall have within 
a year or two, at least, a visitation of a regularly organized 
Japanese nine to this country. 

England's interest in Base Ball is slowly but surely increas- 
ing. The activity of the game attracts the more agile of the 
English athletes, who are fond of it, and who are quick to 
adapt themselves to a sport which gives them amusement. It 
is predicted that the younger element of the British population 
will eventually become sufficiently interested in the pastime to 
perfect themselves to the extent where they will be willing to 
engage in a series of international contests. It is a fact that 
American pastimes and American methods are more readily 
appreciated by the growing athletes than by those who have 
reached maturity. That is as common in the United States as 
it is proved to be in most other countries. There is a very pro- 
nounced inclination in France to follow the lead of America 
in athletics, and it may eventually arrive at that point where 
the French population will engage in Base Ball. 

The mission of the Spalding trip around the world is bear- 
ing good fruit. It has taken time to ripen, but it is a notice- 
able fact that in all the countries which were visited by the 
Spalding tourists, with an exception or two, there has been a 
marked tendency to learn more about this wonderful sport of 
ours, which not only is a method of recreation and enjoyment 
to its participants, but a pleasure to the spectators. 




1, Frank L. Chance, Manager Chicago: 2, John J. McGraw, Manager 
New York; 3. Frederick T. Clarke, Manager Pittsburg; 4, John J. 
MeCloskey. Manager St. Louis; 5, William J. Murray, Manager 
Philadelphia; 6. John Ganzel, Manager Cincinnati; 7, P. J. Donovan, 
Manager Brooklyn; 8, Joseph J. Kelley, Manager Boston. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE TEAM MANAGERS, 1908. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 29 

At the winter meeting of tin* National 
Gambling League, which was held In the city of New 



and 



York in December hist, the final announce- 



ment of news was a forma 1 statement on the 

Base Ball part of the members that an attempt had been 

made prior to the last game of the year 

between New York and Chicago to influence the umpires by an 

alleged bribe. 

Messrs. William J. Klein and James Johnstone, who were 
the umpires of this contest, were the informants. They made 
their statements to President Pulliam, of the National League, 
who laid them before the organization. 

In connection with this announcement to the public, the 
National League made it very clear that the parties, who were 
acting as alleged bribers, were men who had nothing to do in 
any capacity with organized Base Ball. 

A committee was appointed to consider the charges and make 
a report to the National League. 

Inasmuch as there seemed to be some doubt as to whether 
this committee should ever be able to obtain tangible evidence 
by which it would be possible to establish a case, there were 
many who were of opinion that a mistake had been made by 
bringing the matter into public attention so long after the 
expiration of the regular Base Ball season. On the other hand, 
there were those who argued that it was best for Base Ball 
that the National League should acquaint the public with all 
the information which it possessed in regard to the matter. 

Facing the issue squarely, and looking at the situation as it 
exists, whether anything be proved or not, the incident cer- 
tainly can be considered as nothing but the greatest of compli- 
ments to Base Ball. The game in question was played and 
won absolutely on its merits. There were rumors within three 
days after it had been played that gamblers had contrived with- 
out success to reach the umpires, and there was many a good 
laugh among those who constitute the shadier element of the 
gambling profession that the conspirators had been foiled. 

Base Ball came through the crisis of a post-game campaign 
without a tarnish, without the semblance of a tarnish, and 
rather than attempting to make a sensation of the alleged 
bribery case, it would seem the better policy to show how abso- 
lutely futile it is to attempt to influence a sport with such a 
splendid environment of honest officials and national pride. 

□ □ □ 

To those who were concerned in the adjust- 
ment of relations between leagues, by which 
Sane the Eastern League and the American Associa- 

Legislation tion were granted those privileges which they 
deemed to be necessary to their future pros- 
perity and growth, the editor of the Guide 
extends heartiest commendation. 

Too freely have our Base Ball leaders been willing to rush 
to war in the past before they had exhausted all means of 
peaceful endeavor. 

War possesses exactly that lurid attribute which was attached 
to it by General Sherman. Base Ball war is no more exempt 
from its results than a war of murder and extinction between 
human beings, and the attendant destruction of property. 

The emergency which had arisen in the cases of the Eastern 
League and the American Association was not one of their own 




1, Hugh Jennings, Manager Detroit; 2, Norman Elberfeld. Manager 
New York; 3, Napoleon Lajoie, Manager Cleveland; 4. Fred Lake, 
Manager Boston; 5, Joseph Cantillon, Manager Washington; 6, James 
R. McAleer, Manager St. Louis; 7, Connie Mack, Manager Phila- 
delphia; 8, Fielder Jones, Manager Chicago. 

AMERICAN LEAGUE TEAM MANAGERS, 1908. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASH BALL GUIDE. 81 

making. It had been thrust upon them by the remarkable 
growth in population <>f the cities of their circuit Prosperity 

may have been anticipated when the two larger minor league 
circuits were organized, but it is to be doubted if prosperity 
had been expected to arrive on a Twentieth Century Limited. 
It is certain that when the future of the leagues in question 
had been considered five years ago, the most optimistic of those 
who had invested in the rights which accrue to clubs in or- 
ganized Base Ball had not dreamed of the remarkable increase 
in population of the cities in which their rights were invested. 

The outlook for their success may have appeared favorable, 
but there were none of them who could look forward to the 
fact that many cities of the East and the West, which are in- 
cluded in their circuits, would increase in population by more 
than one-third. 

It stands to reason that as cities become more important m 
business and mercantile affairs they grow relatively in pride. 
In that respect they are not unlike tbe individuals who com- 
pose them. 

The city of 20.000 population deems its place in the world a 
trifle more conspicuous than that of the city of 10,000 popula- 
tion. The city of 100,000 population considers itself entitled to 
wider recognition than that of the city of 50,000 population. 

To those who must cater to the wishes of the cities, there 
must be the capacity to imbibe the spirit of municipal growth. 
They must keep up with the times. They must meet the de- 
mands of their patrons, if they be purveyors of amusement, and 
that fact had been impressed more and more upon the holders 
of franchises in the Eastern League and the American Asso- 
ciation. They had learned that their communities were begin- 
ning to take a deeper and prouder interest in the affairs of the 
organizations which represented them, and they felt that they 
must have a wider latitude of ability to administer to the 
growing spirit of civic pride. 

How could they be blamed? Where they had scores to amuse, 
they found hundreds to be considered. Where they had found 
a ready and complaisant spirit to co-operate with them in the 
days of smaller communities, when the citizens were willing to 
see transfers made annually of players for the mere fact that 
they would not be deprived wholly of Base Ball, they were met 
with urgent appeals to provide good teams, with the incisive 
declaration that they would be supported if the attraction was 
worthy of the city. 

It was but the natural outburst of the community that was 
beginning to feel its growth, like the pride of the sturdy and 
growing boy, whose self-reliance increases with his years. 

Perhaps once or twice, while negotiations were in progress 
during the winter season, there were intimations of war — i 
mild it is true — but war of the kind that would result when 
the Eastern League and the American Association, goaded to 
a point where they felt that they must assert their independ- 
ence, would sever their connection with organized Base Ball 
and regulate their affairs to suit their own necessities. 

It is one of the very finest chapters of Base Ball history 
that the cause for this was eliminated, and that, at a sensible 
and business-like conference, these now Class AA organizations 
were able to state their case so convincingly that organized 
Base Ball is better for the Cincinnati conference. 

As our great national sport is governed at the present time, 
with its administration reaching out from the Atlantic to the 
Pacific Ocean, with its court of appeal, which has acted with 




L. CRISS, 

Champion Batsman American Leaguet 



HANS WAGNER, 
Champion Batsman National League. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 33 

auch wisdom and such justice, foolish is the League or club 
Which attempts any measure looking either to its overthrowal 
or to its embarrassment. 

Do not forget Unit the values of Base Ball franchises through- 
out all this broad domain to-day are predicated on the fact 
of co-operation as it exists in the present organization. lie- 
move that organization, establish a chaos of individual inde- 
Eendence, and not only will financial risks be increased by one 
undred per cent, but 1he artistic side of the game will re- 
ceive one of those setbacks of the past which years were neces- 
sary to overcome. 

It is just as true of Base Ball from the standpoint of 
mutual co-operation, as it is true of our splendid union of 
states, that "united we stand, divided we fall." 

□ □ □ 

If the student of Base Ball will reach back 

The War i nto some of the deepest recesses of his 

of thp memory, he will find hidden away recollections 

. J* e of days of the past when those who have 

Pitchers studied into the theory and the possibilities of 

the game, relating to an equitable adjustment 

of chances, have taken up the gauge against the pitcher and 

penalized his encroachment upon the realm of the batter. 

The pitcher is an industrious and an ingenious player. No 
sooner is a penalty imposed upon him than he takes up the 
task of bearing it and eventually making the burden as light 
as possible. The editor of the Guide believes that the time is 
slowly approaching when the pitcher will again be the target 
of the rule-makers, who will make an effort to handicap his 
prowess, to the extent that the batter will have a better chance 
to cope with him successfully. 

It may not be this year, nor the year after, but the stars 
in the sky predict the coming of the new era. 

As Base Ball is played to-day the game just trembles in the 
balance with the weight of an apothecary's scruple ready to 
move the beam one way or the other. Possibly there will be 
some who think the pitcher has the better of it, and yet when 
the games are closely analyzed it will be ascertained that the 
struggle between him and the batter for supremacy is very 
close. 

When so many games are decided at the very finish by the 
smallest possible score with which it is possible to decide 
them — one run — it shows that the balance of strength is closely 
adjusted. 

The last great move which was made against the pitcher 
was at Chicago, when the distance between his position and 
home plate was extended. For a period the pitcher was handi- 
capped. He had learned to throw the ball in such a manner 
that his curves broke at a certain point. It had been a fixed 
point, but it became a movable point when he was compelled 
to pitch a longer distance. 

But the pitcher is a persistent and a strong chap. He kept 
at work at the new distance, and year by year he succeeded 
better and better, and year by year overcame that handicap, 
so that to-day it is conceded that he is again quite on an 
equality with the batter. Some think that he is the batter's 
superior. 

Whenever pitcher and batter are at an equality it may be 
taken for granted that games will be close and hard fought, 




1, Tinker; 2, Tinker; 3, Evers; 4, Zimmermann: 5, Lundgren; 6, 
Slagle; 7, Pfeister. Photos by Conlon and Pictorial News Co. 

A GROUP OF WORLD'S CHAMPIONS, 1908. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 35 

and it may also be taken for granted that free batting will be 
the exception rather than the rule. Nothing demonstrates this 
more conclusively than the manner in which various batters 
face various pitchers. Given a pitcher whom a batter does 
not fear and the batter has all the confidence in the world. 
Given another, whom he knows is a master of all the arts 
which compose a pitcher's strategy, and the batter is cautious 
and discreet. 

So successfully has the pitcher fought his way into promi- 
nence, after the legislation which was passed against him in 
Chicago, that it is logical to believe him a player better 
equipped to-day than he was five years ago, and that if he is 
permitted to continue unchecked, ultimately the time will come 
when the preponderance of strength will be on his side, to the 
detriment of the batter. 

It is not urged that such is the case just now, but Base 
Ball seems making for that result. 

Various suggestions have been made in regard to legislation 
which shall increase batting, and which shall give the batters 
more opportunities to reach the bases. 

Among them is one that the number of called balls be re- 
duced to three. It is certain that this would handicap the 
pitcher, but possibly it would be too much of a handicap in 
that young pitchers would grant so many bases on balls, that 
the game would become stupid and tiresome. 

It has been suggested that four strikes would be a wise 
move, making the number of balls and strikes alike. Tradition 
is rather against this. There seems to be an impression that it 
is proper to regulate the number of called balls by varying the 
total, but no one wants to dispel that time-honored "three 
strikes," which has grown up with the game from boyhood. 

Another suggestion is that the number of strikes on four 
balls be reduced to one. The editor of the Guide can see no 
harm in this and thinks that it might be worth a trial. It is 
but a small matter, and if put into effect it might establish 
in some degree an approximate estimate of the reduction in 
base hits because of the foul strike rule — if there has been any 
great reduction. 

Some would bar the "spit ball." Elsewhere in the Guide 
there is a symposium of leading Base Ball writers of the 
United States regarding the "spit ball." Frankly it must be 
confessed that it is not a very elegant descriptive term, and 
the mere suggestion of it is not wholly pleasing to tne vast 
army of those who are fond of Base Ball. It must be remem- 
bered that we got along without it once and possibly could 
again, and whether it would make such a decided difference 
with some pitchers as has been asserted is another question 
worthy of experiment. 

In any event it is quite probable that we must look for 
some legislation before long in regard to the pitcher. We are 
all willing to concede that he is a plucky, determined Base 
Ball character, and the very fact that he is so persistent and 
combative makes it necessary now and then to subordinate 
him a little to the other men who are part of the game. 

It may be added that if the pitcher is handicapped in the 
future through any act of legislation on the part of the rule 
makers that within five years he will fight his way back to 
prominence. If he fails to do so it will be the first time 
within the history of Base Ball in the United States. 




1, Brown: 2, Overall; 3, Reulbaeh: 4, Howard; 5. Hayden: 6. Coakley; 
7, Moran. Photos by Richter and Pictorial News Co. 

A GROUP OF WORLD'S CHAMPIONS. 1908. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 87 

Symposium Upon the "Spit Ball" 

since the delivery, which is commonly described as the 
4, spit ball." came into use among major league and minor league 
pitchers, has it been under so much discussion as the past 
son. 

Arguments have been advanced in its favor and others have 
been offered opposing it. 

The novelty of the opposition to it in 190S was in the posi- 
tive assertion that its use was directly opposed to good fielding. 
Managers of experience insisted that important contests had 
been lost, because fielder? made wild throws when the ball came 
to them fresh from the bat. 

Another objection offered to it is that the practice is unsani- 
tary, displeasing to the sight, and not the best method to teach 
younger generation of ball players, who are growing up and 
who will one day be experts before the public. 

In order that the readers of the Guide might hear from the 
men who are in touch with the public and players, and those 
who have so much to do with expressing opinions of importance 
in regard to the great national pastime, the editor addressed the 
following questions to Base Ball critics generally throughout the 
United States : 

•■In your opinion, is the Spit Ball of so much 

-situ to tne National Game tliat you believe it 

would be a special hardship if it were eliminated? 

"Do you think its value as a pitcher's asset 
offsets the objectionable feati.res in connection with 
its use ?" 

The replies to this request for information were most interest- 
ing, and the members of the press, who were so kind as to 
express their opinions, have the hearty thanks of the editor of 
the Guide. 

The responses are published as follows : 

WM. B. HANNA, New York Sun. 

The game would not suffer in the least, according to my 
view of it. were the spit ball done away with. It is a recent 
development of Base Ball which is not calculated to have a 
lasting good effect. It may add some momentary effectiveness 
to the pitcher himself, but* not to the game as a whole. The 
sport would be quite as skillful and interesting without it — the 
batting better, probably — and. this being the case, the process 
required for the delivery is an objection not counterbalanced by 
anything — if there is anything — in favor of the spit ball. I 
should like to see it eliminated. 

J. J. KARPF. Evening Mail, New York. 

The spit ball is a great help to certain pitchers, those who 
can control it. There is no questioning its effectiveness when 
under complete control. Of course, a ball dampened with saliva 
may get beyond control of the pitcher and break badly, placing 
the batter in danger, but even this is no more dangerous than 
the speedy high incurve that some pitchers use to force a batter 
to break ground. If dampening the ball with saliva is the 
only objectionable feature, then let us have the spit ball. 




1, Schulte at bat (Bresnahan, New York, catching); 2, Evers; 3, 
Steinfeldt; 4, Chance (Devlin. New York, base-runner): 5. Kling 
(Bresnahan, New York, catching; O'Day, Umpire); 6. Hofman. 

Photos by Conlon and Pictorial News Co. 

A GROUP OF WORLD'S CHAMPIONS, 1908. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GLIDE. 39 

JOHN R. ROBINSON, Boston Traveler. 

The innovation of the spit ball into Base Ball brought about 
n which in my opinion was entirely unwarranted by 
the importance of the delivery. 

About ten per cent of the leading pitchers use this ball, while 
at least rifty per cent of the writings of Base Ball experts 
regarding the various forms of pitching are about it. It does 
not appear to me to be any great hardship to eliminate it and 
the importance of the delivery appears to warrant no special 
Ball legislation on the subject. 

The idea that the saliva adheres to the ball is foolish, as 
even the slightest foul tip would suffice to cleanse the ball. 
Not more than six pitchers in both big leagues depend upon this 
ball in emergencies, and I do not think that its elimination 
would make a material difference to more than two pitchers 
(Fraser and Howell.) in the country. 

A. H. C. MITCHELL, Boston American. 

I believe the elimination of the spit ball would work no hard- 
ship whatever on the National Game : at the same time it is a 
serious question whether it should be eliminated. If the spit 
ball were abolished it would, of course, put a lot of pitchers out 
of business, and those twirlers who survived would have to win 
their games on their merits, as it were. 

If the spit ball were eliminated I believe the pennant races 
would not be so close, especially in the American League, and 
this fact must be considered, for close races stir the interest in 
Base Ball. 

When all it said and done, however, it is a question whether 
it is really possible to abolish the spit ball. It is easy enough 
to say "Eliminate the spit ball,'' but could it be don- ? 

O. W. BROWN, Boston Traveler. 

In reply to your note regarding the spit ball. I make bold to 
reply that I do not think the playing rules would be hurt very 
much if it was eliminated entirely from the game. As for the 
liardship. its extinction could not be more harmful to the 
game than it is now. for the constant use of saliva. I believe, 
weakens the pitcher in the long run. and a man may be ever 
ng at the beginning of the season, winding up a total 
wreck so far as pitching ability goes. By no means do I con- 
sider it a valuable asset for a pitcher, and I think I am borne 
out in this statement by the assertion of such players as Bower- 
tnan. Dahlen. McGann and other fielders, besides Criger. Donahue, 
Carrigan and Smith in the catching business. George Winter 
declares that he wouldn't use a spit ball, even if he had the 
courage to try and throw one. as he does not believe it tends 
to fool a batsman. As to the objectionable features of the spit 
ball, there is no room left for argument when it comes down 
to a question of "elevating" the National Game. For one Base 
"Ball writer. I am heartily in favor of abolishing the spit ball, 
and I think the sooner it'is done the quicker pitchers who have 
gone back will regain their old-time form. 

RAY ZIEGLER. Philadelphia Record. 

In reply to request for my opinion on the spit ball. I would 
say : The spit ball is the direct cause of so many long-drawn-out 
Base Ball contests, more especially noticeable in 'the American 




1, Jennings; 2, Winter; 3, Schmidt; 4, Schaefer; 5, D Jones; 6, 

O'Leary; 7, Willett; 8, Suggs; 9, Killian. Conlon, Photo. 

A GROUP OF DETROIT PLAYERS, 1908. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 41 

League, because there are more spit ball pitchers in that organi- 
zation. There were few games played on the local American 
League grounds last season in less than two -hours. The foul 
strike rule was made to shorten Base Ball, but since it was 
adopted this objectionable spit ball feature has cropped up and 
has killed the object of the foul strike rule. We had plenty of 
good pitching before the spit ball was invented, so I do not 
think the pitchers would be put out of business should legisla- 
tion be taken against the "spitter." 

Cut out the spit ball and repeal the foul strike rule and we 
will have better hitting, which is one of the chief features of 
the game of Base Ball. 

GEO. M. GRAHAM, Philadelphia North American. 

Opponents of the spit ball overlook the fact that it would be 
impossible to formulate a rule which would do away with it. 
Base Ball men know that a pitcher seldom puts the spit on the 
ball when he raises the ball to his face. This is only a move- 
ment to deceive the batter and means a curve, or a straight ball, 
as often as a "spitter." In many cases the catcher wets the 
ball and some pitchers carry a crushed banana in the hip pocket 
and get the slippery effect thus. No matter what rule is made 
the catchers and pitchers will get the best of it. 

J. ED. GRILLO, Washington Post. 

I do not believe that the spit ball is a necessity in Base Ball. 
The game would be just as well off without it, yet I have only 
known it in one or two instances, when some novice tried to 
use it, to be objectionable. 

That it is a most effective delivery there is no doubt, and that 
it has cut deeply into the batting has been proven. But the 
game as played to-day seems to please the public, so why 
change it? 

It is usually the teams which cannot boast of a spit ball 
pitcher which declare against the spit ball, just as they would 
try to have a strong batter on the opposing team eliminated if 
it were possible. 

J. M. CUMMINGS, Baltimore News. 

First — I do not believe that the spit ball is a necessity to the 
game, nor that it would be hardship if it were a thing of the 
past. Indeed, it might be of benefit in shortening the playing 
time (which this season seems to be lengthier than ever), as 
fewer fouls would result and it might increase the patting 
slightly. 

Second — From the standpoint of the pitching, yes. I do 
believe that its assistance to the pitching talent more than 
counterbalances all of the objections that could be raised. 

Now, there you have what would seem to be two diametrically 
opposed views. Perhaps they are, yet they are consistent, for 
Base Ball is made up of two diametrically opposite halves — the 
trying to hit the pitchers and trying to get pitchers that can't 
be hit. If you want pitching, you want to keep the spit ball. 
If you want more batting, let us hope that the spit ball will 
soon become a thing of the past. 

In conclusion, I have been careful not to say that I favor 
legislation on the subject. Legislating the spit ball out of 
existence, it seems to me, would be making the legislators 




1, Cobb; 2. Donovan; 3, Rossman; 4, Thomas; 5, Coughlin; 6^ Me- 

Intyre; 7, Crawford; 8, Summers; 9, Mullin. Van Oeyen, Photo. 

A GROUP OF DETROIT PLAYERS, 1908. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 43 

ridiculous. Not only such action, but the attempts to enforce 
such action if taken would be ridiculous. 

A. R. CRATTY, Pittsburg, Pa., Correspondent of Sport- 
ing Life. 

The spit ball isn't essential to Base Ball, but its use adds 
uncertainty to the sport. Any move, within the bounds of 
reason, tending to bring about such a condition is of value to 
that recreation. The spit ball has objectionable features, that is 
true ; but if the Base Ball going public would be so kind as to 
hand it a more sanitary name, perhaps much of this objection 
would subside. There are other sports which develop conditions 
not exactly admirable, but then they do not sail under nauseating 
terms. 

JAMES J. LONG, Pittsburg Sun. 

I most certainly do not consider the spit ball essential to the 
progress of Base Ball. Its effectiveness against batsmen at times 
cannot be denied, but I believe that any possible loss to the 
pitching profession that might result from its elimination would 
be more than offset by the fact that the national sport had been 
cleansed of an objectionable, if not actually offensive feature. 
Aside from that I believe that in their knowledge of the spit 
ball's effectiveness young pitchers will not strive so hard to 
acquire genuine pitching skill, and that as a result the art, 
which is such a grand feature of the game, will suffer in the 
end. I am most heartily in favor of any legislation looking to 
the elimination of the spit ball. 

RALPH S. DAVIS, Pittsburg Press. 

I believe the spit ball should be abolished by the rule makers. 
It is a freak delivery, and is not being used by the high-class 
twirlers, but is confined generally to those pitchers who need 
some trick to keep them in the game. The spit ball handicaps 
the hitters and spoils the fielding, inasmuch as the slippery con- 
dition of the ball leads to numerous errors that would otherwise 
be missing. I cannot see where its elimination would inflict any 
special hardships on the pitchers, who have always in the past 
been able quickly to overcome any handicaps that were placed 
upon them. 

C. B. POWER, Pittsburg Dispatch. 

First — The spit ball, in my opinion, is not a necessity. It is 
an evil, and as such should be eliminated from an otherwise 
clean sport. The pitcher who cannot succeed without resorting 
to the spit ball should step aside. In addition to its other 
disagreeable features, the spit ball delays action, and action — 
plenty of it — is what Base Ball fans demand. 

Second — Some of the grandest twirlers the game has ever 
known manage to get along without resorting to the spit ball, 
therefore, I do not believe it to be such a valuable . asset as 
claimed by some. 

C. H. ZUBER, Cincinnati Times-Star. 

I have always regarded the spit ball as a sort of "dog-faced 
boy" of Base Ball — one of the freaks that was not at all essen- 
tial to the "big show." 




1, McGraw; 2, Donlin; 3, Doyle; 4, Herzog; 5, Taylor. 

Photos by Conlon and Pictorial News Co. 

A GROUP OF NEW YORK NATIONALS, 1908. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 45 

It keeps a few pitchers in fast company who could not remain 
there if they relied entirely upon "sanitary" pitching for their 
success. As comparatively few pitchers use it, there's much 
evidence that it could be eliminated without injuring the great 
National Game. 

As to its objectionable features, I've always had a horror for 
seeing even children put soiled fingers into their mouths, and 
that horror is not lessened by the increased size of the offender. 

REN MULFORD, JR., Cincinnati Correspondent of 
Sporting Life. 

There's something creepy and "slimy" in the very suggestion 
of the spit ball. Perhaps if it were called the "salivated shoot," 
the moist delivery would have better credentials for discussion 
in good society. No matter what may be said for and against 
the much-debated slant, it can never be given a rating as con- 
ducive to clean ball. A slobber-coated sphere cannot be very 
pleasant to handle, and from the number of oreide throws that 
have been made by fielders into whose hands the elusive damp- 
ened leather has fallen, it isn't always,, easy to throw well. 

The well-being of Base Ball does f not hinge upon either the 
retention or elimination of the spit ball. Undoubtedly its 
abolition would work a special hardship on a large number 
of pitchers who have found the % spit ball a life preserver, 
which has enabled them to remain in fast company longer than 
they could possibly have done had they not been 1 aided by this 
mode of delivery. There is nothing very pleasant in the sight 
of a big fellow emptying the contents of his face upon a ball 
held close to his mouth, but the majority of the "bugs" don't 
object if the shower results in the . annihilation of the other 
fellows. Frankly, I don't like the spit ball, but it hasn't 
enough objectionable features to prevent me from enjoying a 
victory in which it figures as a pitcher's asset. 

JACK RYDER, Cincinnati Enquirer. 

In reply to your query as to the spit ball, will say that I 
see no valid reason why it should be eliminated, even if it 
should be practical to do so. If pitchers evolve a method of 
increasing their effectiveness, without violating present rules, 
I believe that they are entitled to exploit it. The spit ball is 
not a handsome beast, but Base Ball is not a particularly 
aesthetic pastime. To be consistent, a rule prohibiting the spit 
ball would have to be supplemented by legislation against the 
prevailing practice of rubbing the hands in the dirt before 
going to bat, and even spitting on them. A rule against the ugg 
of the spitter would be hard to enforce, and I cannot see its 
advisability. 

EDWARD F. BANG, Cleveland News. 

I beg to state that I have always been opposed to the use of 
the spit ball in Base Ball in that it has very many objectionable 
features. In a majority of cases where the spit ball is used the 
games are long drawn out affairs. Fans prefer the fast, snappy 
games and don't care' to see a pitcher waste a half minute or so 
in slobbering all over a ball. 

Again, if the spit ball is legislated out of existence I think 
the batting will increase. Base Ball was intended to be played 




1, Mathewson; 2, Merkle; 3, Tenney; 4, Bridwell. 

Photos by Tebbs and Pictorial News Co. 

A GROUP OF NEW YORK NATIONALS, 1908. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 47 

with a dry ball. It is bad enough if a game is continued during 
a slight rain, but the original idea and intention was to play 
the game with a dry-covered ball, instead of one made loggy and 
heavy by the frequent use of spit. 

I do not think its value as a pitcher's asset approaches the 
many objectionable features in connection with its use. 

HENRY P. EDWARDS, Cleveland Plain Dealer. 

It is my opinion that the spit ball should be done away with. 
It was only a few years ago that the foul strike rule was 
adopted in order to shorten the games and yet the spit ball, 
which lengthens the exhibitions, is allowed to stand. This dis- 
gusting practice has made effective pitchers of men who have 
neither brains nor skill, and I do not believe that outside of 
the spit ball pitchers a single person can be found who will 
countenance its use. More wild throws have followed its use 
and catchers are much more liable to be hurt. 

PAUL H. BRUSKE, Detroit Times. 

Base Ball would be all the better off with, the spit ball elimin- 
ated. Its use implies a process disgusting, unsanitary and tend- 
ing toward a delay of the progress of a game. 

The increased efficiency of the fielders when handling a dry 
ball about balances the added effectiveness which the spit ball 
gives to a few pitchers and makes the game far more attractive, 
from a spectacular point of view. 

There are plenty of good, orthodox pitchers to take care of the 
batsmen with the standard style of delivery. 

If a pitcher is allowed to spit on the ball, why should not his 
opponents have the right to apply to the sphere some sort of 
antidote, and where is the whole process going to legally stop? 

W. A. PHELON, Chicago Journal. 

I can't see how the spit ball can be wholly done away with. 
The pitchers would be slipping them over just the same, if they 
had to wear pieces of soaked sponge in their gloves. 

The spit ball is an evil, so far as batting averages are con- 
cerned, but its terrors are over-estimated. Scienced batters who 
will step into it and meet it before it breaks can slug it heavily, 
and should treat it just as they would any ordinary drop ball. 

While the spit ball is sloppy, dirty and disgusting, it is, I fear, 
impossible to get rid of. 

GEORGE C. RICE, Chicago News. 

The spit ball is the stock in trade of many pitchers. It would 
be a great hardship to those pitchers to have their best delivery 
eliminated. I think it would be a great injustice to legislate any 
pitcher out of business. In law it is unconstitutional to legislate 
any person or corporation out of business. 

There are many drawbacks to the spit ball. The handling of 
it is difficult and even filthy. The pitcher, however, who masters 
the control of this difficult ball should be allowed by all means 
to use it in my belief. There are plenty ways of handicapping 
pitchers without eliminating a certain delivery. In the spirit 
of fairness I say let the spit ball alone. 




1, Stovall; 2, N. Clarke; 3, Bradley; 4, J. Clarke; 5, Altizer; 6, 
W. Hinchman; 7, Lajoie; 8, Turner; 9, Bemis; 10, Joss: 11, Leib- 
hardt; 12, Rhoades. Van Oeyen, Photo. 

A GROUP OF CLEVELAND PLAYERS, 1908. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 49 

CHAS. A. HUGHES, Chicago Record-Herald. 

It would be unfair to attempt to legislate the spit ball out of 
Ball. What would be done with the increasing number of 
pitchers who depend for their living almost entirely on that 
delivery? 

An y skill which a pitcher develops he is entitled to make use 
of. The rule makers, at least the practical men on those com- 
mittees, I don't think would ever legislate an athlete out of 
business bv eliminating the spitter. Also, I doubt if the rule 
makers could prevent the spit ball. The pitchers would get 
around the rule in some way. It would be too hard to draw 
the line. 

I. E. SANBORN, Chicago Tribune. 

I do not believe the spit ball is a necessity in Base Ball, but 
do believe its elimination would be in the nature of class legis- 
lation which just now is so unpopular. In other words, it would 
work a special hardship to individuals instead of a general hard- 
ship to all. To my mind the elimination would be more difficult 
to accomplsh than unjust. My experience with Base Ball fans 
leads to the view that the objectionable features of the spit ball 
are centered largely in the diminution of batting, which it 
entails, rather than in any sanitary or aesthetic view of the 
workings of the salivary adjunct. An increase of batting is no 
doubt desired, and it would be better insured by placing a 
handicap, as nearly equal as possible, on all pitchers, rather than 
upon a certain class or style of delivery. 

E. G. WESTLAKE, Chicago Post. 

Permit me to say emphatically that instead of a hardship the 
elimination of the spit ball would be a blessing to the National 
Game. It is only a questionable pitching asset at its best, and 
exploited by the most efficient twirlers. Even the latter, once 
rather verbose in praising it, are strangely silent in view of the 
way batsmen occasionally slam their delivery. If legislation 
aimed toward saving a few minutes lost in the act of soiling 
new balls, is popular, how much more popular would be legis- 
lation — if it is possible — that would eliminate the interminable 
delays and the nuisances of spit ball delivery? Two opposing 
twirlers using the saliva style of delivery will make a game 
longer than "Nig" Cuppy ever thought he could stretch one 
out. 

JAMES C. GILRUTH, Chicago News. 

The spit ball, in my opinion, is not of such necessity to Base 
Ball that it could not be eliminated. In fact, I believe that by 
legislating against it batting would materially increase. 

But why should that form of delivery be prohibited any more 
than the curve ball, change of pace, or any other style developed 
for the sole purpose of stopping batting? To my mind such laws 
would savor of class legislation. 

There is a hue and cry against the spit ball to-day, just as 
there was against the curve ball when it was introduced, against 
the foul strike rule, and as there always will be against any 
innovation that means progress in the game. 

To eliminate the spit ball from Base Ball would spell retro- 
gression just as much as to bar pitchers from curving the ball, 




|1, Wagner; 2, Wagner at bat (Jacklitsch, of Philadelphia, catching); 
,3, Storke; 4, Camnitz; 5, Abbaticchio; 6, Thomas. Richter, Photo. 

A GROUP OF PITTSBURG PLAYERS, 1908. 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 51 

using the drop or any other form of delivery for deceiving the 
batsman. 

The spit ball is here to stay, in my opinion, though I believe 
that in the past it has been used injudiciously, pitchers need- 
lessly injuring their arms by its excessive use. 

It is undoubtedly a valuable asset to some pitchers, and I fall 
to see any serious objectionable features in its use. Few do, 
except the batter who cannot hit it. 

MYRON W. TOWNSEND, St. Louis Star-Chronicle. 

Bar the spit ball. To give the pitcher an artificial advantage 
over the batter does not smack of good sportsmanship. To wet 
the ball with saliva, slippery elm or any foreign substance is 
"delaying," disgusting and damaging to the corner-stone of Base 
Ball — fair play. 

"Ace in the hole" deliveries, where twirlers smear the ball 
with "doctored" gastric juice, is at direct variance to the intent 
and purposes of the founders of the National Game. Every- 
thing about Base Ball should be "above board." 

Fair-minded fans demand a dry ball. To permit the pitcher 
to give the ball a bath is artificial, unfair. 

The good of the game as a whole and not the selfish interests 
of a few dictates that this illegal delivery should be legislated 
out of existence. Disbarring the spit ball might work a tem- 
porary hardship on a few unresourceful twirlers, but most of 
them would quickly adjust themselves to the new conditions. 

H. W. LANIGAN, St. Louis Times. 

Into the cuspidor with the spit ball. It has hurt batting; 
frequently hurts fielding and more or less it is disgusting. Rules, 
such as bringing the catcher up behind the bat, the foul strike, 
and not permitting pitcher to soil the ball have livened up the 
game and improved it. A "spitter" generally works slowly. 
The delivery is the only artificial thing in the game. Scratch 
it — throw it into the cuspidor. 

WILL McKAY, Cleveland Leader. 

I believe that no especial hardship would be worked if the 
spit ball were eliminated, in fact I favor such action. It delays 
the game and certainly has had a very bad effect on the hitting. 

I believe that most of the pitchers now using the "spitter" 
could go back to the old style without much inconvenience. 
Some of the twirlers have been helped wonderfully by its use, 
but I believe its abolition would be a boon to the game and 
would meet with the approval of the players in general. 

GYM BAGLEY, New York Evening Mail. 

There is only one answer regarding the value of the spit ball 
as a pitcher's asset— if he wins with it, it has no objectionable 
feature ; if he loses, it has nothing else. 




AUGUST HERRMANN 

H. C. PULLIAM Chairman B. B. JOHNSON 

John E. Bruce, Secretary 

THE NATIONAL COMMISSION. 



SFALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 53 

World's Championship Series, 1908 

By Charles A. Hughes, Chicago 

"Take your team to Detroit and open the World's 
iSeries there on Saturday/' 

That was the terse telegram received by Manager Chance of 
the Cubs at 7 o'clock on the evening of Thursday, October 8 
last, after the Chicago Nationals had won their third League 
pennant by defeating the New York Giants, 4 to 2, in a 
desperate encounter at the Polo Grounds. 

And on the following Wednesday night the Cubs had been 
proclaimed Champions of the World for the second consecutive 
season. They had defeated the American League champions 
in four out of five games, and so decisively was the trick 
turned that even the most loyal friends of the band of Tigers, 
ruled over by Hugh Jennings, kowtowed to the Cubs and 
bestowed upon them full credit for a magnificent victory. 

The opening game played In Detroit, October 10, was won by 
the cubs, 10 to 6. It was a seething conflict, with the score 
zigzagging back and forth in favor of first one team and then 
the other. The 10,812 fans, who sat through a drizzling rain 
to watch the rivals for world's honors, thought Detroit was 
a sure winner when the Cubs went to bat in the ninth inning 
with the score 6 to 5 against them. But with one man out, 
the Cubs began a batting rally which broke all records for 
slugging in games of such importance. Six men in a row 
smashed out base hits, and all but one of them scored. 

Another similar batting feat characterized the second game, 
played in Chicago the following day (Sunday). For seven 
innings "Wild Bill" Donovan of the Detroits held the Cubs 
utterly helpless by his magic curves. Overall was baffling the 
Tigers just as effectively, if not in such spectacular manner. 
However, in the eighth inning Joe Tinker smashed the ball 
ever the right field fence at the crucial moment and before 
the storm of base hits subsided six of the Cubs had stung the 
ball safely and every one of them scored. 

The contestants remained in Chicago another day, and on 
Monday the Tigers won their only game, Mullin's splendid 
pitching giving him a victory over Pfiester, 8 to 3. Mullin 
richly deserved a shut-out, but the Tigers made some fiendish 
errors in the fourth inning and handed the Cubs all their runs. 

Like the other games, the third on the list was featured by 
one inning of hard hitting. The Tigers got five hits and five- 
runs in the sixth session. 

On Monday night the teams traveled back to Detroit for 
two more games and the pair proved just enough to end the 
series, the Cubs winning both over the shut-out route. 

Overall completed the job on Wednesday by blanking the 
Detroits, 2 to 0. Donovan was depended on by the Tigers, who 
were making their last-ditch stand, but "Wild Bill" was not 
nearly as effective as he had been in the early part of the 
Sunday game, and in all ten hits were made off his delivery. 

As far as mere pitching is concerned Overall was the hardest 
man for the Tigers to hit. In the final game they could do 
nothing with his curves, which were breaking in most dazzling 
style. Ten of the Detroit players struck out trying to negotiate 
lhat famous low drop, which he kept placing on the outside 
vt the plate with wonderful accuracy. 




Managers Chance and Jennings. 




President Murphy and Manager Chance in Conference. 
SCENES AT WORLD'S CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES, 1908. 



SrALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 55 

Manager Jennings had a few things to contend with during 
the series that didn't bother Chance. Chief of those was a 
new line-up with which to begin the series and later another 
important switch in positions. 

The Tigers had finished the American League season with 
Lush, a recruit from the Indianapolis team, playing shortstop. 
He did excellent work in the closing stages of the race, and 
perhaps without him the Detroit team would have been unable 
to land the flag. At least, that is the feeling among Detroit 
fans. But Bush was ineligible for the World's Series, as he 
had not been under contract to Detroit the required length of 
time. So Charlie O'Leary was compelled to re-enter the game 
with a badly damaged throwing hand. Bush had become quite 
an important cog in the Tiger machine, and he undoubtedly 
was missed, although O'Leary gave a good account of himself 

After two games had been played Jennings was forced to 
weaken his team by another change in the line-up. Downs, - 
at second base, couldn't touch the Cub base runners. They slid 
and wriggled away from him to such an alarming degree that 
the manager of the Tigers retired Downs after the second 
game, brought Schaefer from third to second and put Coughlin 
on third, the latter's batting weakness being most conspicuous, 

A brief glance at the official averages of the series will 
convince anybody why the Cubs won. Reduced to the proposi- 
tion of cold figures, the supremacy of the National Leaguers 
stands out more boldly than on the playing -field. Chance's 
team outhit the Tigers almost 100 points ; stole nearly three 
times as many bases ; made only half as many errors, and par- 
ticularly did they excel in team play. 

Brown and Overall were credited with all the victories 
secured by the Cubs. Unquestionably, their work was the most 
deadly to Detroit's hopes, Reulbach and Pfiester not upholding 
the standard quite so well. 

□ □ □ 

Only one of the games was marred by inclement 
pi dot weather, and that happened to be the opening 

r^AKAc clash at Detroit > Saturday, October 10. Just as 

GAME. the Tigers took the field to begin their practice 

rain began falling and continued until the finish. 

On several occasions the downpour threatened to terminate the 

battle, but Umpire Sheridan kept the teams going and the Cubs 

finally pulled out victors by the score of 10 to 6. 

Sheckard started the finish of Killian with a two-bagger 
over first base. Evers beat a bunt to Schaefer and Schulte's 
clean hit to right scored Sheckard with the tying run and nut 
Evers on second. Chance hit to Killian and Evers was forced 
at third in a fine play, but Steinfeldt uncorked another single 
and Schulte scored, with Chance taking third. 

When Killian passed Hofman, Jennings sent Summers to the 
rescue. Tinker forced Hofman at second with a grounder to 
Downs, but Chance came home on the play. After Tinker stole 
second, Kling hit to Schaefer, who fumbled, and Steinfeldt 
scored the fourth run of the inning. Kling was caught stealing. 

Summers proved invincible to the Cubs until the seventh, 
when Evers beat out a hit along the first base line, which 
nobody fielded. Schulte sacrificed Evers ahead and Downs' 
fumble of Chance's grounder put him on third. Steinfeldt hit 
a long fly to Crawford and Evers scored. Chance tried to make 
second after the catch and succeeded only because Downs was 
slow in touching him with the ball. That was one of the 
reasDns why Jennings benched Downs two days later. 



•FFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 57 

: oit rally in the seventh with a hit, 

which shot «»iY the pitchei —man planted a short 

in center. Cobb racing to third, but Schaefer fanned 

1 Tinker threw more cold water on 

the rally. How< - mldt'fl out had scored Cobb. Downs 

d the drooping hopes by hitting a hard doable to left, 

which scored Rossman. 

Change by this time was cautioning Reulbach to be careful, 

and when Summers — one of the weakest batsmen in the busi- 

>wbs with a single to center, Chance called 

II to the box. The new pitcher was wild and hit 

tyre, but retired the side when O'Leary hit a fly to Schulte. 

With only one run needed to tie, the Tigers came back for 

more gore in the eighth — and got it. Overall passed Crawford, 

the first hitter, and Chance decided Brown was needed in that 

dire emergency. The three-fingered star came in as Cobb 

sauntered to the bat. Brown began operations by making a 

wild pitch, which put Crawford on second. Cobb laid down a 

bunt, and Chance's muff of Brown's nurried throw saved Cobb 

and put Crawford on third. 

The crowd was uproarious at the sudden turn of events, and 
when Rossman smashed a hard single to center, scoring Craw- 
with the tying run, the air was filled with hats, flags, 
canes and umbrellas. Cobb's speed came to light again right 
here. He turned second like a flash and kept all sails set for 
third. Evers was caught off his guard. He received Hofman's 
throw-in. but didn't imagine Cobb would take such a chance 
with nobody out. When Evers discovered Cobb dashing for 
third he was so surprised that he threw wild to Steinfeldt. 
The ball went into the crowd and Cobb scored the run, which 
put Detroit into the lead. 

The explosion in the Cubs' half of the ninth was a most 
astonishing exhibition of slugging. When Evers, who led off 
in the ninth, was thrown out by Summers, it looked like a 
moral certainty that the Tigers would be able to retire the 
next two men and bag the game. One hit followed another 
and Chicago scored five runs. The official score : 

FIRST GAME (AT DETROIT-. OCTOBER 10. 
CniCi Detroit. 

AB.R.H.P.A.E. AB.R.H.P.A.E. 

Sheckard. 1. f 6 1 3 1 1 Mclntyre, I. f 3 1 2 3 1 

4 1 2 2 2 1 O'Leary. ss 4 1 1 3 

Schulte. r. f 4 2 2 1 Crawford, c. f 4 1 4 

- 1 12 1 Cobb, r. f 4 2 2 1 

Steinfeldt. 3b 3 2 2 Rossman. lb 4 1 2 12 

Hofman. c. f 4 1 1 4 Schaefer. 3b 3 1 2 



Tinker, ss 5 1 2 4 

Klins. c 3 1 7 1 

Reulbach, p 3 4 

Overall, p 1 



Schmidt, c 4 4 1 

Downs. 2b 4 1 1 2,4 1 

Killian. p 1 

Summers, p 3 1 5 " 



Brown, p 2 *Jones 1 

f Thomas 1 1 



Totals 37 10 14 _" 



talfl 36 6 10 27 16 4 

Chicago 4 1 3—10 

Detroit 1 3 2 0—6 

* Tones batted fo« Simmers in ninth inning. 

t Thomas batted for O'Leary in ninth inning; Winter ran for 
Thomas. 

Left on bases — Chicago 9. Detroit 7. Stolen bases — Chance 2. Hof- 
man, Mclntyre. Two-base hits— Sheckard 2. Downs. Sacrifice hits— 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



59 



Evers, Schulte, Sling, Brown, Cobb, Schaefcr, Steinfoldt. Hits— On* 
Reulbach, 8 ill 6 2-3 innings; off Overall, in 1-3 inning; off Brown, 
2 in 2 innings; off Killian, 5 in 2 1-3 inning; off Summers, 9 in 6 2-3 
innings (Brown credited with victory, Summers with defeat). Struck 
out for Chicago — Bj' Reulbach, O'Leary, Summers, Crawford, Ross- 
man, Schaefer; by Brown, Jones; total 6. Struck out for Detroit — 
By Killian, Evers; by Summers, Reulbach, Overall; total 3. First on 
balls— Off Overall, Crawford; off Brown, Mclntyre; off Killian, Chance, 
Hofman. Kling; off Summers, Steinfeldt. Wild pitch— Brown. Hit 
by pitcher— Mclntyre. by Overall. Fumbles — Downs, Schaefer, Cobb. 
Wild throws— Mclntyre. Evers. Muffed thrown ball— Chance. First on 
errors— Chicago 2, Detroit 1. Time, 2.10. Umpires— Sheridan and 
O'Day. Official scorers— Richter and Flanner. Attendance— 10,812. 

D D □ 

The second game was played in Chicago on 
SECOND Sunday, cool, ciear weather taking the place of 
r- a ka c tile rani - r ^ ne biggest crowd of the series turned 
GAME. out. but even the figures of 17,760 were disap- 
pointing. For seven innings the battle between 
"Wild Bill" Donovan and "Big Jeff" Overall w r as a display of 
the highest twirling art. 

With the count still standing to 0, Donovan collapsed in the 
eighth inning and became as easy for the Cubs as he had been 
difficult in the early rounds. 

Donovan looked as strong as ever when he struck Steinfeldt 
out to start the eighth. Next he had some hard luck. Hofman, 
swinging -vith all his strength, dribbled a puny hit down the 
third base line wnich couldn't be handled in time. He was safe 
at first. Tinker did the rest. 

The Cubs' great shortstop, who had been the bugbear of all 
the National League twirlers during the season, rose to the 
occasion and hoisted the ball over the right field fence for a 
home run, scoring Hofman ahead of him. 

That awful wallop won the game, but to make it good the 
Cubs kept on hitting and tallied six runs. 

The Tigers saved themselves from the whitewash in the ninth. 
Jennings sent Davy Jones to bat for O'Leary, and he walked. 
Crawford's out put Jones on second, whence he scored on Cobb's 
single to center. The official score : 

SECOND GAME (AT CHICAGO), OCTOBER 11. 



Detroit. 

AB.R.H.F.A.E. 



Mclntyre, 1. f 4 

O'Leary, ss 3 

Crawford, c. f 4 

Cobb, r. f 4 

Rossman, lb 4 

Schaefer, 3b 3 

Schmidt, c 3 

Downs, 2b 2 

Donovan, p 2 

*Jones 1 



3 
1 
4 



Totals 29 1 4 24 



Chicago. 

AB.R.H.P.A.E. 



Sheckard, 1. f 4 

Evers, 2b 4 

Schulte, r. f 4 

Chance, lb 3 

Steinfeldt, 3b 4 

Hofman, c. f 3 

Tinker, ss 3 

Kling, c 

Overall, p. .. 



1 
1 1 

12 



3 10 



Totals 31 6 7 27 13 1 



Detroit 1—1 

Chicago 6 x— 6 

* Jones batted for O'Leary in ninth inning. 

Left on bases— Detroit 4, Chicago 2. Stolen bases— Sheckard, Evers, 
Chance; total 3. Sacrifice hits— Donovan. Two-base hits— Kling. 



r«t f 




Steinfeidt making a hit. 




Joe Tinker making a bit. 
WORLD'S CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES— SCENES AT CHICAGO. 



SrALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



61 



THIRD 
GAME 



Three -base hit— Schulte. Home run—Tinker. Double plays— For 
Detroit, Downs, O'Leary, Rossman. For Chieajfo— Tinker and Chance. 

.struck out— By Doilovan, Schulte. Ilofinan, Kling 2, Steinfeldt 2, 
Chance: total 7. By Overall, Mclntyre 2, O'Leary, Downs 2; total 5. 
Bases >»n balls— Off Donovan. Chance; off Overall, Downs, Jones. 
Wild pitch— Donovan. First base on errors — Chicago 1. Muffed thrown 
ball— Donovan. Wild throw— Chance. Time— 1.30. Umpires— Klem and 
Connolly. Official scorers— Richter and Flanner. Attendance— 
17.7o0. 

D □ □ 

* Detroit's only victory in the series was scored 

in Chicago the following day. Mullin's superb 
pitching and Cobb's splendid hitting being the 
deciding factors. Detroit got away in the lead, 
O'Leary scoring in the first inning on Steinfeldt's 
wide throw to Chance, Crawford's out and Cobb's hit to left. 
It was not until the fourth that the Cubs could get started, 
and in that round they scored three runs on some foolish errors. 
Sheckard struck out, but Evers walked. Schulte fouled out and 
Mullin caught Evers off first, but Rossman threw wild to 
second and Evers was saved. Chance stole and scored when 
Coughlin's wild throw to first was followed by Rossman's 
wretched heave to the plate to get the Cub manager. Hofman 
inserted a clean three-bagger, scoring Steinfeldt. 

Pfiester, meantime, had been pitching dazzling ball, but the 
Tigers surprised the crowd by overcoming Chicago's lead. 

With the bases filled and none out, Crawford whacked a 
vicious hit at Chance, which the manager couldn't quite handle, 
Mullin scoring. Cobb scratched a hit just out of Pfiester's 
reach, which Tinker, also, failed to handle in time, Mclntyre 
scoring. 

Rossman hit another liner at Chance and again "Husk" failed 
to make a play on the ball. He knocked it down but couldn't 
pick it up and both O'Leary and Crawford scored, with Cobb 
tearing around to third. On Schaefer's short fly to Hofman, 
Cobb was doubled, trying to score. After a mess of infield hits, 
Thomas connected for a clean two-bagger to right center and 
Rossman scored. Evers threw out Coughlin to end the round. 
The official score : 

THIRD GAME (AT CHICAGO), OCTOBER 12. 



Detroit. 

AB.R.H.P.A.E, 



Mclntyre, 1. f 4 

O'Leary, ss 4 

Crawford, c. f 5 

Cobb, r. f 5 

Rossman, lb 4 

Schaefer, 2b c . 4 

Thomas, c *. 3 

Coughlin, 3b 3 

Mullin, p 3 



2 2 



1 



1 1 



Totals 35 8 11 27 12 4 



Chicago. 

AB.R.H.P.A.E. 



Sheckard, 1. f 4 

Evers, 2b 3 

Schulte, r. f 4 

Chance, lb 4 

Steinfeldt, 3b 4 

Hofman, c. f 4 

Tinker, ss 3 

Kling, c 3 

Pfeister, p 2 

Reulbach, p 

♦Howard 1 



1 

1 

1 1 

2 14 
1 1 
















2 3 



Totals 32 3 7 27 15 



Detroit 1 5 2 0—8 

Chicago 3 0—3 

* Howard batted for Pfiester in eighth inning. 

Left on bases— Detroit 6, Chicago 3. First on errors— Detroit 2, 
Chicago 1. Stolen bases— Cobb 2, Rossman, Chance 2, Steinfeldt. Two- 





w *■ 

m3jL 


. 1( 


flr? ; "' 


:■■ ; 


«« "^ If 


; • %.. * . -; 


lT^ 


' ""^^**J ' • ; *^M 


•;;., -" t . . . t ^ 



Jennings discussing Tinker's home run with the umpire. 




O'Leary running to first. 
WORLD'S CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES— SCENES AT CHICAGO. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



63 



aas, Cobb. Three-base hit— Hofman. Sacrifice hits— 
Un. Hits — Off Ptiester 10 in 8 innings; Reulbach 1 in 
le plays— For Detroit. Schaefer and Rossman: Schaefer, 



base hits— Thomas, Cobb. 
O'Leary, Coughlin 

1 inning. Double piays — t or ueiron, oeuaeier aim ciubsuiuu . ovunexer, 
O'Leary and Rossman. For Chicago — Evers and Chance; Hofman and 
Kling. Struck out— By Mullin. Sheckard 2. Steinfeldt 2, Hofman, 
Tinker, Ptiester 2; total 8. By Pfiester, Coughlin. Bases on balls- 
Off Mullin, Evers. Off Pfiester, Mclntyre, Thomas. Mullin. Off 
Reulbach, Rossman. Fumbles— O'Leary, Chance, .Steinfeldt. Wild 
throws— Coughlin, Rossman 2. Umpires— O'Day and Sheridan. Time— 
2.10.* Scorers— Richter and Flannel*. Attendance— 14,543. 

D D □ 

Just one play by Mordecai Brown put the Tigers 
FOURTH out ot tne running for the fourth game, which was 

^akjc- P laved in Detroit, Tuesday, October 13. In that 

GAME contest the Detroits had only one good chance for 
runs, and Brown spoiled that by one of the most 
remarkable bits of fielding ever seen on a ball field. 

The Tigers were not done for until Brown's grand play 
in the fourth inning. O'Leary started off that period with 
a clean hit to left and Crawford pushed another single to the 
same territory. With Cobb and Rossman coming to bat it 
looked as though Brown's margin of two runs would be wiped 
out. 

Brown knew Cobb would bunt and, realizing the speed of that 
fellow, decided to make a play for O'Leary at third instead of 
for the sacrifice hitter. Brown pitched a ball on the outside 
of the plate just where Cobb wanted it for a bunt. As he 
pitched, Brown dashed toward the third base line. Everything 
worked out just as the twirler had planned. Cobb did bunt 
and the ball squirmed down the base line. Brown was upon 
it in a twinkling, snatched it up, whirled and cut loose with a 
powerful throw to Steinfeldt. 

Brown kept on pitching splendidly and Detroit never had 
another chance, four hits being their total for the day. O'Leary 
and Crawford making all of them. The Cubs picked up another 
run in the ninth after two were out. Evers singled and stole, 
Schulte walked and on Cobb's muff of Chance's fly to right, 
Evers tallied. The official score : 

FOURTH GAME (AT DETROIT), OCTOBER 13. 



Chicago. 



AB.R.H.P.A.E. 



Sheckard, 1. f. 
Evers, 2b. ..... 

Schulte, r. f.. 
Chance, lb. 
Steinfeldt. 3b. 
Hofman. c. f. 
Tinker. 

Kling, c 

Brown, p 





1 

2 



4 4 



Totals 35 3 10 27 19 



Chicago 

Detroit 



Detroit. 

AB.R.H.T.A.E. 



Mclntyre, 1. f 4 

O'Leary, ss 4 

Crawford, c. f 4 

Cobb, r. f 3 

Rossman, lb 3 

Schaefer, 2b 3 

Schmidt, c 3 

Coughlin, 3b 2 

Summers, p 2 

Winter, p 

♦Jones 1 



2 2 
2 2 
1 
12 



Totals 
) 2 

I l 



.29 



4 27 





1—3 

0—0 



* Jones batted for Summers in eighth inning. 

Left on bases— Chicago 10, Detroit 3. First base on errors— Chicago 
Two-base hit— Crawford. Sacrifice hit— Steinfeldt. Hits— Off Sum- 




From left to right — Captain Coughlin, Umpire Connolly, Manager 
Chance, Mclntyre, Cobb. 




From left to right — Umpire Sheridan, Manager Chance, Manager 
Jennings, Captain Coughlin, Cobb. 

SCENES AT WORLD'S CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES, 1908. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 65 

mors 9 in 8 innirgs, off Winter 1 in 1 inning. Double play— Brown, 
Tinker, Chance. Stolen bases— Schulte 2. Evers, Hofman. Bases on 
balls— Off Summers, Schulte. Chance. Sheckard; off Winter. Schulte. 
Struck out— By Brown, Cobb, Rossmah, Schaefer, Summers total 4. 
By Summers, Sheckard, Evers, Tinker, Brown 2; total 5. Passed 
balls— Kling, Schmidt. Muffed fly— Cobb. Hit by pitched ball— By 
Brown, Coughlin. Umpires— Connolly and Klem. Time— 1.35. Scorers— 
Richter and Flanner. Attendance— 12.907. 

D D D 

It needed only one more effort for the Cubs to 
FIFTH clinch their second title of World's Champions, 
^ MWfT an d on the following day. Wednesday, they shut 
GAME. the Tigers out. 2 to 0. Overall and "Wild Bill" 

Donovan facing each other again. 
The Tigers had just two chances in the game for runs and 
fell down both times. Overall being too strong for them in the 
pinches. Mclntyre walked to start Detroit's first round, and 
after O'Leary struck out, Crawford singled to center, Hofman 
nearly, turning the hit into a phenomenal out. Cobb also 
struck out and so did Rossman. But Rossman's third strike 
hit the ground and bounded away from Kling. the batsman 
making first. With the bases filled, Schaefer had a chance to 
win renown, but was utterly fooled on three strikes. 

Detroit's last chance for a run came in its half of the fifth. 
Coughlin scratched a hit to Steinfeldt and. after Donovan 
struck out. Mclntyre pulled a hot two-bagger over first, placing 
Coughlin on third. A hit from either O'Leary or Crawford 
would have tied the game, but the former lifted a short fly 
to center and Crawford fanned. And never again did the 
Tigers come close to a tally. The official score : 

FIFTH GAME (AT DETROIT), OCTOBER 14. 



Chicago. 

AB.R.H.P.A.E. 

Sheckard, I. f 3 n l 2 

Evers. 2b 4 1 3 2 3 

Schulte. r. f 3 1 



Detroit. 

AB.R.H.P.A.E. 

Mclntyre, 1. f 3 1 2 

O'Leary. ss 4 2 2 

Crawford, c. f 4 1 3 



Chance, lb 4 3 11 i Cobb, r. f 3 1 

Steinfeldt. 3b 2 3 1 Rossman, lb. 4 7 3 

Hofman. c. f 4 2 | Schaefer. 2b 3 3 1 

Tinker, ss 4 1 1 4 I Schmidt, c 4 5 4 G 

Kling. c 3 1 9 2 l Coughlin, 3b 3 1 2 1 

Overall, p 2 1 I Donovan, p 2 1 1 



Totals 29 2 10 27 12 ' Totals 30 3*26 12 

Chicago 1 1 0—2 

Detroit 0—0 

* Overall out, hit by batted ball. 

Left on bases— Chicago 6, Detroit 7. Two-base hits— Evers. Mclntyre. 
Sacrifice hits- -Schulte, Steinfeldt, Overall. Stolen base— Donovan. 
Struck out— By Overall. O'Leary. Crawford, Cobb. Rossman 2, 
Schaefer 2. Schmidt 2, Donovan; total 10. By Donovan— Steinfeldt, 
Hofman 2; total 3. Bases on balls— Off Overall. Mclntyre, Cobb, 
Donovan. Schaefer; total 4. Off Donovan— Steinfeldt. Sheckard, 
Kling; total 3. Double plays— Schmidt and Schaefer; O'Leary. Ross- 
man and Coughlin. Wild pitch— Overall. Umpires— Sheridan and 
O'Day. Official scorers— Richter and Flanner. Time— 1.25. Attend- 
ance-^. 210. 




F. C. RICHTER, 
Editor "Sporting Life," Philadelphia, and, with A. J. Flanner of the 
St. Louis "Sporting News," Official Scorer World's Championship Series. 

JOHN A. HEYDLER, ROBERT McROY, 

Secretary-Treasurer National League. Secretary American League. 




WORLD'S CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES, 1908. 

Scene at Detroit. Conference between Managers Jennings and 

Chance, Umpires Sheridan and O'Day. The catcher 

is Schmidt of Detroit. Wright, Photo. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 67 

THE COMPOSITE SCORE. 

Following is a composite score of the five games played r 
thus arranged to show at a glance the total work in every de- 
partment : 

OFFICIAL COMPOSITE SUMMARY. 

Chicago. G. AB. R. BH. SH. SB. PO. A. E. 

Sheckard, left field 5 21 2501710 

Evers, second base 5 20 5 7 1 2 5 21 1 

Schulte, right field 5 18 4 7 2 2 3 

Chance, first base 5 19 4 8 5 66 3 

Steinfeldt, third base 5 16 34 314 11 1 

Hofman, center field 5 19 2 6 2 10 1 «> 

Tinker, shortstop 5 19 2 5 8 19 

Kling, catcher 5 16 2 4 1 32 6 

Reulbach, pitcher 2 3 5 

Overall, pitcher 3 6 2 1 3 

Brown, pitcher 2 4 1 6 

Pf eister, pitcher 1 2 

^Howard 1 1 C 

Totals 164 24 48 9 13 135 73 5 

Detroit. G. AB. R. BH. SH. SB. PO. A. E. 

Mclntyre, left field 5 18 2 4 110 01 

O'Leary, shortstop 5 19 2 4 1 7 12 1 

Crawford, center field 5 21 250 16 00 

Cobb, right field 5 19 3 7 1 2 3 2 

Rossman, first base 5 19 3401 48 52 

Shaefer, third base-second base... 5 16 2 1 10 11 1 

Schmidt, catcher 4 14 1 22 7 

§Thomas, catcher 2 4 1 9 2 

Downs, second base 261100281 

Coughlin, third base 380110361 

Killian, pitcher 1 1 

Summers, pitcher 2 5 1 7 

Donovan, pitcher 2 4 1 1 1 2 1 

Mnllin, pitcher 1 3 1 1 2 

Winter, pitcher 1 

t Jones 3 2 1 

Totals 158 15 32 5 5 *131 63 10 

Chicago 1 6 3 1 1 6 6—24 

Detroit 2 5 3 4 1—15 

* Overall out, hit by batted ball in fifth game. 

t Jones batted for Summers first game, for O'Leary in second game, 
and for Summers in fourth game. 
t Howard batted for Pfeister in third game. 
§ Thomas batted for O'Leary in first game. 

Left on bases— Chicago 30, Detroit 27. 

First on errors — Chicago 5, Detroit 3. 

Two-base hits — Chicago — Sheckard 2, Kling 1, Evers 1; total 4. 
Detroit — Downs 1, Cobb 1, Thomas 1, Mclntyre 1, Crawford 1; total 5. 

Three-base hits— Chicago— Schulte 1, Hofman 1. 

Home run — Chicago—Tinker 1. 

Hits— Off Reulbach 8 in 6 2-3 innings; Overall in 1-3 inning; 
Brown 2 in 2 innings in game October 10; Pfeister 10 in 8 innings; 
Reulbach 1 in 1 inning, game of October 12; Killian 5 in 2 1-3 innings; 
Summers 9 in 6 2-3 innings in game October 10; Summers 9 in 8 
innings; Winter 1 in 1 inning, game of October 13. 

Double plays— Tinker, Chance; Evers, Chance; Hofman, Kling; 
Brown, Tinker, Chance; total for Chicago 4. Downs, O'Leary, Ross- 




Detroit fans 



obb when he scored in second game at 
Chicago. 




Three Detroit Ball Players' Wives. 
WORLD'S CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES— SCENES AT CHICAGO. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 69 

man; Schaefer, O'Leary, Rossman; Schaefer, Rossman; Schmidt, 
Schaefer; O'Leary, Rossman, Coughlin; total for Detroit 5. 

Struck out by Chicago pitchers— By Reulbach, O'Leary l. Summers 1, 
Crawford i. Rossman i, Schaefer l. total 5; by Brown, Jones i, Cobb l. 
Rossman 1, Schaefer 1. Summers 1, total 5; by Overall, Mclntyre 2, 
O'Leary 2. Downs 2, Rossman 2, Schaefer 2, Schmidt 2, Crawford 1, 
Cobb l. Donovan 1, total 15; by Pfelster, Coughlin l, total l. Grand 
total 26. 

Struck out by Detroit pitchers— By Donovan. Schulte 1. Hofman 3, 
Eling 2. Steinfeldt 3, Chance 1, total 10; by Killian. Evers 1, total 1; 
by Summers, Reulbach 1, Overall 1, Sheckard. 1. Evers 1, Tinker 1, 
Brown 2, total 7; by Mullin, Sheckard 2, Steinfeldt 2, Pfeister 2, 
Hofman 1. Tinker 1. total 8. Grand total 26. 

Bases on balls— Off Overall 7. Brown 1, Pfeister 3; Reulbach 1. total 
12. Off Killian 3, Summers 4, Donovan 4, Mullin 1, Winter 1, total 13. 
Grand total 25. 

Passed ball— Kling 1, Schmidt 1. 

Muffed fly ball— Cobb 1. 

Wild throws— Evers 1. Mclntyre 1. Chance 1, Rossman 2, Coughlin 1. 

Muffed thrown balls — Chance 1, Donovan 1. 

Fumbles— Downs 1, Schaefer 1, Cobb 1, O'Leary 1. Chance 1, Stein- 
feldt 1. 

Wild pitches— Brown 1, Donovan 1, Overall 1. 

Hit by pitcher— By Overall. Mclntyre 1: by Brown. Coughlin 1. 

Officials — Umpires — O'Day. National League, and Sheridan. American 
League, 3 games; Klem. National League, and Connolly, American 
League, 2 games. Scorers — Richter and Flanner, all games. 

Average time of game— 1:46. Average attendance — 12,446. Weather- 
Clear and -warm. 

INDIVIDUAL CHICAGO BATTING. 
ASS ASS 

Player. G. B. R. H. H. B. PC. Player. G. B. R. H. H. B. PC. 



Chance, 


5 


19 


4 


8 





3 


.421 


Kling, 


5 


16 


2 


4 


1 





.250 


Schulte, 


5 


18 


4 


7 


2 


2 


.389 


Sheckard, 


5 


21 


2 


5 





1 


.238 


Evers, 


5 


20 


5 


7 


1 


2 


.350 


Reulbach, 


2 


3 














.000 


Overall. 


3 


6 





2 


1 





.333 


Brcwn. 


2 


4 








1 





.000 


Hofman, 


5 


19 


2 


6 





2 


.316 


Pfiester , 


1 


2 














.000 


Tinker, 


5 


19 


2 


5 








.263 


Howard, 


1 


1 














.000 


•Steinfeldt. 


5 


16 


3 


4 


3 


1 


.250 



















INDIVIDUAL DETROIT BATTING. 
ASS A S S 

Player. G. B. R. H. H. B. PC. Player. G. B. R. H. H. B. PC. 



Cobb. 


5 


19 


3 


7 


1 


2 


.368 


Downs, 


2 


6 


1 


1 








.167 


Mullin, 


1 


3 


1 


1 








.333 


Schaefer, 


5 


16 





2 


1 





.125 


Thomas. 


2 


4 





1 








.250 


Coughlin, 


3 


8 





1 


1 





.125 


Crawford. 


5 


21 


2 


5 








.238 


Schmidt, 


4 


14 





1 








.071 


Mclntyre, 


5 


18 


2 


4 





1 


.222 


Killian, 


1 

















.000 


O'Leary. 


5 


19 


2 


4 


1 





.211 


Donovan, 


2 


4 








1 


1 


.000 


Rossman, 


5 


19 


3 


4 


o 


1 


.211 


Winter, 


1 

















.000 


Summers, 


2 


5 





1 








.200 


Jones, 


3 


2 


1 











.000 



TEAM BATTING AVERAGE. 
Chicago Nationals, .293; Detroit Americans, .203. 

INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 

CATCHERS. 

Player. G. PO. A. PB. E. PC. 

Kling 5 32 6 1 1.000 

Schmidt 4 22 7 1 1.000 

Thomas 1 9 2 1.000 




1 — View of the bleachers, first game; rain fell all through the game. 
2— "Rooting" for the Tigers. 3 — Excitement on the bleachers when 
Detroit passed Chicago in the eighth inning of first game. 

F. G. Wright, Photos. 

WORLD'S CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES— SCENES AT DETROIT. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



71 



PITCHERS. 

Player. G. PO. A. E. PC. Player. G. PO. A. E. PC. 

Overall, 3 3 1.000 Killian, 10 10 1.000 

Reulbach, 2 5 1.000 Donovan, 2 12 1 .750 

Brown. 2 6 1.000 Pflester , 10 .000 

Summers, 2 7 1.000 Winter, 10 .000 

Mullin, 1 2 1.000 

FIRST BASEMEN. 

Player. G. PO. A. E. PC. 

Rossman 5 48 5 2 .964 

-Chance 5 66 3 .957 

SECOND BASEMEN. 

Schaefer 3 9 8 1.000 

Kvers 5 5 21 1 .963 

Downs 2 2 8 1 .909 

THIRD BASEMEN. 

Steinfeldt 5 4 11 1 .938 

Coughlin 3 3 6 1 .900 

Schaefer 2 1 3 1 .800 

SHORTSTOPS. 

Tinker 5 8 19 1.0C0 

O'Leary 5 7 12 1 .950 

OUTFIELDERS. 

Player. G. PO. A. E. PC. Player. G. PO. A. E. PC. 

Sheckard, 5 7 10 1.000 Crawford, 5 16 1.000 

.Schulte, 5-3 1.000 Mclntyre, 5 10 1 .909 

Hofman, 5 10 1 1.000 Cobb, 5 3 2 .600 

TEAM FIELDING AVERAGE. 

Chicago Nationals, .977; Detroit Americans, .951. 
THE PITCHING AVERAGES. 

Pitcher. W. L. Tie. PC. H. BB. HPB.SO. WP. 

Overall 2 1.000 7 7 1 15 1 

Brown .- 1 1.C00 6 115 1 

Beulbach 1 1.000 9 1 50 

Mullin 1 1.000 7 1 8 

Summers 2 .000 18 4 7 

Donovan 2 .000 17 4 10 1 

Pflester 1 .000 10 3 1 

Killian .000 5 3 10 

Winter .000 110 

ATTENDANCE AND RECEIPTS. 

Attend- Total Players' Clubs' National 

ance. Receipts. Share. Share. Commiss'n. 

First game, at Detroit... 10,812 $16,473.00 $8,895.42 $5,930.28 $1,647.30 

Second game, at Chicago. 17, 760 26,927.00 14,540.58 .. 9,693.72 2,692.70 

Third game, at Chicago. 14. 543 22,767.00 12,294.18 8,196.12 2,276.70 

Fourth game, at Detroit. 12. 907 19,231.00 10,384.74 6,923.16 1,923.10 

Fifth game, at Detroit.. 6,210 9,577.50 8,619.75 957.75 

Total 62,232 $94,975.00 $46,114.92 $39,363.03 $9,497.55 

Of the receipts $9,497 went to the National Commission for expenses. 
In the first four games only the players shared on the basis of 60 
per cent, to the winning and 40 per cent, to the losing team. The 
receipts of the fifth game went to the clubs, the players not par- 
ticipating. 




1, Parent; 2, Halm; 3, Shaw; 4, Donahue; 5, Anderson; 6, Tannehill; 
7, White; 8, Sullivan; 9, Atz. VanOeyen, Photo. 

A GROUP OF CHICAGO AMERICAN LEAGUE PLAYERS, 1908. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



73 




Short Biographies of the Champions 

Photos by Blondin, Chicago; copyright, 1907, by E. T. Johnson & Co., Chicago. 

FRANK L. CHANCE 

The manager of the Cubs was born thirty- 
one years ago in California, Fresno being the 
, exact spot of his nativity. Chance, or 
r'Husk," as he is popularly known to the 
(fans, was in the class of 1894 at the Uni- 
versity of Washington, Irvington, Cal., but 
left college to join the Chicago National 
League team eleven years ago. Chance never 
played with any other professional club. He 
was used as a catcher when he first joined 
Chicago, but manager Selee made a first baseman of him. Chance 
succeeded Selee as manager of the Cubs during the season of 
1905, and has piloted his team to three National League pen- 
nants and two World Championships. He throw! and bats right 
handed. 

JOHN G. KLING 

Chicago's great catcher is thirty-three years 
old, and has been in professional Base Ball 
fourteen years, having been secured by the 
Cubs from the St. Joseph, Mo., team, with 
which Kling began his professional career. 
Kling has been regarded as the king of back- 
stops for several seasons. His ease behind 
the bat is most marked. He throws and 
bats right-handed. 

PATRICK MORAN 

The Cubs' second catcher didn't get a 
chance in the World's Series, but he did 
. some fine work for the champions during the 
^ season when Kling was laid up with a 
broken thumb. Moran is thirty-one years 
old, has been playing twelve years and broke 
into the business at Lyons, N. Y. He throws 
and bats right-handed. Moran came to the 
Cubs from the Boston Nationals three years 
ago. 





MORDECAI BROWN 

"Brownie" came into his own only three 
years ago. Although thirty years old and 
of eight years' experience in professional; 
Base Ball, he didn't loom up as the star/j 
that he is until the season of 1906, when his j 
fine pitching was of chief aid in winning theV 
, Cubs their first championship. Brown began v 
playing professional ball at Terre Haute. He 
bats on either side of the plate but, as every 
one knows, pitches with the right hand, which 
was maimed in his early youth by a piece of machinery. The 
forefinger is off at the first joint. 








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1, Doolin; 2, Coveleski; 3, Magee; 4, McQuillen; 5, Grant; 6, Os- 
borne. Richter, Photo. 
A GROUP OF PHILADELPHIA NATIONALS, 1908. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



75 




ORVAL OVERALL 

The big California pitcher is only twenty- 
eight years old and has played professional 
ball only five years, having been a member 
of the class of 1903 at the University of 
California. He broke into the game at 
Tacoma, joined the Reds in 1905 and was 
secured by Chicago the following season. He 
throws right-handed and bats from either 
side of the plate. 



JOHN PFIESTER 

The Cubs' leading southpaw joined the team 
three years ago, having been secured from 
the Omaha Western League club. He is thirty 
one years old and began his Base Ball career] 
eight years ago with Baltimore. Jack was 
unlucky last year, but managed to get in 
some good blows on the Giants, which 
helped his team. He bats right-handed. 





EDWARD M. REULBACH 

Notre Dame and the University of Ver- 
mont both lay claim to Reulbach. He played 
his last college Base Ball at Vermont in 
1904 and joined the Cubs after the close of 
the school year. Reulbach was the property 
of the Sedalia, Mo., club, from which James 
A. Hart bought his release. Reulbach is 
twenty-seven years old and has had five 
years' experience in the professional game. 



CARL LUNDGREN 

The cool "Lundy" found the past season 
his most unfortunate since his entrance into 
professional Base Ball six years ago. He 
didn't seem to get in shape all season 
Lundgren is twenty-nine years old and gradu- 
ated with the class of 1902 at the University 
of Illinois. He pitches and bats right- 
handed. 





CHARLES C. FRASER 

"Chick" is the veteran of the Cubs' pitching 
staff, having been in professional ball since 
lie was twenty years old. He is now thirty- 
ive. Fraser began his Base Ball career at 
Minneapolis. He pitches and bats right- 
handed. Fraser has seen service with the 
Phillies, Bostons and Cincinnati Reds. 




1, Lindaman; 2, Dorner; 3, Kelley; 4, Sweeney; 5, Bates; 6, Dahlen; 
7, Flaherty. Pictorial News Co., Photo. 

A GROUP OF BOSTON NATIONALS, 1908. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



77 



ANDREW J. COAKLEY 

The Holy Cross pitcher is the newest mem- 
ber of the '.Cubs' staff and wasn't eligible for 
the World's Series, but did some good work 
for his team near the close of the league 
season. Coakley was a member of the class 
of 1903 at Holy Cross, and since leaving 
has played with the Philadelphia Athletics 
and Cincinnati. He is a right-hander. 





JOHN J. EVERS 

One of the youngest and still the most 
brilliant of the Cubs is not quite twenty-six 
years old. but he has seen seven years of 
league service. He joined the Cubs in 1903, 
being practically given to the Chicago club- 
by the Troy. N. Y., team in a trade. Evers 
was the "boot" in the deal. He throws right- 
handed and bats left-handed. 



JOSEPH B. TINKER 

The Cubs' shortstop was in the hero role 
most of the time during the past season, his 
tremendous batting. especially against 
Mathewson, being responsible for many vic- 
tories. Tinker is twenty-eight years old, has\J| 
been in professional ball nine years and be 
gan playing at Denver. He throws and bat; 
right-handed. 





HARRY STEINFELDT 

The third baseman of the Cubs slowed up 
a trifle last year on account of injuries but, 
at that, he played great ball. "Steiny" has 
been in the game twelve years, having begun 
at Fort Worth in the Texas League. He is 
thirty-two years old. He throws and bats 
right-handed. 



FRANK SCHULTE 

Here is the natural hitter of the cham- 
pions. Schulte's pose at the bat is the acme 
of grace and his eye is good. Schulte is in 
reality a youngster, being only twenty-six 
years old, but having had seven years of 
league experience. He began playing at 
Syracuse. He throws with his right hand 
but bats left-handed. 





1, Waddell; 2, Ferris; 3, C. Jones; 4, Graham; 5, T. Jones; 6, Stone; 
i, Howell; 8, Dineen; 9, Heidrick; 10, Stevens. VanOeyen, Photo. 

A GROUP OF ST. LOUIS BROWNS, 1908. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



79 




ARTHUR HOFMAN 

The fans in Chicago call the center fielder 
"Circus Solly," on account of the vast num- 
ber of sensational plays he has made during' 
his career with the Cubs as utility player. 
It was only last season that he was placed 
permanently in center field. Hofman is only 
twenty-four years old and began playing at 
Des Moines six years ago. He bats and 
throws right-handed. 



JAMES T. SHECKARD 

The left fielder is a veteran, having broken 
into professional Base Ball twelve years ago 
at Chambersburg, Pa. His minor league 
career was very short, the Baltimore club 
securing him after his first season out. 
Sheckard came to the Cubs from Brooklyn 
three years ago and bats left-handed but 
throws with his right. 





JAMES F. SLAGLE 

Like Fraser, Slagle has been a professional 
ball player for fifteen years, having broken 
into the game when he was eighteen years old 
at Franklin, Pa. He has done great service 
for the Cubs, finishing the season as utility 
outfielder. He throws right-handed but bats 
the other way. 



GEORGE E. HOWARD 

As a utility outfielder, Howard rendered 
splendid service to the Cubs the last two 
seasons. He has been in professional ball 
only eight years, having broken in at Mattoon, 
111. He is twenty-six years old. Bats left- 
handed, but throws with the right hand. He 
has played with Pittsburg and Boston. 





HENRY ZIMMERMAN 

This utility player filled in to excellent 
advantage for the Cubs all season. He played 
second and third well and his hitting during 
mid-season when the Cubs were so badly in- 
jured kept the team in the race. "Zim" is 
twenty-five years old and came to the Cubs 
from Wilkesbarre, Pa., in 1907. He throws 
and bats right-handed. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 81 

National League Campaign of 1908 

By John B. Foster 

In National League history there have been spasmodic inter- 
vals when the contest for the championship of the organization 
raged at fever heat. Temporarily interest in the playing of 
almost all of the teams was raised to the highest degree. 

In 1908 there was a prolonged session of exciting strife, 
exceeding anything in the history of the organization, and with 
its three-part struggle for supremacy closer methods, keener 
combated and more minutely interwoven than in any champion- 
ship fight since organized Base Ball has been established. 

Chicago, New York and Pittsburg waxed, and waned, and 
waxed, and waned again. History was made one day to be upset 
the next. The enthusiast of Chicago had barely time to hear the 
echo of his cheers dying on the prairies than his ears were 
flooded with the shouts of delight from New York, and New 
Y^ork grew riotous with joy, only to be stopped breathless in 
the midst of its celebration by the clamorous yells of the 
Pittsburg "fans" ringing noisily in its ears. 

If other Base Ball championship struggles in the National 
League had glowed, this of 1908 scintillated. It threw off a 
train of sparks of enthusiasm which spread to all cities of the 
land, and, as by a remarkable condition of circumstances, the 
race in the American League was little less thrilling than that 
•of the National League in exciting results and conditions, the 
Base Ball world was stirred to its depths by a succession of 
incidents which paraded before the joyful "fans," affording all 
the pleasure of a Mardi Gras Base Ball carnival 

□ □ □ 

Chicago's final achievement of the cham- 
Splendid Finale pionship, the third in succession for that 
team, was splendidly won after the most 
for Chicago extraordinary finish in the history of pro- 
fessional Base Ball, and by the margin of 
one game over New York. This very particular one game was 
a post-season contest ordered by the Board of Directors of the 
National League after they had decided that a prior game of 
September 23. in which it was alleged that Merkle, the New 
York first baseman, had not touched second base, while playing 
against Chicago and running the bases, and had been forced 
out by his failure to do so, was a tie game. The Board of 
Directors in their decision upheld both the umpires of the 
game, Messrs. O'Day and Emslie. and President Pulliam of the 
National League, who had ruled in consonance with the decision 
of his umpires. Later in this review the subject will be 
touched upon more fully. 

The pennant which 'had been captured in 1906, and that 
which had been won the following year, were gained with ease 
as compared with the energy which the Chicagos were com- 
pelled to inject into their work in 1908 to achieve the same result. 

Not only was it true that this team of sterling ball players 
was meeting with adversaries stronger and more capable than 
those of the two years which had preceded, but they were 
handicapped by injuries to important players of their own 
club. Time and time again, when it seemed as if Chicago was 
about to establish itself at the speed with which the team had 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 83 

been driven in 1006-07, some player would be hurt for the 
moment and substitutes would have to be thrown into the 
line. It is true they were competent substitutes, but substi- 
tutes, no matter how competent, do not always fit as smoothly 
into the team work of a club, which has been drilled through 
successive seasons for a certain purpose. It was not until 
well along toward the close of the season that the Chicagos 
began to play at their true form. At least good fortune fav- 
ored the team in that respect, for it was at the very twilight 
of the season that the club was compelled to perform its best work, 
owing to the dash, persistence and courage of its adversaries. 

If ever there was a moment when the team had a tendency 
to falter — and if there was such a tendency it was not visible 
to the critic who stood outside the portal of the clubhouse — 
the patient urging of Frank Chance, the captain, his undoubted 
faith in the ability of his players, his encouragement, at times 
possibly a little emphatic, for there are times in the life of a 
Base Ball club when all cannot be honey and toast, and the 
life and good cheer which were thrown into the work of the 
team by John Evers, the second baseman, one of the grand 
ball players of the present era, restored the poise and mental 
equilibrium of the players. The moment that the sun began to 
shine again upon their efforts they were the same spirited, 
scheming team — not in the sense of scheming illegitimately, 
but laying their plans to make the most of their chances 
against those of their adversaries — that had twice taken a 
National League pennant into the inland metropolis. 

□ □ □ 

Chicago had been the center of anticipa- 
New York's Part tion. New York was the center of expec- 
- *u r+ *i> tation on the part of some, of denunciation 

1I\ the Great Race on the part of others. No team over began 
a National League race of which a more 
varied career was predicted than New York. There were those 
who, in the calmness of the spirit of prophecy which overcame 
them, stated with stolid conviction that the best New York 
could hope to do was to finish sixth in the race, and some 
would have New York even lower. Others, less pessimistic as 
to the prospects of the New York team, granted the club a 
lease of life in the first division. Few there were who would 
concede that New York would be the positive contender of the 
year against the Chicagos, and the team most dreaded, in spite 
of the experimental nature of its composition. 

The race made by the Chicagos was that of the skilled and 
polished veterans. When the champions were able to place 
their full strength in the field the machine worked with the 
smoothness of new cider flowing gently from the press. 

The struggle of the New Yorks was that of the strong and 
lusty schoolboys, who not always quickest to adapt themselves 
to circumstances by reason of their lack of experience, make up 
In the strength of youth for some qualities which they might 
gain by the discretion of age. 

With New York the question of winning games was not one 
of diplomatic theory but of dynamic energy. Team work was 
there, but when the team work failed, as now and then it did 
in the rashness of youth to accomplish everything in a moment, 
bats still remained. Many a contest was fought to a success- 
ful New York conclusion because the players of the New York 
team could hit the ball hard and at timely moments. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 85 

If the game came fairly up to the ninth inning, with a run 
against the New York team, it had little effect upon the buoy- 
ancy of the players. With redoubled energy they jumped for- 
ward to meet the task which confronted them and made that 
one run. for the moment the greatest ambition of their lives, 
and if they made the one run they were keen to make the 
other that was needed to win. 

The services of one grand pitcher. Mathewson, helped the 
New York team immeasurably. Yet without that cavalier-like 
energy which the players infused in the field work that con- 
fronted them, it is quite improbable that even such assistance 
as that which comes from a mighty pitcher would have brought 
them to the high standard which tney achieved. 

Through all the work of the New York team was in evidence 
the guiding hand of John James McGraw. At no time in the 
career of this successful young manager has he shown to better 
advantage than he did in 190$. There have been seasons when 
he won championships with his team, but his skill in those 
years had no opportunity in which it could displav itself as it 
did in this wonderful period of Base Ball combativeness. 

ODD 

If the race which was made by the Chi- 

c ittsbur^ the cagos and the New Yorks was interesting. 
_ little less was that of Pittsburg. Constantly 

Third Contestant on the heels of the leaders, sometimes in 
front of them, never but a little way be- 
hind them. : as the following of the seasons, always 
a menace to the peace of mind of the Chicago players and the 
York players, the Pittsburgs were a factor in the struggle 
from the beginning of the year. 

That the team was handicapped by the lack of a good first- 
baseman throughout the summer is perhaps the greatest reason 
why it was not more of a menace to New Y'ork and Chicago 
than it proved to be. That Fred Clarke, the manager of the 
club, was able to accomplish so much, in view of the fact that 
none knew better than he where the weakness existed, is the 
more conspicuous tribute to the force of Clarke's intelligence as 
a manager. 

Pittsburg labored without avail to secure the type of first 
baseman which would have rounded up the infield of the club. 
There were no first basemen of the highest order to be ob- 
tained. If the minor leagues possessed desirable men, they 
clung to them. Most of them were engaged in remarkably 
close campaigns in their leagues and could not afford to lose 
their players. 

Another weakness in Pittsburg's game early in the year was 
in the outfield, but this was quite effectually done away with 
when Thomas was secured from Philadelphia and Wilson began 
to show such strength as fully warranted Clarke in keeping 
him on the regular team from the beginning of the year. 

Whatever weak points may have developed on the Pittsburg 
team it must not be forgotten that the nine developed one 
tremendously strong point, as it had developed it at the same 
place in other seasons. The work of Wagner, which almost 
from the day of his advent into major league company has 
been above the average, was little short of miraculous. 

While no one player is apt to win a championship for his 
team, it is not out of the way to say that Wagner did as.. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 87 

ranch as any one player in the L T nited States to prevent New 
York from beating either Pittsburg or Chicago for the cham- 
pionship. If the "Flying Dutchman" — and that is one of the 
happiest titles ever bestowed in good natured humor on a ball 
player — made mistakes against other nines, he did not make 
them against New York, and his fielding and batting were 
extraordinary when he played against that particular club. 

So apparent was this that it was freely commented on not 
only by those who were personally interested in the outcome 
of the pennant race, but by ball players of other nines and 
by Base Ball enthusiasts of many cities who chanr-ed to see 
the New Y'ork and Pittsburg clubs on the field now and then. 

Wagner must be considered as one of the "miracle'' players 
of a decade. While he has his faults, as all ball players have, 
they weigh but lightly in the balance against his virtues, and 
when he is at the top of his game he is one of the few men 
who are able to combine all three requisites of successful 
Base Ball — batting, fielding and base running. 

□ □ □ 

The other clubs of the National League 
All Clubs Better also P la y ed their parts. Some of them did 
. not play them so well as others. Even 

Collectively under those conditions the Base Ball of the 

year was superior, taken collectively, to 
that of any season for years in the premier organization of 
the U/nited States. Philadelphia, which wavered in the middle 
of the season, when a show of strength would certainly have 
made the team one of the contenders for the championship, 
recovered its poise immediately after the Fourth of July games 
in New York, and while the club was never quite able to re- 
gain all the ground which it had lost, it proved at the very 
close of the year a thorn in the flesh of the New York team, 
winning enough games to make it imperative for the New 
Yorks to play off their famous tie with Chicago for the pen- 
nant. 

□ □ □ 

THE CHAMPIONSHIP RACE 

The annual championship season of 1908 began on April 14. 
As had been largely anticipated in the West, and to some 
extent predicted in the East, Pittsburg and Chicago began to 
make the pace in the race. The season had been only four 
days old when Pittsburg assumed the lead, but on the following 
day the Chicagos took it from their Pittsburg rivals, and it is 
possible that about that time some of the croakers began to 
complain that the race would be like those which had preceded 
for two years — Chicago all the way. 

By April 21 the New Y'ork team had tied with the Chicagos 
and ran on even terms with them for two days, to be shaken 
off by the champions on April 23. 

From then until June SO Chicago was always in the lead. 
The margin of superiority was not at times so wide as it might 
have been, but the champions held their heads in front, and 
they were satisfied to do that well considering that they were 
worried constantly by injuries to players. 

New York was second in the race on April 23 and 24. On 
the two days which followed the Giants were tied with Pitts- 
burg for second place. On April 27, while the New Yorks 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 89 

were in Boston, they won and pushed Pittsburg- back of them, 
and for two days more they continued to hold second place 
against their western adversaries. 

Then it was that Pittsburg reversed the order of things, and 
New York was compelled to drop back in the race, not very 
far at first, it is true, but out of second place and away from 
a close position as runner-up to the leaders. In the meantime 
the Pittsburg team, on its own ground, began to play ball with 
something of the real Pittsburg finish, and the team remained 
in second place until May 16. 

Cincinnati's fine showing gave great encouragement to the 
enthusiasts of that city. Ganzel seemed to have his team 
working more smoothly than it had in the past, and there was 
a marked effort to improve the quality of its run-getting. 

On May 31 Chicago and Pittsburg broke even on a double- 
header, and in those games the Chicago club had a little bad 
luck. Moran was spiked and Fraser was hurt. In this double- 
header Willis, for Pittsburg, lost his game, while McCarthy- 
won for Pittsburg. 

At this moment, when it was incumbent that all the teams 
should be in the "pink of condition," to use an old phrase 
about athletes, the New York club was unfortunate enough to 
be deprived of the services of Herzog, who had proved that 
he was a good utility man ; Bridwell, the shortstop ; Bresnahan, 
the catcher, and Ames, pitcher. All were in the hospital. 

On June 1 the Giants tumbled into fifth place. They lost 
a game to Boston in Boston, with Wiltse in the box. Phila- 
delphia was still playing at a fast clip and was second in the 
race, and seemingly in a condition to remain there, judging 
by the good team work of the players. 

On the following day Pittsburg beat Chicago and gained on 
the champions. The Pittsburgs went back to second place and 
Wagner, the omnipresent shortstop of the team, did his share 
to put them there by batting in six runs. 

Brooklyn was too much for Philadelphia on June 3 and the 
Cincinnatis moved up to third place by reason of the defeat 
of the Quakers. Lumley, who had been playing very little for 
the Brooklyn team, got into the game just in time to knock 
the ball over the fence and make the victory certain. 

On June 4 the western teams began to play games in the 
east. Chicago was Boston's adversary and for seventeen 
innings the west and the east fought stubbornly, both teams 
finally being compelled to surrender to darkness with the 
score a tie. It was then that the Boston club looked good 
enough to be a tip-top fighter all the season, and probably 
would have been one if Bowerman had not been injured, which 
disrupted for the time being all the team work of the club. 

Cincinnati beat Brooklyn on June 5 and went into second 
place, showing how closely the teams which were making the 
fight at that time were following each other. Cincinnati's 
elevation in the race dropped the Pittsburgs to third place and 
Philadelphia to fourth. 

New York gained a point in the race on June 8 by beating 
St. Louis, with McGinnity in the box against Raymond. The 
Giants moved up to fourth. Pittsburg's victory over Phila- 
delphia helped New York to gain. 

On June 9 began one of the much anticipated struggles of 
the season when the Pittsburgs came to New l'ork for their 
first series with the Giants. It did not turn out very well for 
the New York team. The first game started in New York's 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 91 

favor, when Crandall outpitched Camnitz, and the Giants won 
by an easy margin, but on June 11 New York dropped back 
to fifth ' place by fielding miserably against the Pittsburgs, 
when Mathewson had outpitched Willis. Philadelphia was 
fourth because of the loss of the game by the New York team. 

Chicago, in the meanwhile, was having a hard time to beat 
Brooklyn, and yet succeeded by narrow margins in claiming 
the games from the rapidly tumbling Superbas. Rucker did 
manage to hold one contest in this series by outpitching 
Fraser, but the score was small, and Brooklyn's preponderance 
of success could be weighed on an apothecary's scale. Chicago 
almost immediately reversed matters by beating Brooklyn 2 
to 1 on June 11 in eleven innings. 

New York went back to fourth place on June 13. A great 
deal of the fight was being made by New York, which con- 
tested gamely with Cincinnati, Philadelphia and Pittsburg for 
a better place, as the Chicagos could not be shaken from their 
position at the top until the very end of the month. This 
victory of June 13, which raised the Giants in the race, was 
won from Cincinnati in ten innings by the score of 3 to 2. 
Crandall and Ewing were the pitchers. On this same date the 
Chicagos had one of their narrowest squeezes of the year win- 
ning from Philadelphia by the scant margin of 1 to 0, and 
that due to an error made by Grant in the seventh inning of 
the game. 

On June 15 the New York club played what was considered 
by them to be one of the hard luck games of the year. John- 
stone, the umpire, started the game in the rain against Cin- 
cinnati, and after it had gone three and one-half innings called 
tifne, in spite of the fact that the rain was not falling harder 
then than it had in an inning before. 

The New York players had scored seven runs, and unques- 
tionably would have won if the umpire had insisted that the 
game go its legal length. Had this contest been finished and 
New Y^ork been the victor, there would have been no necessity 
to play the Chicagos a tie game to decide the championship 
in the race. The New Yorks batted very hard in this contest. 

On June 18 the Chicagos began a series on the Polo Grounds, 
in New York, starting out with an enormous crowd on the 
first day, and playing to record crowds during their stay in 
that city. The first game was won rather easily by the cham- 
pions by the score of 7 to 2, Wiltse, Taylor and Malarkey 
pitching against Reulbach and Lundgren. The latter was far 
more effective than Reulbach. 

In the next three games which were played by the Chicagos 
in New York the Giants were victors in all. The scores were 
6 to 3. 4 to 0, and 7 to 1. Good batting, better fielding, and 
successful base running were the factors which helped New Y r ork. 

With the beginning of the month of July the Pittsburgs 
were in first place in the race. At the outset it may be stated 
that the work of this month was almost wholly a fight be- 
tween the Pittsburgs, New Y T orks and Chicagos to hold their 
own at the top. 

Philadelphia was in the throes of its v/orst flunk of the 
year. The Quakers lost a double-header to the Bostons on 
July 1 and dropped back to fifth place. 

On July 2 Chicago and Pittsburg broke even at Pittsburg, 
and on July 3 Pittsburg shut out Chicago. The New York 
players were watching the work of the western teams with 
anxious interest, doing their utmost to profit by any mistakes 
which might be made by the players in that section. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 93 

July 4 finished the calamities of the Philadelphias. They 
were beaten twice by the New Ybrks, having lost all four 
games of the series. In the morning game against Philadel- 
phia Wiltse pitched his famous ten-inning no-hit contest. The 
sorry showing against New York was the last of the poor 
work of the Philadelphia players for a long time, as after 
they had departed from the east and had begun a second 
tour of the west, they braced up finelj. 

Chicago beat Pittsburg in a double-header on Fourth of 
July and took the lead again in the race. St. Louis also won 
a double-header from the Cincinnatis, practically putting the 
finishing touches on the Reds for the season. On the Tourth 
of July New York signed McCormick, who had been with the 
Philadelphias, and began to play him regularly in the outfield. 
It was his good batting which went far toward helping the 
Giants to the top in the remainder of the season's work. 

Pittsburg beat the Chicagos on July 5 and went back again 
to the lead. Moran made a bad muff, which gave the Pitts- 
burgs three runs in this game and assured them of victory. 

By July 9 the Chicagos had forged to the front once more. 
The pace was a little too fast for Pittsburg, especially as the 
Philadelphias, determined to have satisfaction after the rude 
manner in which they had been beaten by New York, beat 
Pittsburg three out of four games. 

On July 10 the New Y/ork team had again arrived at Pitts- 
burg and the race was on between those teams. Leach won 
the first game for Pittsburg by making a home run in the 
ninth inning, and New York lost the next game. In the mean- 
time Sunday intervened and Pittsburg went to Chicago, where 
the teams broke even in a double-header. 

On July 13 the Giants won twice in one afternoon from the 
Pittsburgs, although the Pirates managed to make three home 
runs in the second game. 

The New Yorks beat Chicago on July 15, going into second 
place. Pittsburg took the lead and Chicago dropped back to 
third place. The Giants duplicated their victory over Chicago 
in the second game and lost the .third and fourth because of 
the timely batting of Tinker. The Chicago shortstop won the 
third game by the score of 1 to with a home run, and a 
two-bagger sent in enough runs to clinch the second game for 
Chicago. This, by the way, was the beginning of the splendid 
batting streak by Tinker which went so far toward helping 
the "Cubs" to win the championship. , 

Pittsburg was the first team to face the New Yorks, when 
the Giants had returned to their own ground, and there was 
a tremendous crowd to greet the players. The game was won 
by New York, and Doyle of New Y^ork made a single, double 
and triple against Willis. 

On July 25 Pittsburg reversed conditions and won from the 
Giants. One of the features of that contest, and one which 
will not soon be forgotten by those who witnessed it, was the 
remarkable batting of Wagner. He made five hits in succession 
against Mathewson and McGinnity. That game put New York 
back in third place and Chicago second. 

On July 28 New York and Pittsburg engaged in another 
great contest when they played sixteen innings, with the score 
resulting 2 to 2, and Willis and Wiltse pitching. 

August must have been the month of Mars for the New 
York club. The players threw themselves into the fight with 
all the ardor which they possessed : Nor were the Chicago 
and the Pittsburg teams less courageous than the Giants. The 




1, Gilbert; 2, O'Rourke; 3, Hostetter; 4, Higginbotham ; 5. Marshall; 
6, Murray; 7, McGlynn; 8, Fromme; 9, Shaw: 10. McCloskey; 11, 
House; 12, Karger; 13, Konetchy; 14, Lndwig: 15. Byrnes: 16, Barry; 
17, Delehanty; 18, Sallee; 19, Raymond; 20, Charles; 21, Beebe. 

Copyright, 1908, by Star Photo Co. 
ST. LOUIS TEAM— NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 95 

[hrce-cornered struggle between the leading teams drew so closely 
to a neck-and-neck race that all the United States became 
overwrought as to the outcome of the games, and persistently 
behind the leaders, but always with a hopeful chance, were 
the Philadelphia players, who declined to be considered out of 
the contest until it was no longer possible for them to win. 

On August 4 New York made another stride forward in the 
race. By defeating the Cincinnatis in a double-header they 
went into second place and Chicago had to drop back to 
third. McGinnity pitched most of the first game for the 
Giants, Mathewson being called into the box at the last mo- 
ment, and Mathewson pitched all of the second. Chicago 
lost on this date to the Philadelphia club, Reulbach proving 
ineffective, while Corridon had the Chicago players fooled. 

It was now time for the Chicagos to appear in New York. 
Naturally excitement was at its height in that city and a 
monster crowd greeted the Chicagos on August 8 when they 
made their appearance on the Polo Ground. Wiltse and 
Brown were the opposing pitchers, and while it was a strange 
fact that Brown was usually lucky against Mathewson, he 
was seldom lucky against Wiltse, and lost the game by the 
score of 4 to 1. Overall pitched the latter part of the con- 
test for Chicago. 

The fight now being made by the Giants was to overtake 
Pittsburg, which was in the lead. So on August 10, before 
another fine crowd, the New York players beat Chicago by 
the score of 3 to 2. Mathewson and Overall were the oppos- 
ing pitchers. On the same afternoon the Phillies beat Pitts- 
burg handsomely and the Pirates dropped back so far that 
the New York players were within four points of them. 

On August 11 the New Yorks and 'the Chicagos were to 
have played a double-header on the Polo Ground. There was 
the greatest crowd of the year present to see the games. At 
the end of the seventh inning of the first game, with the 
mammonth stands filled to their capacity, a cloudburst flooded 
the ground and the first game was called with the score 4 
to against New York. It was impossible to play the second 
game. Thousands of spectators were drenched to the skin 
and the sight was one of the most ludicrous, in spite of its 
annoying features ever witnessed on a ball ground. 

The New York players finished their eastern campaign with 
a victory over Brooklyn on August 13 and that night started 
for the west, second in the race, with Chicago third, and 
Pittsburg in the lead. Western enthusiasts predicted that the 
Giants would drop back to fourth or fifth place, as they had 
on their previous trip to the west, but the prediction was ill 
judged, as was proved before the first of September. 

New York's start in St. Louis seemed likely to carry out 
the predictions of the croakers, for the players, after winning 
one game, lost a double-header on Sunday afternoon, August 
16. Philadelphia again proved its prowess against Chicago by 
shutting out the Cubs on their own field. 

On August 18, while New York was idle, Boston beat the 
Pittsburgs. bringing the leaders in the race a little closer to 
the standing of the Giants. On the following day in Cin- 
cinnati Donlin helped New York to a victory by making a hit 
in the tenth inning which scored the winning run. 

On August 20 the Giants finally saw their ambition realized. 
The New York team beat Cincinnati in a well fought game, 
and on the same afternoon Brooklyn beat Pittsburg. That 
made the standing of New York and Pittsburg identical, each 




1, Sweeney, Boston; 2, Mitchell, Cincinnati; 3, Hulswitt, Cincin- 
nati; 4, Spade, Cincinnati; 5, Hummel, Brooklyn; 6, Beaumont, Bos- 
ton; 7, Mowrey, Cincinnati; 8, Huggins, Cincinnati. Conlon, Photo. 

A GROUP OF NATIONAL LEAGUE PLAYERS, 1908. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 97 

team having won and lost exactly the same number of games. 
Coakley was pitted against Mathewson in the game which was 
won by the Giants, while Mclntyre, the Brooklyn pitcher, was 
superior to Camnitz for Pittsburg. Somewhat tardily the 
west began to acknowledge that New York was more of a 
pennant factor than had been anticipated. The team had 
carried the fight into the country of the enemy, and had 
scored a gain in percentage away from its own ground, show- 
ing that its resources were strong enough to make it respected. 

On August 24 began the series between New York and 
Pittsburg. It was the turning point of the race, and the 
beginning of Pittsburg's misfortunes after its great fight from 
the commencement of the season. The Giants not only beat 
Pittsburg in a double-header on August 24 but they won on 
August 25 and August 26 in the same city. It was the sen- 
sational series of the year and in the first afternoon's vic- 
tory, when New l'ork won twice, the Giants went to the lead 
in the race and hung there until September 29. 

Completely reversing the form which they had shown at 
Pittsburg, the New York players went to Chicago and lost 
three games in succession to the champions. The second was 
on August 29 and Mathewson and Brown, old rivals, were 
the opposing pitchers. New York was despoiled of this game 
more because of bad base running than because of errors or 
weak pitching. 

The third was lost on August 30 by the score of 2 to 1 
with Pfiester in the box for Chicago, and his pitching was 
too much for the New York players, who made but five hits, 
of which three were batted by Doyle. 

Through for the year with games in the western section of 
the league, the eastern clubs returned home for the final rally. 

Chicago went to Pittsburg to play on September 4, and the 
outcome of this game was given the greatest attention all 
over the United States. Brown and Willis were the pitchers 
and again the powerful bat of Wagner was wielded with 
telling effect for the Pittsburg club. After Clarke, the Pitts- 
burg captain and manager, had reached first base, it was a base 
hit by Wagner and another by Wilson which brought home the 
winning run for the Pirates in the tenth inning with the score 
of 1 to 0. In a way this was of adyantage to New York, as the 
Giants beat Philadelphia easily on the same afternoon. 

Chicago reversed matters on the day following, giving Pitts- 
burg one of the worst whippings which the team had re- 
ceived during the year. The score was 11 to in favor of 
the champions, and the Pittsburg players not only batted 
poorly but fielded miserably. 

A double-header which followed on September 6 at Chicago, 
on Sunday, resulted in an even break for the Pittsburg and 
Chicago clubs. That kept the western teams down while the 
New Yorks still held sway at the top of the league ladder, 
increasing their lead, instead of losing. 

On September 7 the New York players received their first 
setback in a long time, losing one game of a double-header to 
the Philadelphias. Pittsburg beat St. Louis twice and picked 
up finely in percentage, while the Chicagos could only break 
even with the Cincinnatis. and were no better off on the 
day's results than New York. This afternoon in particular 
was of distinct advantage to the Pittsburg nine. 

New York had to make a slashing fight against Brooklyn 
at the Polo Ground on September 8. It was the first day of 
the team's return home after its long trip and Rucker had 




1, Lumley, Brooklyn; 2, Ames, New York; 3, Jordan, Brooklyn; 4, 
Dahlen, Boston; 5, Dooin, Philadelphia; 6, Graham, Boston; 7, 
Wilhelm, Brooklyn; 8, Sheehan, Brooklyn; 9, Murdock, St. Louis. 

Photos by Conlon and Pictorial News Co. 

A GROUP OF NATIONAL LEAGUE PLAYERS, 1908. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 99 

been saved to make all the trouble possible against the New 
York team. The Giants scored nothing until the tenth in- 
ning when Bridwel] made a base hit following good work 
by McCormick and Seymour, which sent the winning run over 
the plate. On this afternoon New York received the 
telling hurt of the year. Doyle was spiked by Ilummell while 
sliding to second, and was out of the game for the season. 
He had been batting for four weeks at a .400 rate and field- 
ing superbly at second base. 

The New York players won steadily through the Brooklyn 
3, Herzog going to second for the Giants. Some of the 
games were hard fought and others were captured with more 
ease. Pittsburg, however, was finding the pace fast in the 
west. On September 10 Cincinnati beat the Pittsburg team 
and on September 13 repeated the dose. It was an unlucky 
thirteen for the Pirates, for they were forced to third place 
after their splendid campaign. Rowan pitched against Willis 
on September 13. and although he did not last long with 
Cincinnati, this one game was sufficient to make the Pitts- 
burg ball players feel sorry that Cincinnati had impressed 
him into the National League for a trial. 

Seymour pulled the New York game of September 14, 
against Brooklyn, out of the fire, by making five hits and 
sending home all four of the runs which were scored by the 
Giants. The Brooklyns were close on their heels with three. 

The Giants, after winning a straight series of games from 
Brooklyn, followed with another straight series from St. 
Louis, and was so comfortably ahead that some of the more 
sanguine supporters of the team seemed to think the race 
was as good as won. although it was pointed out that Chi- 
cago and Pittsburg had better than an ordinary chance if 
the New Y'ork players should slip badly in all the contests 
which were to follow. 

On the afternoon of September 18 the New Yfork and Pitts- 
burg players were engaged in a double-header on the Polo 
Ground. The Giants won both games and then the excited 
New York "fans" became certain that New York could not be 
beaten for the championship flag of 1908. 

A careful computation showed that if the New Yorks were 
able to hold their own against the other clubs which re- 
mained to be played and beat Chicago at least two games in 
the series against the champions, the indications were that 
they would win the championship. As after events proved, 
this would have been the case, but New York failed to win 
the two needed games against Chicago, as will subsequently 
be related. 

In the next two games against Pittsburg the New York 
players failed to do so well. They lost the third in the tenth 
inning because of a sequence of hits in the final inning, and 
the fourth by the close margin of 2 to 1. The last game 
was much protested against by the spectators, who were dissatis- 
fied with the umpiring as it related to the decisions on the 
bases and involved the Pittsburg players. 

On Sept?mber 22 the Chicagos were scheduled to play in 
New York and one of the lareest crowds that ever was assembled 
for a professional Base Ball contest gathered to see the sport. 

To the great concern of the New l'ork enthusiasts the 
Chicagos, fighting like demons, with Overall and Brown in 
the box. Overall pitching part of the first game, and Brown 
filling in the first and also pitching all of the second, cap- 
tured both contests from the Giants. 




1, Gleason, Philadelphia; 2, Raymond. St. Louis: 3, Mathewson, New 
York; 4, Wiltse, New York: 5, McGlynn, St. Louis. 

Photos by Richter, Conlon. and Pictorial News Co. 

A GROUP OF NATIONAL LEAGUE PLAYERS, 1908. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. ±^ 

Ames, who had at last recovered from his long illness, but 
who was still a little "rusty,'' owing to lack of practice, 
started to pitch the lirst game against Chicago, and did very- 
well until it was necessary to take him Out of the box to allow 
another player to bat. 

Crandall began the second game but did not finish it. In 
both of the contests McGinnity filled in after the regular 
pitcher had been sent to the bench. New York failed to bat 
w T ith any assurance against Brown and Tinker's admirable 
work at short cut down hit after hit, that appeared as if 
they would surely go safe. The Chicagos knew that unless they 
could overwhelm New York in the series there would be no 
chance for them to win the championship, and they never spared 
themselves for a moment from the time that the game began 
until they were completed. The double victory ploughed deeply 
into the lead of the Giants, but they still had the opportunity 
which had been theirs for the last three weeks — that of beating 
Chicago twice, which would almost surely settle the champion- 
ship in their favor. 

On the following afternoon, September 23, occurred the play 
which set all the Base Ball world by the ears. It was an in- 
stance without precedent on the diamond. The only attempted 
play, which in any way resembled it, was the effort of the 
Chicago club at Pittsburg to have a runner declared out be- 
cause he had not touched second base after a base hit had 
been made by the batter. This claim O'Day, the umpire, re- 
fused to recognize on the ground that he had not seen the al- 
leged act of dereliction on the part of the runner. In the last 
inning of the game of September 23 with McCormick on third 
base, and Merkle on first base, and two out, Bridwell, the New 
York shortstop, batted a clean base hit over second base to the 
outfield. McCormick scored and Bridwell touched first base. 
Evers, the second baseman, remained standing at second base, 
calling for the ball to be thrown to him, and Chance, the Chi- 
cago captain, asserting that it was thus thrown, demanded from 
O'Day that he declare Merkle out on the ground that he had 
not touched second base, and therefore had been forced out. 

O'Day, umpire in charge, left the field, without announcing 
any decision further than to say that play was suspended. After 
the crowd had left the ground he stated that the run, which was 
supposed to have been made by McCormick, and which would 
have won the game for the New York team, had not scored, 
and that the contest, therefore, ended a tie, 1 to 1. 

He declared by that decision that he considered Merkle to 
have been forced out at second base. 

The umpire made his report to President Pulliam of the Na- 
tional League, who sustained the report of the umpire, and im- 
mediately protests were filed by both the New York and Chi- 
cago clubs with the Board of Directors of the National League. 

The Chicago club appealed from the decision of the league 
president on the ground that his refusal to award the game in 
their favor was in violation of Sections 45 and 55 of the league 
constitution. These refer to the number of games which shall 
he played during the season, and the time when the games shall 
he played. The Chicago club insisted that the New York club 
should have played this particular tie game on September 24. 
As a matter of fact the president of the National League in- 
formed the New York club that it need not prepare to play 
the game in question on September 24, so the New York of- 
ficials had substantial reason for aeclining to do so. 

The appeal of the New York club was directly against the 




1, Foxen, Philadelphia; 2, Thomas, Pittsburg ;> 3, Kane, Pittsburg; 
4, Leever, Pittsburg; 5, Maddox, Pittsburg; 6, Young, Pittsburg. 

Conlon, Photo. 
A GROUP OF NATIONAL LEAGUE PLAYERS, 1908. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 103 

decision of the umpire, which, it was contended, was unjust 
and not in accordance with the facts. The president of the 
Now York club insisted that the game should be recorded in favor 
of his club, as the score was presumed to have been made — 
1! to 1 in favor of New York. 

President Pulliam called a meeting of the Board of Directors 
in Cincinnati. Messrs. Murphy, of Chicago, and Dreyfuss, of 
Pittsburg, who were directors, were debarred from consultation 
in the case, as it was asserted that both owners were interested 
parties. This left the matter to be decided by Messrs. Herr- 
mann, of Cincinnati, Ebbets, of Brooklyn, and Dovey, of Boston^ 

For nearly two days and one night the directors heard evi- 
dence. 

In view of the fact that the decision which was rendered by 
them is one of the most important which ever was given in the 
history of Base Ball, the editor of the Guide deems it proper 
to publish it in full in this space, directly in conjunction with 
the story of the National League race. The decision is as fol- 
lows : 

In our judgment this case is the most important one that has ever 
"been presented to the Board of Directors of the National League for 
adjudication. We have given the entire matter the most careful 
consideration. We have examined all of the testimony submitted in 
evidence very carefully, and have listened attentively to the argu- 
ments advanced by both parties. In arriving at our conclusions we 
are guided entirely by the law and the rules as they exist, and the 
evidence as it is submitted, and cannot be governed by anything 
else. The case, no doubt, is fully understood by every person who 
has taken an interest in it. We desire first to call attention to 
the play in question, which was as follows: 

"Bridwell, of New York, came to the bat in the 
last half of the ninth inning with a tie score — 
1 to 1 — with Merkle on first base and McCormick 
on third base, and two out. Bridwell made a safe 
line hit to center field." 

On this hit there can be no question but what the game should 
have been won by the New York club had it not been for the reck- 
less, careless, inexcusable blunder of one of its players, namely — ■ 
Merkle. In order that a run could have been scored to win the 
game the following rule applied at the time the hit was made by 
Bridwell : 

"Rule 59. One run shall be scored every time a 
base runner, after having legally touched the first 
three bases, shall legally touch the home base before 
three men are put out; provided, however, that if he 
reach home on or during a play in which the third 
man be forced out or be put out before reaching 
first base, a run shall not count. A force-out can be 
made only when a base runner legally loses the right 
to the base he occupies, and is thereby obliged to 
advance as the result of a fair hit ball not caught 
on the fly." 

This rule is plain, explicit and cannot be misconstrued by any- 
one. While it may not have been complied with in many other 
games; while other clubs may not have taken advantage of its pro- 
visions in the past under similar conditions, yet it did not deprive 
the Chicago club of the right to do so if they so desired, notwith- 
standing that it might be termed as taking advantage of winning or 
tieing a game' upon a technicality. 

Merkle should have had only one thing on his mind, namely, to 
reach second base in safety, by a hit, error, or in any other way. 




1, Byrne, St. Louis; 2, Devlin, New York; 3, Kane, Cincinnati; 4, 
Snodgrass, New York; 5, Ritchey, Boston; 6, Barry, New York; 7, 
Osteen, St. Louis; 8, Brain, New York. Conlon, Photo. 

A GROUP OF NATIONAL LEAGUE PLAYERS, 1908. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 105 

The evidence clearly shows the following: After Bridwel! hit the 
ball safely he ran to and over first base; McCormick started for 
home and crossed the plate; Merkle started for second, and when 
about half-way to the base, turned and ran in the direction of the 
clubhouse without having reached second base. Emslie was officiating 
as umpire back of the pitcher, O'Day back of the catcher. When 
the hit was made Emslie fell to the ground to escape being hit by 
the ball; he got up and watched the play at first base, and saw 
that the batter had run out his hit. In the meantime the ball was 
fielded by Hofinan and eventually fielded to second base to Evers for 
a put out on Merkle. Tinker notified Emslie that Merkle did not 
run to second base. Emslie stated that he did not see the play and 
then went to his colleague, O'Day, and asked him whether he had 
seen the play. O'Day answered in the affirmative, and then Emslie 
asked whether Merkle had run to second, and being informed that 
he had not, Emslie declared Merkle out, which, under the rule above 
quoted, he not only had a right to do, but was required to do. To 
many patrons of the game it may appear in picturing the play in 
their minds as rather peculiar that Umpire O'Day, under a condition 
of this kind, should have been watching the play at second. 

It is for this reason that we quote from O'Day's testimony as- 
follows: 

Mr. Murphy — I would like to ask you, Mr. O'Day, if the matter at 
Pittsburg had caused you to anticipate a play of this sort? 

Mr. O'Day — Yes sir; and I came within an ace to tell Bob, but I 
thought that I had no right by my actions to tell the players what 
to do or give them an inkling of what I thought. It was my duty 
to be at the plate and watch them. 

We therefore find that the ruling as made by the umpires was in 
accordance with the playing rules and in conformity with what hap- 
pened on the field at that time. To set aside an umpire's decision 
on a judgment of play by evidence from the persons in attendance 
at any game would, to our mind, be establishing a bad and dan- 
gerous precedent, and one that the Base Ball public would condemn 
in a very short time. In this case, however, there is not a single 
line or word of testimony offered by the New York club that could 
even by inference be construed to mean that Merkle reached 
second base at any time, excepting the affidavit of the player him- 
self; which, however, was not made until after Mr. Pulliam had 
passed on the case. We can, therefore, come to no other conclusion 
than that the New York club lost a well-earned victory as the result 
of a stupid play of one of its members. We sustain the President 
in upholding the report of the umpires with reference to this game. 

Before passing to the protest by the Chicago club it might also be 
well to call attention to the fact that the query was submitted as 
to why the umpires did not proceed with the game in accordance 
with the rules and the constitution after they had decided that 
Merkle was out, and the game at that time was a tie. In answer 
to this query both umpires contend that it was growing dark very 
rapidly, and that there was the utmost confusion and uproar on the 
grounds, that it would have been an impossibility to clear the 
grounds in time to proceed with the game even if they had attempted 
to do so. From the evidence submitted and from the statements 
made, we believe that the umpires acted wisely under the extraor- 
dinary circumstances and conditions existing on the field and in 
calling the game at the time that they did. 

Coming now to the appeal as made by the Chicago club. This, to 
our mind, should not be given any consideration at all. If there 
was a violation of Sections 45 and 55 of the constitution by the 
New York club in having failed to play off a tie game on the only 
available date the Chicago club and not the New York club is to be 
blamed. The evidence shows that on the night of the game in ques- 
tion the Chicago club filed a certain claim with Mr. Pulliam for a 
forfeiture of the game. This claim on their part tied the hands of 
the President and prevented the playing off of the tie game • on the 
following day. The evidence also shows that on the day following 




1, Courtney, Philadelphia; 2, Leach, Pittsburg; 3, Higginbotham, St. 
Louis; 4, O'Rourke, St. Louis; 5, Sallee, St. Louis; 6, Corridon, Phila- 
delphia; 7, Leifield, Pittsburg. 

Photos by Richter and Pictorial News Co. 

AT GROUP/OF. NATIONAL LEAGUE PLAYERS, 1908.' 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 107 

the game in question the New York club conferred with Mr. Pulliam 
and inquired of him whether they would be required to play off the 
tie game and were Informed by him that they would not be required 

to do so. By this action the New York dub clearly indicated, in 
our Judgment, that they were ready to play off this game if they 
were required to do so. To make an award of a game against the 
Now York club under these conditions would he absurd. We there- 
fore sustain the finding of the President with reference to the appeal 
tiled by the Chicago club. 

In reviewing this entire matter we realize the great importance 
that the game in question may be in determining as to what club 
is to be declared the winner of the championship of the National 
League. In considering the same the thought has occurred to us as 
to whether or not the New York club can be deprived of their rights 
to play off the tie game in question, especially so in view of the 
fact that the game was not played off by reason of any action of 
the club. 

Our judgment and finding is that they cannot be deprived of this 
right under the circumstances. As we have already stated the 
evidence shows that the game was not played off on account of the 
estoppel of the Chicago club under the constitutional operation of 
their fiist claim. The evidence, we repeat, also indicates, in our 
judgment, that the New York club would have played off this game 
on the only available day possible had they not been informed by 
Mr. Pulliam that they would not be required to do so. This action 
on Mr. Pulliam's part cannot be criticized by anyone, because his 
hands were tied by the attitude of the Chicago club. We, there- 
fore, hold that the' New York club should, in all justice and fairness 
under these conditions, be given an opportunity to play off the game 
in question. For that reason we order that the game be played off 
on the Polo Grounds on Thursday, October 8, or as soon thereafter as 
the weather conditions will permit, and both clubs are directed to 
govern themselves accordingly. We also require that the rules gov- 
erning the world's series in so far as they apply to the playing field 
shall govern in this contest. 

AUGUST HERRMANN. 

GEORGE B. DOYEY. 

CHARLES H. EBBETS, 

Directors of the National League. 

This decision, it must be borne in mind, was not delivered 
immediately after the game in New York, but some days later, 
when the case had properly made its way through the channels 
of regular procedure. 

In the meantime Chicago met the Giants again on the Polo 
Ground on September 24. and the New York players won 
easily. Mathewson was quite too much for the Chicago batters. 

On the afternoon of September 25 the New Yorks received 
the worst setback wnich had fallen to them since their return 
from the west and the damage which was done in reality had 
more bearing on the outcome of the pennant race, than even 
the famous September 23 game or the beatings which were given 
to the New York team later by the good work of Coveleski. the 
Polish pitcher of the Philadelphia nine, and his companions. 

Two games were booked with the Cincinnatis on this after- 
noon and the Giants lost both. Had they won either they would 
have had the nennant in their grasp as after events proved. Chi- 
cago beat Brooklyn on the same afternoon. In the first con- 
test of September 2." against Cincinnati, the western team 
clearly outplayed the Giants. The New York nine seemed to be 
worn out after its hard fight against Pittsburg and Chicago. 

In the second game of the double header the New Yorks were 
less outplayed than they were badly outlucked. With the bases 




1. Mclntire. Brooklyn; 2. Beebe, St. Louis; 3, Rucker, Brooklyn; 4, 
Bliss, St. Louis; 5, Fromme, St. Louis; 6, Burch, Brooklyn. 

Pictorial News Co., Photo. 

A GROUP OF NATIONAL LEAGUE PLAYERS, 1908. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 109 

filled, Merkle rapped a line hit toward right field, which seemed 
to have started tor a three-base hit, and would surely have won 
for New York, but Egan, the second baseman of the Cincinnati 
nine, stretched full length, made a splendid catch, and practically 
whipped the Giants right there. 

On September 28 the Giants were put to their best paces to 
boar Philadelphia, and Chicago, which had started back for the 
was idle. On the following day the Giants could only 
break even with Philadelphia and Chicago won from Cincin- 
nati. For the first time in more than a month, the Giants were 
out of the lead, as Chicago had at last made its way back to 
first place with the narrow margin of one point lead. 

This lasted but a day, for on September 30 the Giants beat 
Philadelphia. Pittsburg won, and New York was again in first 
place with the champions third, a grand reversal all around. 

All the United States hung on the results of the games which 
remained to be played, for it was by no means certain which 
of the three contending clubs would finish ahead on the last 
day of the season. 

On October 1 the Giants, playing in Philadelphia, were only 
able to break even with the team in that city. Coveleski was 
on the war path against the New Y'ork team. The Polish pitcher, 
who had been loaned by Philadelphia to the Tri-State League 
for the season, had returned to the Quakers just in time to fool 
effectually the New Y'ork batsmen. 

On the afternoon that New York lost one-half of the Phila- 
delphia double-header, Chicago won, and the chances of the 
Giants had been whittled down to a few scant points in per- 
centage, where at one time they had been in front of the 
league with a lead which even some of the conservative deemed 
to be practically safe. 

Pittsburg assumed the lead on October 2 after winning a 
double-header from the St. Louis club. This result had been dis- 
counted both by the New York and Chicago clubs, which ex- 
pected little from St. Louis in the way of a strong finish 
against Pittsburg, the St. Louis nine by that time having lost 
almost any energy which it may have possessed earlier in the 
year. 

New Y'ork played Philadelphia for the eighth time in succes- 
sion on Saturday, October 3, Coveleski was again the con- 
tender against the New York team. If New Y'ork had won this 
game, it would have been impossible for the team to have been 
beaten for the championship. 

In the ninth inning the Giants rallied, and except for over 
anxiety on the part of the batters might have beaten the left 
hand pitcher, who had proved to be their nemesis. "With a man 
on third, who was waiting only the slightest encouragement to- 
get home, the New York batters failed to bring him to the 
plate, and Philadelphia won, with Coveleski in the box against 
Mathewson, by the score of 3 to 2. 

Both Pittsburg and Chicago won on this same afternoon and 
New Y'ork dropped back to third place. The club was only 
separated from the leaders by a mild difference, and it was part 
of the result which was bound to have been expected in view of 
the fact that the race was so close between all three clubs. 

This brought the pennant race to the last game of the year 
between the Chicago and Pittsburg clubs to be played on Sunday 
afternoon in Chicago. It also finished the season for Chicago 
and Pittsburg. One of the clubs was compelled to lose, and if 
the game were played to a tie, there was a chance that New 
Y'ork would slip past both of them and win the championship. 




1, Bresnahan, New York; 2, Konetchy, St. Louis; 3, Murray, St. Louis; 
4. Knabe, Philadelphia; 5, Charles, St. Louis; 6, Lobert, Cincinnati. 

Conlon, Photo. 

A GROUP OF NATIONAL LEAGUE PLAYERS, 1908. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE, HI 

Naturally there was a tremendous throng in Chicago to wit- 
ness the Sunday game. It began with a forceful fight between 
the players of both nines, but as the contest progressed Chicago 
pulled away from Pittsburg, and the game finished with the 
score of 5 to 2 in favor of the champions. Pittsburg's errors 
had been costly. 

That eliminated Pittsburg from the championship race for 
1908. There was no longer ai^ chance for the Pirates to win, 
as they had played their full quota of games, and the question 
of the ownership of the pennant rested between the New York 
and Chicago clubs. 

The situation which now confronted the National League was 
novel to say the least. Both Chicago and Pittsburg were 
through for the year. Chicago was in first place, Pittsburg in 
second place and New York in third place. The Giants, how- 
ever, had three games remaining with Boston. If they should 
win all three they would be tied with Chicago for the cham- 
pionship. 

In the meantime the Board of Directors, realizing the climax 
to which the race was tending, held their meeting in Cincinnati 
with the result which has already been related in this review. 
They ordered the tie game to be played off on the first available 
date in New York which happened to be October 8. They based 
their decision as to playing off the tie on the ground that the 
Chicago club had violated the rights of the New York club by 
making it legally impossible for the Giants to play off the de- 
clared tie of September 23 on September 24. This" was because 
of a protest filed on the night of September 23 by Chicago. 

It was also affirmed by the directors of the league that the 
constitution made it imperative that each club must play 
twenty-two championship games with each other club, and in 
view of that fact they declared it their belief that they were 
authorized to insist upon one game only, after the expiration 
of the regular season, between the New York and Chicago clubs. 

The New York club played with Boston and won all three 
games. They were then tied with Chicago for the champion- 
ship. It may be stated here, by way of explanation, that there 
was still another embarrassing feature to the order to play 
one game to settle the New York and Chicago tie. That was, 
that if the Giants should have happened to have lost one game 
to Boston, and then should have beaten Chicago, there would 
have been a three-cornered tie for the championship between 
New York, Pittsburg and Chicago. This was feared in some 
quarters, but did not materialize, as the New Y^ork players 
beat Boston three straight and the ownership of the 1908 title 
then rested between New York and Chicago. 

On the afternoon of October 8 the final game was played on 
the Polo Ground in New York. This must settle the cham- 
pionship of the National League unless it went to a tie. The 
Chicago club arrived in New York that morning from Chicago 
and the New Y^ork players, while not over-confident of winning, 
hoped that they would be able to save the pennant. 

The game, by the orders of the Board of Directors, was played 
under the rule's which govern games that are controlled by the 
National Commission. This made it impossible for the owner 
of the New York club to sell as many tickets as he believed 
that he would have been justified in selling for a regular season 
contest. 

All New York was mad to see the game, and the result of 
the restricted ticket sale was the mobbing of the ground. The 
fences were beaten down by battering rams. The stand was 




], Seymour, New York; 2, McCarthy, Boston; 3, Bransfield- Phila- 
delphia; 4, McCormick, New York; 5, Ferguson, Boston. 

Photos by Tebbs and Pictorial News Co. 

A GROUP OF NATIONAL LEAGUE PLAYERS, 1908. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



113 



-torn to pieces in some places by the frantic "rooters," who 
were eager to see the sport. . 

The game was won by Chicago. Chance nearly made one or 
the most costly blunders of his 1908 Base Ball career He sent 
Pfiester to pitch for the champions, and if the Giants had played 
ball with the careful attention to detail that they had early m 
the year, they might have made enough runs in the first inning 
to have won. ,, '-■' ■ - . . .. 

Herzog was caught off first base in the first inning, after a 
foolish start for second, and that gave Chicago just enough life 
to relieve the tension under which the players had been working. 
Shortly after this Chance took Pfiester out of the box and 
substituted Brown. It saved the game for Chicago. Mathewson 
pitched for New York and was 
batted in but one inning, but 
iin that inning the champions 
managed to clinch the cham- 
pionship, New York made a 
-desperate rally in the seventh 
inning, when the bases were 
;filled with no one out, and it 
appeared as if Brown were 
; about to be knocked from 
the box. Doyle was substi- 
tuted to bat for Mathewson, 
:and, swinging hard at a low 
♦curve, died on a foul to the 
.catcher. As Doyle had hit 
Brown hard all the year, 
and was one of the batters 
most feared by Chicago, the 
champions breathed a sigh 
of relief when the inn- 
ing was finished and Chi- 
cago had been saved from 
defeat 

It will always be the pride 
of every Base Ball "fan" who 
lived through the season of 
1908, that he had a share as a 
spectator in witnessing this 
marvelous continuation of 
games. It was a fight unpar- 
alleled in Base Ball's history. 
It was a royal tribute to the 
oldest organization in profes- 
sional Base Ball, the first or- 
ganization under which a 
championship season had 
been maintained with a sem- 
blance of continuity 




Chart Showing National League Race; 

New York and Pittsburg tied for second 

place. 



Thus ended the most wonderful race in the history of organ- 
ized Base Ball. There have been other contests in which 
the batting may have been harder, or the pitching may have been 
better. That is largely a matter of personal opinion. There 
have been none, however, in which three clubs came to the last 
week of the season so closely aligned that any one of the three 
might win the championship, and so well matched in playing 
ability that one of them was eliminated in the last game of 
its regular series, while another was put out of the pennant m 
a special game wbich had to be played under order of the Board 
of Directors,. 




1, Hartsel, Philadelphia Athletics, running; N. Clarke, Cleveland, 
catcher; 2, Smith. Athletics; 3, Davis. Athletics; 4, Plank. Athletics; 
5, Collins. Athletics; 6, Schlitzer, Athletics; 7, Blue, Athletics; 8, 
Sullivan, Cleveland; 9, Berger, Cleveland; 10, Birmingham, Cleveland. 

VanOeyen, Photo. 
A GROUP OF AMERICAN LEAGUE PLAYERS, 1908. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



115 



NATIONAL LEAGUE SEMI-MONTHLY STANDING 



PERCENTAGE STANDING APRIL 30. 



Club. Won. Lost. P.C. 

Chicago 8 3 .727 

Pittsburg 7 4 .636 

New York 8 6 .571 

Philadelphia 7 7 .500 



Club. Won. Lost. 

Boston 7 7 

Cincinnati 5 6 

Brooklyn 6 

St. Louis 3 



Chicago 13 

Pittsburg 12 

New York 13 

Philadelphia 12 



PERCENTAGE STANDING MAY 15. 



.650 
.600 
.591 
.571 



Boston 12 

Cincinnati 9 

Brooklyn 9 

St. Louis 9 



PERCENTAGE STANDING MAY 31. 



Chicago 23 13 

Philadelphia 17 14 .548 

New York 19 16 .543 

Cincinnati 19 16 .543 



Pittsburg 18 

Boston 17 

St. Louis 15 

Brooklyn 13 22 



10 

12 
12 
16 
16 

16 
19 
25 



PERCENTAGE STANDING JUNE 15. 



Chicago 30 16 .652 

Pittsburg 27 20 .574 

Cincinnati 26 20 .565 

New York 24 23 .511 



Philadelphia 21 

Boston 22 

St. Louis 22 

Brooklyn 16 



PERCENTAGE STANDING JUNE 30. 



Pittsburg 40 24 .62; 

Chicago 37 23 .617 

New York 37 27 .578 

Cincinnati 34 30 .531 



Philadelphia 27 

Boston 27 

St. Louis 24 

Brooklyn 22 



PERCENTAGE STANDING JULY 15. 



Pittsburg 47 32 .595 

New York 46 32 .590 

Chicago 45 32 .584 

Cincinnati 42 38 .525 



Philadelphia 35 

Boston 35 

Brooklyn 29 

St. Louis 29 



PERCENTAGE STANDING JULY 31. 



Pittsburg 56 36 .609 

Chicago 55 36 .604 

New York 58 37 .590 

Philadelphia 47 40 .541 



Cincinnati 48 

Boston 40 

Brooklyn 33 

St. Louis 31 



PERCENTAGE STANDING AUGUST 15. 



Pittsburg 64 39 .622 

New York 61 40 .604 

Chicago 58 44 .569 

Philadelphia 55 44 .556 



Cincinnati 53 

Boston 46 

Brooklyn 38 

St. Louis 35 



PERCENTAGE STANDING AUGUST 31. 



New York 69 45 . 605 

Chicago 71 47 .602 

Pittsburg 70 47 .598 

Philadelphia 60 52 .536 



Cincinnati 58 

Boston 50 

Brooklyn 43 

St. Louis 42 



PERCENTAGE STANDING SEPTEMBER 15. 



.New York .... 83 46 .644 

Pittsburg 83 51 .619 

Chicago 83 52 .615 

Philadelphia . 71 58 .550 



Cincinnati 
Boston . . 
Brooklyn 
St. Louis 



64 
57 
44 
44 



22 

26 
30 
31 

28 
37 
40 
39 

37 
43 

46 
48 

46 
52 
56 
60 

53 

59 
62 



67 
71 
74 

70 

77 
87 



PERCENTAGE STANDING SEPTEMBER 30. 



New York 93 53 .637 

Pittsburg 95 55 .633 

Chicago 94 55 .631 

Philadelphia . 78 68 .534 



Cincinnati ... 72 77 

Boston . . 63 85 

Brooklyn 49 98 

St. Louis 49 101 



CHAMPIONSHIP PERCENTAGE STANDING. 



Chicago 99 55 .643 

New York 98 56 . 636 

Pittsburg 98 56 .636 

Philadelphia . 83 71 .539 



Cincinnati ... 73 81 

Boston 63 91 

Brooklyn 53 101 

St. Louis 49 105 



P.C. 

.500 
.455 
.429 
.281 

.500 
.429 
.360 
.360 

.529 
.472 
.375 
.371 

.488 
.458 
.423 
.340 

.491 
.422 
.375 
.361 

.486 
.449 
.387 
.377 

.511 
.435 
.371 
.341 

.500 
.438 
.380 
.337 

.492 
.427 
.377 
.362 

.477 
.426 
.336 
.333 

.484 
.426 
.333 
.327 

.474 
.409 
.344 

.318 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



117 




Ban B. Johnson 



American League Season of 1908 

By Irving £. Sanborn, Chicago 

So many sensational features 
crowded themselves into the Ameri- 
can League's diamond campaign of 
1908, that anything resembling a 
comprehensive review is impossible 
even in the liberal space allotted for 
that purpose, and on the threshold 
of retrospection one hesitates to 
select the crowning feature of a 
I season which was so successful from 
every point of view that all previous 
records were eclipsed, not only in 
the matter of prosperity but in the 
intensity of interest aroused. 

The American League has been 
famous for its remarkably close fin- 
ishes, and that fame has been built 
on the foundation of five consecutive 
years in which the pennant has hung 
wavering in the balance until the 
last week of the season. Each sea- 
son, it has seemed, has surpassed in 
the furore it has created all that 
have gone before, until it appeared 
impossible to build up a new record 
or to ring new changes on the re- 
President American League markable situations created. 

Copyright, 1905, by Yet every previous finish was for- 

Chickering Co., Boston gotten in the white heat of last 
October's battle when four of the 
eight American League clubs went into the final jumps of the 
home stretch so closely bunched that there was none brave 
enough to name the winner in advance. There have been close 
struggles at the wire before. The public has seen the pennant 
decided on the final day of the season and by a wild pitch at 
that, but never before has there been a spectacle such as the 
Western patrons of the American League watched in the last 
eight days of the 1908 battle. They saw not only four clubs 
in the race, but those four clubs were pitted against each other 
and their victory or defeat depended upon their own brawn 
and skill and not on the efforts of other teams, as happens 
when pennant contenders are matched with weaker opponents 
during the closing days of a race. 

Nothing like that heart-throbbing struggle in which Detroit, 
Chicago, Cleveland and St. Louis were engaged last fall ever 
had been seen before, and it was not finished until the final 
game of the year between the Tigers and White Stockings on 
the latter's grounds. Never before has a Base Ball club settled 
w T ith a visiting club for almost 65,000 paid admissions in the 
last three days of a Base Ball season. That was what Chicago 
paid Detroit in the last three games played in the Windy City 
on October 4, 5 and 6, and those dates fell on Sunday, Monday 
and Tuesday. Never before has it been necessary to lock the 
gates on the last day of the battle in the American League 
to keep the crowd from swamping the plant and breaking up 
the game. Yet that was what happened on October 8 — -a week 
day in a distinctly Sunday town — when the Tigers did battle 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 119 

with the White Sox in the last game, with a championship 
banner depending on the outcome of that single contest. 

One day earlier, with only forty-eight hours left of the 
season, it had been impossible to determine whether Detroit, 
Chicago or Cleveland would win the flag, and six days before 
that there was nothing certain about the inability of a fourth 
club, St. Louis, to climb to the top by a whirlwind spurt. 

Nor was this denouement the only remarkable thing about 
the American League's campaign. It was sensational all the 
way down the line. Xo less than six of the eight teams were 
in the lead at different times. Four of the teams were con- 
ceded practically cinch chances to carry off the pennant at one 
time or another during the long, hot battle. First New York 
then Chicago, then Detroit and Cleveland were accorded run- 
away opportunities, yet each in turn fell down before it had 
gone far out in front and, at the finish, the scramble was so 
intensely exciting that the attendance increased instead of 
diminished with the waning of the year. 

There was nothing to indicate in the early days of the season 
what the finish would be. The Detroit champions were heavy 
disappointments to their owners and to Manager Jennings in 
the first weeks of the race, when they sJumped to the bottom 
of the list and hung there for the better part of a month. But 
the recovery of the Tigers was even more pronounced than 
their slump had been, and before the first of June they had 
fought themselves into the thick of the fight and never after- 
ward were out of it. For this Manager Jennings and the 
Tigers themselves deserve the highest tribute. It was a 
remarkable test of their fighting ability and bulldog tenacity. 

The Tigers were handicapped at different times by the slump 
in the batting of their champion sticker, Tyrus Cobb, by the 
retrogression of pitcher Ed Seiver ; by the injuries to captain 
Coughlin and shortstop O'Leary, which necessitated switching 
the infield constantly, and finally the employment in the last 
three weeks of the season, of a raw recruit in shortstop Bush, 
who, however, set the grass afire by his playing and did much 
to help win the pennant. The club was fortunate, too, in the 
development of winning pitchers in Summers and Willett, 

The White Stockings, while not as great an early disap- 
pointment as the Tigers, were able to get only a poor start. 
For six weeks Fielder Jones and his men were unable to get 
away from the .500 mark to which it began to look as if they 
were permanently anchored. Manager Jones was handicapped 
by the fact he was working a new combination on the infield. 
due to the acquisition of Parent, who, although a strong 
factor, was new to the team and to the men with whom he 
was working. Moreover, this infield was subject to constant 
changes, because of injuries to every one of the four men on it 
at different times and the final necessity of recalling Isbell 
from Wichita to play first base on account of the straining of 
Donohue's ankle. 

But in early June the White Stockings got together for a 
spurt which shot them into the lead and enabled them to win 
Thirteen straight games, thereby gaining a margin over all 
competitors, which made the public admit the world's cham- 
pions of 1906 were most likely to win the 1908 pennant. Then 
followed the desertion of pitcher Smith over a disinclination for 
morning practice, leaving the White Sox with only two depend- 
able pitchers right in the middle of the season. A slump fol- 
lowed, from which the team did not recover fully until near 
the finish. 




1, Walsh; 2, Davis: 3, Altrock: 4, Parent; 5, Hahn; 6, Fielder Jones. 
Mgr. ; 7, Atz; 8. Sullivan: 9. Isbell; 10, White; 11, Smith: 12, 
Owens; 13, Donahue: 14, Dougherty. Horner, Photo. 

CHICAGO TEAM— AMERICAN LEAGUE. 1908. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 121 

The Cleveland club was the most consistent performer of all 
last season, and not only that, but its season's work was con- 
sistent with its showing in the previous three or four races. 
Starting out as a contender for the lead with the Highlanders, 
Lajoie's men never were out of the race until the last day 
but one of their playing schedule. Then it was a drawn game 
that put them out of it. The loss of the services of Elmer 
Flick and Terry Turner for the entire season were serious 
problems for Manager Lajoie to contend with, but no more 
serious than the injuries to Bradley and to Josh Clarke, the 
mainstay of the catching department, Lajoie was fortunate in 
having such lusty youngsters as Hinchman and Birmingham 
developing well with a second season's experience, and the latter 
player made himself a terror to base-runners all over the circuit 
by his phenomenal throwing. 

Nothing in the season of 1908 was more remarkable than the 
career of the New York Highlanders. With a good getaway 
from the starting line, the hilltop team set out to make what 
looked like a runaway race for the flag, and before the middle 
of May they were so firmly intrenched in first place that the 
general opinion was Griffith had a pennant winner after many 
years of effort. But the belief was not to last long, for before 
May was ended the team started a slump which carried it 
down without stopping and at such speed that in a little over 
five weeks the Highlanders hit the bottom, never to rebound. 

Before this happened the resignation of Manager Griffith was 
announced and the appointment of Norman Elberfeld was made 
to the vacant position. But dissension continued to grow in 
the ranks and finally resulted in the desertion of the crack 
first baseman. Hal Chase, who jumped to the California State 
League. From these combinations of tough luck the team as a 
whole never recovered. 

The St. Louis club enjoyed a great season in every way and 
was one of the pennant contenders from the start until the 
last week of the race, leading in the scramble for awhile late 
in June and early July. The Browns were the only team that 
hung cnto the heels of Detroit when the Tigers made their 
spurt soon after mid-season and gained such a lead they looked 
hopeless to the teams behind them. The trades with the New 
York club by which Manager McAleer added Williams and 
Ferris to the* St. Louis infield and the daring which made him 
willing to add George Edward Waddell to his pitching staff, 
were material factors in putting and keeping that fast aggrega- 
tion in the front rank. 

So enthusiastically did the patrons of St. Louis respond to 
the hopes raised by the Browns that the owners of the club . 
reaped a harvest in coin and helped fill the coffers of other 
clubs with the crowds that were attracted to Sportsman's 
Park. One of these was oflicially stated to be over 26,000, 
which is the St. Louis record and one of the greatest in the 
history of the game. 

The uncertainties of the great national pastime never were 
better illustrated than by the American League's 1908 season. 
Of the four teams in that sensational finish every one — except 
the one that finally won. of course — was knocked out of the 
pennant by some one club in the league which was an easy 
mark for some or all of the other teams. And Detroit was not 
free from a hoodoo opponent. The Washington club, for 
instance, was responsible for Cleveland's failure to win the 
championship, for the Senators won fourteen out of twenty- 
two games with Lajoie's men. Not only that, but Washington 




1, Criss; 2. McAleer; 3. Dineen; 4. Williams; 5, Pelty; 6. Bailey; 
7, T. Jones; 8, Yeager; 9, Hoffman: 10, C. Jones; 11, Ferris; 12, 
Stone; 13, Blue; 14, Wallace; 15, Hartzell: 16. Howell: 17, O'Connor; 
-18, Spencer; 19, Schweitzer; 20, Waddell: 21. Stephens: 22, Powell. 

Copyright, 1908, by Star Photo Co. 
ST. LOUIS TEAM— AMERICAN LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 123 

won seven out of the last eight games played with Cleveland 
during the year. But for that Cleveland surely would have 
landed the flag when it made that grand spurt so close to the 
finish. For this upset in the '•dope'' the Washington club 
and its manager has been attacked in the public prints. 

But that feat had its duplicate in the way the Boston Red 
Sox knocked St. Louis out of the championship. The Massa- 
chusetts men won fifteen out of twenty-two games from the 
Browns, one more than Washington took from Cleveland, and, 
with anything like an even break between Boston and St. Louis, 
McAleer's men would have been on top or mighty close to it at 
the end. 

The White Sox were beaten out by their inability to cope 
with Cleveland, which was such a mark for Washington. Comis- 
key's men won only eight out of twenty-two games with the 
Naps, and to that fact owed their loss of the bunting. Detroit 
owed the difficulty it found in winning the flag to the defeats 
sustained at the hands of Cleveland and the same Boston club 
that was a hoodoo for St. Louis. Detroit could get only an 
even break with the Red Sox. who were beaten sixteen times 
by the White Sox, and the Tigers could win only twelve out 
of twenty-two games with Washington. 

The end of the first week's scramble for the initial advantage 
found St. Louis leading the van with New York second, Boston 
third and Chicago tied for fourth place with the Athletics and 
Cleveland, all three being on the .500 mark. The Detroit cham- 
pions were a bad seventh, having won only one game in the 
first week. Next day New York took the lead, the Browns 
were second, Cleveland advanced to third and Boston retreated 
to fourth place. Then St. Louis regained the lead and held it 
for three days in succession, while the Highlanders ran second 
and Cleveland stuck to third, Boston remaining in the first 
division. Chicago and Detroit, the ultimate pennant contenders, 
were back in the ruck. But the early scramble was too hot 
for the Browns, and by the first of May they had gravitated 
into third place, leaving New York and Cleveland to scrap for 
first honors. It was a merry fight they had, too, for neither 
team was able to hold its position on top longer than two 
days at a time. 

The Athletics made a spurt during the first week in May 
which carried them into the front rank and kept them there 
for a period of four days, during which the Highlanders and 
Naps were battling for second place. St. Louis was anchored 
to fourth spot and the White Sox to the .500 mark, while 
Detroit looked bedraggled in last place. Philadelphia's joy 
was short-lived, however, and lasted only until the 9th of 
May. when New Y'ork once more topped the list and started 
the rush which made it look as if the American League was 
in for a runaway race for the first time in years. Philadel- 
phia clung to second place for quite a spell in a hand-to-hand 
encounter with Cleveland. That was the situation when the 
middle of May arrived and the contestants, passed the first 
milestone of the race. The Highlanders, Athletics, Naps and 
Browns were occupying the first division berths in that order. 
But the second squad had been through something of an up- 
heaval. Detroit then had climbed from last to fifth place, the 
White Sox were sixth. Washington seventh, and Boston's 
youngsters were ensconced in the rear position. 

New York's leadership lasted practically all the rest of the 
month of May. while the western teams were making their 
first eastern invasion. But during this time something was 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 125 

happening behind the leaders. The Athletics began to slip 
shortly after the middle of the month, surrendering second 
place to Cleveland. And the champion Tigers kept on coming 
until they waded through the entire standing in that short 
space of time. Jennings' men pushed the Athletics out of 
third place, then climbed over Cleveland, and finally, on Deco- 
ration Day, they were tied for the lead with New York. But 
it was an awfully tight fit, for the leaders had won only four 
more games than they had lost, and their percentage was only 
.559. Cleveland was only one point behind in third place, 
and St. Louis, in fourth place, was exactly three points from 
the front pair. The runaway race had been turned into a 
neck-and-neck affair already. Next day was Sunday and as 
New York did not play, while Detroit was defeated, the High- 
landers once more were leaders, but only for a couple of days. 
The situation on June 1 saw New York, Detroit. Philadelphia, 
Cleveland and St. Louis closely bunched in the first five places. 
Chicago was a passable sixth and Washington apparently had 
relegated Boston to the rear for good. 

June was a crazy month for American League fans, and 
there were more thorns than roses for several of the racers. 
With its first western trip early in the month New Y'ork started 
the slump which carried it with almost incredible speed down 
the toboggan slide, until it hit the bottom in the record-break- 
ing space of five weeks. Almost at the same time the White 
Stockings started their spurt. 

In seven days Chicago climbed from sixth to first place, but 
while the Sox were climbing the other teams were coming back 
fast. On June 8, when Chicago hit the lead for the first time 
in the race, it had won only three more games than it had 
lost, and its percentage was only .535. Cleveland and St. 
Louis were tied for second place at .533. ■ New Y^ork was 
fourth, but only one point ahead of Philadelphia, their respec- 
tive percentages being .524 and .523. Detroit, although win- 
ning just half its games, was in sixth place, but was only a 
game and a half behind the leaders. Here were six teams 
bunched within the confines of less than two games, and that 
was not all, for Boston had displaced Washington from seventh 
place by a margin so narrow that by actual figures there ex- 
isted a gap of only five and a half games between first and 
last places. Nearly two months of the race had been run and 
there were eight teams which had a chance for the flag if the 
luck broke right. 

The White Stockings kept up their winning streak until they 
had put thirteen straight games to their credit on the "won" 
side of the standing and. with the other teams cutting each 
other's throats, the Chicagoans gained a lead which made it 
look like a runawaj r race again. By the middle of June, Jones 
and his warriors had established a comfortable lead with a 
percentage of .600. Cleveland was second, but hard pushed by 
St. Louis and Detroit. Philadelphia led the second division, 
the Highlanders having already gravitated to sixth place. Bos- 
ton was close up to the toboggan party, and Washington 
adorned a place to which years had made it accustomed. 

After hitting its high water mark for the year, a percentage 
of .625, Chicago slumped badly, losing seven straight games to 
Detroit and Cleveland in the latter part of June. 

The glorious Fourth saw the four clubs which were to fur- 
nish the greatest finish on record already straightened out for 
the race which was to be theirs for the next three months 
and more, and already it was a red-hot scramble. Cleveland 




v -1- ~ ~ - 



1. Bender; 2. Sehreck: 3. Oldring: 4. Xicholls; 5, Barry: 6. Vickers: 

7, Coombs; 8, Isbell (Chicago Americans,). *Conlon. Photo. 

A GROUP OF PHILADELPHIA AMERICAN LEAGUE PLAYERS, 190S. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 127 

and St. Louis divided the laurels of leading during the first 
half of July and divided them fairly equally. But the con- 
tenders were bunched so tightly that frequently one of them 
would drop from first to third place in a day. Chicago and 
Detroit were right on the heels of the other two clubs, and 
the league standing was subjected to a diurnal shuffling which 
kept everyone on tip-toe with excitement. 

July 15 brought forth a new leader. That was the date 
when Detroit gained the top for the first time undisputedly. 
Once before the Tigers had been there earlier in the season, 
but only in a deadlock with New York for one day. At this 
time St. Louis was second, having been just displaced from the 
lead by the champions. Cleveland and Chicago were having a 
battle for third place a part of a lap behind the other two. 

This date marked the beginning of the third apparent run- 
away in the American League. The Tigers having once got 
their claws in the top round of the ladder refused for a long 
time to let go. Not only that, but they used their hind legs 
to push their contenders back until the pennant was conceded 
to them by the general public. For more than two months — 
from July 15 to September 21, to be accurate — Detroit main- 
tained itself in the lead. But it was not always a comfort- 
able berth. Only in the hot month of August were the cham- 
pions at their best and going away in safety. 

There was only one change in the first division during the 
first fortnight of August. Cleveland pushed Chicago out of 
third place in that time. Detroit continued merrily on its 
way, slightly increasing its lead over St. Louis, which found 
the pace a bit too fast. On August 15, with four months of 
ihe six gone, Detroit's lead looked safe enough. St. Louis was 
beginning to look anxiously back at the Naps, whose spurt 
lifted them close to second place and gained considerably on 
the White Sox, who looked as if they would have to be con- 
tent with fourth position. 

Near the end of August, with Frank Smith back in the fold, 
the White Sox got a strangle hold on their second wind and 
started something which made a lot of trouble. Before the 
end of that month Jones's men had overhauled Cleveland and 
were right on the top of St. Louis and Detroit, both of whom 
had slumped, the champions being broken up by the injury of 
the whole left side of their infield. In fact, the leaders went 
back as fast as the White Sox and Cleveland came forward, so 
that when the first of September arrived the champions had a 
mark of only .581 in percentage. St. Louis had come back 
faster than that and was only half a game ahead of the White 
Sox, who in turn were exactly the same margin ahead of 
Cleveland. Philadelphia took a brief spurt and passed the .500 
mark to keep out of Boston's reach, but the Athletics could 
not hold that gait, as events proved. 

The death struggle between the westerners was on and it 
lasted until the very end. Just previous to Labor Day the 
White Sox gave the Naps a fierce trouncing in Chicago and 
this enabled them to displace St. Louis from second position. 
Then came the holiday and its double revenge for Cleveland, 
which defeated the White Sox twice in the presence of two 
great crowds at the Nap ball park. That, combined with a 
double victory for Detroit over St. Louis on the same day, 
gave the Tigers a firmer grasp on the lead and eventually 
turned the scale in their favor. 

From Cleveland the White Sox went to Detroit, where a 
remarkable series of games was in store for them. Five games 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 129 

were, scheduled for as many successive days and Chicago was 
three and a half games behind the Tigers. Jones and his men 
should have won all five games but sloughed two of them. 
The first was Chicago's by the easy margin of 5 to 2, but the 
remaining four were fierce battles, every one of them going 
into extra innings. 

The second game with Detroit probably was the worst of 
the season in the major leagues. 

Chicago lost the third game by more bad work, although 
it was not so crazily nlayed, the final score being 6 
to 5, Detroit scoring the winning run in the last half of the 
tenth inning. The White Sox won the fourth game 4 to 2, 
but had to play eleven innings to win it ; then they followed 
this up with a ten-inning victory by a 2 to 1 score in the 
fifth and last game. Those four consecutive extra-inning bat- 
tles set a new record, so far as known, for a series between 
two teams, the rivals playing forty-three innings in four days. 

Right there Cleveland began a spurt which carried it out in 
front and made Lajoie's men pronounced favorites for the pen- 
nant before the month was over. The Naps went to Chicago 
and defeated the White Sox in four straight games. While 
this was going on St. Louis and Detroit broke even in four 
games. When this was over, on September 16, Detroit had a 
narrow lead over Cleveland. Chicago was third and St. Louis 
fourth. The second division had Philadelphia and Boston tied 
for fifth, with Washington closing up. New York held its own. 

The final trip of the eastern clubs through the west fol- 
lowed, and Cleveland made a steady clean-up as each eastern 
team reached that city. The Naps were going at a terrific 
clip, and although the other three western teams were win- 
ning the majority of their games, Cleveland gained enough 
so that on September 21 it was in the lead by the tenuous 
margin of two points over the Tigers. Chicago was a tight 
third and St. Louis so close that only three games separated 
the Browns from the leaders. Four teams had a stalwart 
chance for the flag and the wire was only two weeks off. 
Those were the days when all eight teams in the league coined 
money, for the four western cities were turning out big crowds 
daily on account of the intense interest in their battle and 
the visiting eastern clubs were naturally profiting by it. 

Everything went smoothly for Cleveland, and preparations 
were being made for a possiDle World's Series there, when 
Washington reached that town and proceeded to take two out 
of three games from the Naps. This setback, while it did not 
immediately deprive Lajoie's men of the lead, left them such a 
narrow margin that on September 27, by playing a postponed 
game while Cleveland w^as idle, Detroit regained the lead by a 
single point, the percentages being .576 and .575. The Tigers 
never let go of that hold, although it was a desperate battle 
they had to hang on. At that time the White Sox were only 
three points behind Cleveland and were exactly one game be- 
hind the lead. St. Louis, in fourth place, was close enough 
to have a chance to win out with a spurt, and there were only 
nine days of the season left. Detroit won three straight from 
Washington while Cleveland was taking three from Philadel- 
phia. At the same time the White Sox won three straight 
from Boston, having to win one game twice, as it ended in a 
ten-inning tie the day before. In that series Ed Walsh per- 
formed the feat of winning two games of a double-header. 

Then came the real tug-of-war, after a rest of two days for 
the western clubs, which had five games apiece to settle the 




1, Elberfeld: 2, Chase; 3, Kleinow; 4, Keeler; 5, Chesbro; 6, Man- 
ning; 7, O'Rourke; 8, Ball; 9, Hemphill; 10, Lake; 11, La Porte; 
12, Conroy; 13, Moriarty. Horner, Photo. 

NEW YORK TEAM— AMERICAN LEAGUE, 1908. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



131 



pennant, and every game among themselves. The White Sox 
went to Cleveland for two games and St. Louis to Detroit for 
the same number. The Tigers won both of their games, there- 
bv gaining on the Naps and White Sox, who split even. Those 
two games in Cleveland will not be forgotten by anyone who 
saw or read of them. _ • 

St. Louis was out of the race by this time, but Detroit, 
Cleveland and Chicago were in it, and there were only three 
more games for each to play. Detroit went to Chicago for the 
finish and Cleveland to St. Louis. Cleveland could then win 
the pennant if it won three games from St. Louis and if Chi- 
cago defeated Detroit twice. The White Sox could win the 
pennant only by defeating the Tigers three straight and by 
having St. Louis win one game from the Naps. The White 
Sox won the first game with Detroit, but Cleveland ran into a 
ten-inning tie with St. Louis. The Naps still could win, how- 
ever if they could score three victories and if the Sox could 
win 'one more game. The Chicagoans had to take their re- 
maining two. Three teams were in the race with two days' play. 

On October 5 the White Sox again defeated the Tigers, put- 
ting themselves within one game of the coveted lead, but 
Cleveland lost its chance for the pennant by dropping the first 
game of a double-header put on to play off the tie of the 
previous day. On the eve of the last day of the season in 
the west Detroit held the lead^by half a game. Chicago was 
second by a single point in 
the percentages over Cleve- 
land, which could not quite 
tie the Tigers even if the 
final game in Chicago was 
-not played. . 

The afternoon of October 

6 saw the Tigers and White 
Stockings playing in Chicago 
behind locked gates, as Presi- 
dent Comiskey of the latter 
team did not risk overcrowd- 
ing his park for fear inter- 
ference by the rooters might 
affect his team's chances. On 
that final game of the schedule 
depended the pennant and a 
slice of the World's Series 
receipts. The decision was 
not in doubt for long. Detroit 
scored four runs in the first 
off White, and eventually won 

7 to 0, Donovan holding the 
White Sox down to two hits. 
Cleveland won its final game 
with St. Louis and nosed 
Chicago out of second place, 
although the White Sox in 
third place were only a 
game and a half from the 
leaders 

There may be better fin- 
ishes in the American League 
in future years, but they will 
have to be ties to be any 
tighter. 




Chart Showing American League Race. 




1, Shipke, Washington: 2. Hughes, Washington; 3. Murphy. Athletics: 
4, Smith. Chicago Americans: 5. Davis, Chicago Americans: 6. McBride. 
Washington: 7. Walsh. Chicago Americans: 8. Fielder Jones. Chicago 
Americans: 9, Owen, Chicago Americans; 10. Altrock, Chicago Ameri- 
cans. YanOeyen & Conlon, Photos. 

A GROUP OF AMERICAN LEAGUE PLAYERS. 1908 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



133 



AMERICAN LEAGUE SEMI-MONTHLY STANDI NG 



PERCENTAGE STANDING APRIL 30. 



Club. Won. Lost. P.C. • Club. 

New York 8 5 .615 

Cleveland S 5 .615 

■St. Louis 9 6 

Philadelphia 8 7 .533 



Boston 7 

Chicago 7 

Washington 5 

Detroit 3 



Won. Lost. 



PERCENTAGE STANDING MAY 15. 



New York 15 8 .652 

Philadelphia 15 10 .600 

Cleveland 12 10 .545 

St. Louis 13 12 .520 



Detroit 11 

Chicago 11 

Washington 9 

Boston 8 



PERCENTAGE STANDING MAY 31. 



New York 19 15 .559 

Detroit 20 16 .556 

St. Louis 21 18 .538 

Philadelphia 20 18 .520 



Cleveland 19 

Chicago 17 

Washington 17 

Boston 15 



PERCENTAGE STANDING JUNE 15. 

Chicago 30 20 .600 , Philadelphia 24 

Cleveland 29 22 .569 New York 23 

St. Louis 20 23 .558 Boston 24 

Detroit 26 24 .520 I Washington 18 

PERCENTAGE STANDING JUNE 30. 



St. Louis 38 28 .594 

Cleveland 37 26 .587 

Chicago 36 28 .563 

Detroit 34 29 .54') 



Philadelphia 28 

Boston 29 

New York 26 

Washington 22 



PERCENTAGE STANDING JULY 15. 



Detroit 47 32 .595 

St. Louis 46 33 .582 

Cleveland 44 34 .564 

Chicago 44 35 .557 



Philadelphia 38 

Boston 35 

Washington 30 

New York 29 



PERCENTAGE STANDING JULY 31. 



Detroit 57 35 .620 

St. Louis 56 38 .598 

Chicago 52 41 .559 

Cleveland 49 43 .533 

PERCENTAGE 

Detroit 63 40 .612 

St. Louis 61 44 .581 

Cleveland 60 45 .571 

Chicago 59 47 .557 

PERCENTAGE 

Detroit 68 48 .586 

St. Louis 67 50 .573 

Chicago 66 52 .559 

Cleveland 66 53 .555 

PERCENTAGE 
... 76 56 



Philadelphia 44 

Boston 43 

Washington 35 

New York 32 

STANDING AUGUST 15. 

Philadelphia 49 

Boston 50 

Washington 41 

New York 33 

STANDING AUGUST 31. 

Philadelphia 5S 

Boston 56 

Washington 48 



New York 



Detroit . . 

"Cleveland 

Chicago .. 

St. Louis 



i • > 



60 

60 

73 60 

PERCENTAGE 
61 



Detroit 
Cleveland 

Chicago 85 

St. Louis .... 82 



STANDING SEPTEMBER 
.576 Philadelphia . 

.559 Boston 

. 555 Washington . . 
.548 New York . . . 
STANDING SEPTEMBER 



87 62 



65 



.588 
.584 

.r,7s 
.558 



Boston 

Philadelphia 

Washington 

New York . 



38 
15. 
64 
65 
59 
44 
30. 
70 



Detroit 

Cleveland .... 90 

Chicago 88 

St. Louis 83 



CHAMPIONSHIP PERCENTAGE 



63 
64 
64 
69 



.588 
.584 

.579 
.547 



61 

48 
STANDING. 



Boston 

Philadelphia . 68 

Washington . . 67 

New York ... 51 



11 

12 
14 
17 

18 
19 
20 
29 

26 
26 
30 
32 

28 
37 
36 
40 

38 
44 
47 
50 

46 
50 



52 
55 
62 

70 

57 
62 
66 



68 
69 
71 
88 



80 
82 
97 

79 

85 

85 

103 



P.C. 
.500 
.500 
.357 
.250 

.500 

.478 
.391 - 
.326 

.514 
.472 
.459 
.385 

.480 
.469 
.444 
.360 

.500 
.439 
.419 
.355 

.500 
.443 
.390 
.367 

.489 
.462 
.389 
.348 

.489 
.476 
.398 
.320 

.504 
.475 
.421 
.325 

.485 
. 485 
.454 
.333 

.479 
.448 
.427 
.331 

.487 
.444 
.441 
.331 



SPALDING'S .OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 135 

Honor to the Sport 

Four very interesting events took place during the season of 
1908 and thiee of them were decidedly unusual. All of them 
were so noteworthy that they deserve a place on the records 
• of the year. 

WAGXER DAY. 

Wagner Day was a tribute to a wonderful player. Its date 
was July 17, 1908. The Base Ball enthusiasts of Pittsburg, 
aroused to a sense of the grand work which had been done by 
a player who is popular the country over, and urged by the 
'sporting editor of the Pittsburg Dispatch, Charles B. Power?;, 
to award a fit testimonial to the great shortstop for his long 
and honorable career on the diamond, presented Wagner with a 
magnificent gold watch, valued at more than $600, an elegant 
charm, and last, but not least— the gift of a boy enthusiast — 
a game cock. The latter was particularly appropriate in view 
of the fondness of the ball player for chicken farming. 

"cy" young day. 

"Cy" Young Day was devoted by the enthusiasts of that 
splendid Base Ball city — Boston — to testifying to the veteran 
pitcher who has been in the harness since the beginning of the 
present century, abundant evidence of the regard in which they 
nold him. 

A Base Ball game was played between the Boston American 
League team and a team composed of all stars from the Ameri- 
can League. The afternoon selected was August 12, 190S, a 
day on which no American League game was scheduled in 
Boston. 

The score was 3 to 2 in favor of the All Stars, in eleven 
innings. Boston players were attired in burlesque costumes, 
which amused the crowd greatly. The hero of the afternoon 
was dressed as a farmer. 

In addition to the gate receipts, which amounted to more 
than $8,000, and which were given to the player, he received 
a silver trophy from the Boston Post, a silver loving cup from 
the American League players, a beautiful floral horseshoe from 
George B. Dovey, President of the Boston National League 
club ; a traveling case with gold mounted equipment from the 
j umpires of the American League : a splendid basket of flowers 
" from the players of his own team, and a silver piece which 
had been purchased by subscription of New England "fans." 
Lieut. -Governor Draper made the presentation speeches and 
22,000 spectators cheered until the big fellow doffed his cap 
again and again in delighted confusion. 

* OLD BOSTON PROFESSIONALS VS. OLD COLLEGE PLAYERS. 

The game between the old professionals who at some stage 
of their career had worn the Boston uniform and the old col- 
lege players brought men to the diamond w T ho had not been 
seen on a Base Ball diamond in years. A. G. Spalding, the 
pitcher who made all the United States ring with Base Ball 
enthusiasm in the days of the mighty Bostons and the Chi- 
cagos, traveled all the way from California to take part in the 
game, and to the complete astonishment of his old comrades, 
fooled them as badly as he did in the days when every Base 
Ball "fan" from one ocean to the other followed his record 
with keen interest. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



137 



The score of this game is reproduced that an idea may be 
had of the skill of the veterans in the contest. More than 
that, it shows all the men who took part. 

The score reads : 

PROFESSIONALS. 

AB. R. BH. TB. PO. A. E. 

Spalding '71, pitcher 2 10 

O'Rourke r 73, catcher-3d base 2 116 2 

Murnane '76, 1st base 2 .1 1 1 O 

Morrill '76, 2d base, 1st base 4 2 2 2 7 

Schaefer '71, 3d base 3 1 

Wood, W. '80, shortstop 4 12 4 2 3 

Barrows '71 1 

Hawes '79, center field 3 

Manning '73 4 1 2 2 1 

Whitney '76, left field 2 1110 

Bond '77, pitcher 2 11 1 

McCarthy '85, centre field 2 113 10 1 

Hurley '86, catcher, 3d base 2 11110 1 

Hackett '83, centre field 10 110 

Gunning '85 1 

Nash '85, 3d base 10 2 

Totals 39 7 12 16 21 7 6 



COLLEGE MEN. 

AB. R. BH. TB. PO. A. E. 

Hooper (Harvard '75), pitcher 11110 

Tyng (Harvard '76), catcher-3d base 1 1 0*3 3 3 

Kent (Harvard '75), 1st base 10 114 

Coolidge (Harvard '81), 2d base-ss. 3 110 

F. Thayer (Harvard '78), 2d base. .. 10 110 10 

Nunn (Harvard '79), shortstop 10 110 10 

Latham (Harvard '77) 10 

Elder (Yale '73), center field 1 o 

Hopkins (Iowa '77), right field 10 

Sawyer (Harvard '77). right field... 1 0.0 1 

Thayer (Dartmouth '79), right field. 10 

Carter (Yale '78), pitcher 10 

Woodward (Amherst '81), catcher... 10 

Burt (Harvard '82), 1st base 10 3 

Fearing (Harvard '82), center field.. 10 

Blair (Amherst '81), center field 10 110 

Folsom (Harvard '81) 1 

Badger (Yale '82), 2d base-3d base. . 2 2 
Rollin (Mass. I. of T. '79), catcher.. 10 10 

C. Smith (Harvard '86), pitcher 2 10 10 

Hubbard (Yale '83), catcher 2 113 1 

Plimpton (Amherst '76), 1st base.. 2 3 

Beaman (Harvard '85), 3d base 1 1.1 1 

Foster (Harvard '87), left field 1112 2 1 

Crocker .(Harvard '85), center field.. 10 

Winslow (Harvard '85), right field.. 10 110 

Flagg (Harvard '66), catcher 

Totals 32 5 10 11 21 7 5 

Innings .' 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 

Professionals 1 2 2 2—7 

Amateurs 2 O 1 2 0—5 

Two-bast hit— (Foster. Three-base hits— McCarthy, Wood. Stolen 
bases — Tyng, Murnane. Morrill, Hurley, Badger. First base on balls, 
off Carter. Struck out— By Spalding, 2; by Bond, 4; by Carter, 2; by 




«»VlN TRItO TOSCORC THE i.^riE 



COi. BENTON 



1, A. G. Spalding pitching: 2, A. G. Spalding at bat; 3, A. G. 

Spalding and Walter Badger "choosing" for innings. 
THE OLD TIME BASE BALL PLAYERS, BOSTON, SEPTEMBER 

24. 1908. 
Photos from the Boston Herald; cartoons by Goldsmith in Boston Globe. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 139 

Smith, 2. Double play — Tyng to Kent. Wild pitches — Hooper, Carter, 
Spalding. Time — 1 hour 40 minutes. Umpires — Louis A. Frothing- 
ham, James A. Gallivan, Joseph Kelley. 

The players were cheered heartily as they walked on the 
field, the veteran of all, Mr. Spalding, leading the '"pros." 

Said the Boston Herald : 

Next to Abraham Lincoln and George Washington the name of A. G. 
Spalding is the most famous in American literature. It has been blaz- 
oned forth on the covers of guides to all sorts of sports, upon bats 
and gloves and all the various accoutrements of the same sports for 
many years. Young America gets his knowledge of the past in the 
world of athletics from something that has Al Spalding on it in big 
black letters, and for that reason as much as any other, he is one of the 
national figures of the times. Back in the years from '71 to '75, when 
Al pitched for Boston, he was one of the great men of the game. 
For several innings yesterday his graceful underhand swing had the 
collegians standing on their heads, to use contemporary parlance. 

Leading the collegians was Capt. Walter I. Badger of Yale of the 
early eighties. Badger and Spalding stopped at the home plate and, 
in* the midst of the collected all-star cast, chose up sides. The old- 
time process of hand-over-hand or_ a ball club was gone through. 
Badger won by a very slight margin and leading his collegians took 
the "outs" at once. 

There was no preliminary warming up. That didn't go in the old 
days. Capt. Spalding simply strode to the bat and called for a high 
ball. Calling for a high ball in those days didn't mean what it does 
to-day. It was simply a notice to the pitcher that he could put it 
over at that height and the batter would endeavor to the best of his 
ability to knock the cover off the ball. 

Spalding had his eye with him and, connecting with a fine shoot, 
sent it whizzing to short, where Nunn gathered it in and, making a 
fine throw, retired his man at first. 

Next came Jim O'Rourke. Jim is still playing Base Ball down in 
the little old Connecticut League. More than thirty years ago he 
played in Boston as a member of the Boston teams of '73 to '79. 
Jim is still there with the wing, a present-day wonder of Base Ball. 
Having had some practice, it is not to be wandered at that James 
singled. Then Tim Murnane. the first baseman of the professionals 
and a member of the Bostons in the '70s, beat out an infield hit. 
Tim beating out a hit to the infield is something that the crowd 
wouldn't have missed for a million dollars, more or less. Then John 
Morrill, who was to hold down second, got first on an error by a 
mix-up in the collegians' infield, ;;nd the bases were filled. 

Did Hooper hesitate? Not a bit. No more than he use to when 
the Yale stands were up in arms and raising the old Ned of a noise 
for a Yale score. Instead he fanned Harry Schaefer, the old Boston 
third baseman, and Catcher Jim Tyr.g. who had replaced Fifing. 
dropped the ball, then picked it up. touched home and threw to first 
and retired the side for as neat a double play as was ever pulled off 
on the American League grounds." 

The crowd was a great tribute, to Base Ball as a sport and 
to the interest in its history. The committee in charge of the 
affair consisted of the following : Everett C. Benton. John F. 
Morrill. Frederick W. Thayer, George B. Billings. Samuel E. 
Winslow. Walter I. Badger. William H. Coolidge, Thomas H. 
Bond, Walter S. Barnes, Jr., Timothy Murnane and William F. 
Garcelon. 

The banquet at the Algonquin Club in the evening served as 
a cement to seal the bond of good-fellowship between the dia- 
mond veterans. 

A. G. Spalding was among the early speakers. He related 
his connection with the first professional Base Ball teams in 



SrALDIXG'S uiFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 141 

Boston, and then told for the first time his reason for his 
removal to Chicago with other players in 1875. 

"It was for the good of the game," he said. "The Boston team 
at that time was invincible. Chicago was on the point of throwing' 
up the sponge because of its failure to secure a first-class team. I 
went to Chicago, where I interested President Hurlburt, and then 
followed the organization of the National League, done, I may add, 
to prevent the carrying out of a; threat to blacklist any player who 
signed a contract with another club, something of which I was 
guilty. The reforms followed that wiped out the gambling element, 
and the stigma that attached to a professional gradually but none 
the less surely died out. Gentlemen, I assure you that, looking back, 
I am proud of the fact that I am a professional Base Ball player." 

He referred "in glowing terms to the fact that the National 
Game got its first real start in Boston. 

''Just as Boston was the cradle of liberty for the nation, so also 
was it the cradle in which the infant game was helped to a healthy 
maturity." he added. ''The work of the early Boston teams, with 
Harry Wright — God bless him — Messrs. Adams. Porter, George Wright 
and other Nestors of Base Ball, left its impress for all that is good 
in the national game. Base Ball is fast getting a foothold in the 
remote parts of the world, and the time is surely coming when it 
will be the universal field sport of the world." 

Others who spoke were John F. Morrill, Boston '76-88 ; 
George Richardson, Beacon Base Ball Club : Webster Thayer, 
Dartmouth '79 : C. H. Taylor, Iver W. Adams, first president 
Boston Base Ball Club : Charles Porter, successor to Mr. 
Adams ; Joseph J. Keller, manager of the Boston Nationals : 
Timothy H. Murnane of the Boston Globe, and President of 
the New England League, and Walter I. Badger, Yale \82. 

Col. E. C. Benton occupied the center of the table of honor. 
On his right were A. G. Spalding. Boston '71-75 : Walter I. 
Badger. Yale '82 : C. H. Taylor. On the left of Col. Benton 
were John Morrill. '76-88 ; Samuel J. Elder, Yale '73. Later 
Col. Benton gave way to Sam Winslow, Harvard '85, who acted 
as toastmaster. 

Others present included : 

William Garcelon, Harvard '95 ; John A. Lowell, Lowell club 
'61 ; Allen Hubbard, Yale S3 ; S. Henry Hooper, Harvard '75- ; 
Samuel A. Hopkins. Iowa club '77 : Walter B. Phillips, Har- 
vard '86 : Clarence W. Smith, Harvard '86 ; George W. Foster, 
Harvard '87; George M. Richardson. Beacons '79; Harry C. L. 
Beaman. Harvard '85 ; George F. Booth, Worcester ; William A. 
Lvtle. Governor's council : Webster Thaver, Dartmouth '80 ; W. 
D. Sullivan, Harvard 'S3 ; W. S. Barnes. Jr.. Harvard '84 ; 
Herbert S. Kempton. Boston ; Iver W. Adams, Boston^ club 
'71-72 ; Frank W. Blair. Amherst '80 ; Rufus S. Woodward, 
Amherst '80 ; F. T. Whitney, Charles F. Carter, Yale '78 ; 
Charles M. Porter, second president Boston club, '74 ; Charles 
D. Burt, Harvard '82 ; J. W. Rollins, Jr.. M. I. T. '78 ; William 
H. Folsom, Harvard '81 ; Edward T. Fearing, Harvard '82 ; 
Jay B. Benton, Charles Orrin Buld, Live Oaks of Lynn ; Jacob 
C. Morse. George Wood. '86-92 ; Peter F. Kellev, Jeremiah J. 
Hurlev. Boston '86,; Thomas F. McCarthy. Boston '86-87, 
'92-95 : Thomas L. Gunning. Boston '83-86 ; W. H. Hawes, 
Lowells '75 ; John E. Manning, Boston '73-78 ; Thomas H. 
Bond, Boston '77-82 : Joseph J. Kellev, Boston '91-1907-08 ; 
James A. Gallivan, Harvard '88 ; William H. Kehew, George 
H. Flint. George F. Quincv. Timothy H. Murnane. Boston 
'73-78 ; William H. Coolidge/ Harvard '81 ; C. H. Taylor. 




1, Cy Young; 2, McConnell; 3, Arellanes; 4, Criger; 5, Cicotte; 6, 
Stahl; 7, Carrigan; 8, Cravath; 9, Lord; 10, Burchell; 11, Thoney. 

VanOeyen, Photo.. 

A GROUP OF BOSTON AMERICANS, 1908. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 143 

OLD TIMERS' DAY IX CLEVELAND. 

The East did not enjoy a monopoly of the reunions among 
the old ball players which took place during the season of 
1908. Very likely the prosperity and abundant success of the 
game had much to do with bringing the old fellows together, 
and in Cleveland, where there was success most of the year, 
there was a contest between a team composed of some of the 
best known ball players of the diamond, and a local nine, called 
the Nationals. 

The team of old timers was made up of McKean. shortstop, 
for years the hard batting shortstop of the old Cleveland nine ; 
Twitchell, left field, former left fielder for Cleveland and pitcher 
for Detroit ; Ardner, an old second baseman ; Battin at third ; 
Strief. of the Forest Citys of the TO's : also at second. Wise, 
the famous Boston shortstop at second; Zimmer behind the bat; 
Stemmeyer, the old pitcher, at 'first base; Hotaling — "Pete" — of 
the fame of twenty years ago. in right field : '-Red" McMillan 
at center field, and "Eddie" Seward and Briggs, pitchers. 

Every one of those players in some team or another had 
achieved fame on the diamond. Strief had the reputation in 
his day of being one of the most graceful players on the field. 
Zimmer is the catcher who inaugurated the idea of long dis- 
tance records. He caught all of one season without missing a 
game, merely to show that it was possible for such a thing 
to be done. 

The old timers were altogether too much for the other fel- 
lows. They won by the score of 9 to 2. Twitchell batted as 
if he had not been out of harness a year ; McKean hit with his 
old force ; Sam Wise lined out a two-bagger, and Stemmeyer, a 
bigger man than he was when a pitcher, managed to hit the 
half safely when it would do some good. It was the good bat- 
ting of the old fellows which won for them, although the vet- 
eran pitchers proved to be puzzles to the Nationals in spite 
of the fact that neither of them had been in the box very regu- 
larly. 

While the game was in progress Charley Bennett, the old 
Boston catcher, who happened to be in the city, made his appear- 
ance on the field and was surrounded in a moment by the play- 
ers, some of whom had not seen him for several years. The 
handshaking among the veterans was almost as interesting as 
the game. 




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SITAXDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 145 

The Minor Leagues 

Taken collectively, as we look at the season from all sides, 
and comparing the present status of the minor leagues with 
'what it was ten, or even five years ago in Base Ball, it is 
safe to say that the year of 1908 was the most successful in 
the history of the sport. 

It is true that not every club in every minor league made a 
profit on the season's work, and it is also true that a long 
time may elapse before such shall be the case. Nor did every 
jninor league amass a surplus. It would be foolish to estab- 
lish a claim that could not be verified, in view of the fact that 
there is a certain precariousness to the minor league situa- 
tion, which will exist until the control of minor leagues is 
grounded thoroughly on common sense principles and the mem- 
bers of minor leagues, individually, will faithfully live up to 
the rules of their organization. 

Yet Base Ball thrived and prospered in the minor leagues, 
and in some of them it thrived and prospered beyond all 
previous experience, if in others it did not result in any ma- 
terial gain to the promoters and to those who are in charge 
of the affairs of the smaller organizations. 

During the winter there has been legislation in the concerns 
of the minor leagues which, we believe, is likely to result in 
prosperity even greater than that of 1908. 

The American Association and the Eastern League, composed 
of cities with populations mounting far into the thousands, 
for a long time had made an effort to secure a classification 
of their own in the National Association, on the ground that 
their affairs were of too much importance to be controlled and 
hampered by leagues of smaller size and with far less at stake, 

The common sense side of this argument was admitted, after 
much legislation and debate, and at the conference meeting 
which was held in Cincinnati this past winter, both of these 
leagues were advanced to Class AA, second only in importance 
to the National League and the American League. 

This will probably prove beneficial to everybody for the 

reason that it will satisfy the patrons of the cities to which 

these leagues belong, and it will give to them the privilege of 

legislating upon their own affairs, and virtually being a third 

K part of the great Base Ball organization. 

The advancement in classification of these leagues can in no 
manner injure the welfare of the leagues of lesser importance. 
Their organization is as firm and compact now as it was be- 
fore this action was agreed upon. At the same time that the 
Eastern League and the American Association were advanced 
in classification, the Pacific Coast League was also placed in 
% Class AA, in compliance with an agreement which was made 
when this league joined organized Base Ball. 

From the present outlook it is safe to predict that the 
minor leagues will advance and prosper in the season to come, 
as the country advances and prospers, and that their growth 
for their own good as well as for that of the National Game 
will be greater than ever. 

The quality of players in the minors in 1908 was superior, 
as was quickly in evidence when the larger leagues began to 
look for new talent to fill their teams. There was barely a 
club that escaped in the hunt for promising men, and it is the 
boast of the minor leagues, and a boast which has substantial 
foundation, that they turned out better men last year than in 
any season in which they have been organized. 




M. H. SEXTON, J. H. FARRELL, 

President. Secretary. 

National Association Professional Base Ball Leagues. 




1, P. T. Powers, President Eastern League; 2, Joseph D. O'Brien, 
President American Association; 3. W. M. Kavanaugh, President 
Southern Association; 4. Norris O'Neill. President Western League; 
5, J. Cal. Ewing, President Pacific Coast League. 

A GROUP OF MINOR LEAGUE PRESIDENTS. 







., William H. Watkins, President Indianapolis; 2, William R a 
mour, President Toledo: 3. Charles S HayeDor President Milwau-. 
kee- 4, T. M. Chivington, Vice-President and General Manager 
Louisville: 5. William J. Clymer. Manager Columbus: «• M - ^ 
Keller. Manager St. Paul; 7, M. E. Cantillon, President and Man- 
ager Minneapolis. 

A GROUP OF AMERICAN ASSOCIATION CLUB OFFICIALS. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 149 

American Association 

By A. R. Kling, Indianapolis, Ind. 

From an artistic as well as a financial standpoint the season 
of 1908 was the best the American Association ever had. Start- 
ing with immense crowds on the eastern side of the circuit, the 
season ended with a grand battle, in which four clubs partici- 
pated, Indianapolis winning the pennant only two days before the 
schedule was completed. The race was close all the way and the 
interest was sustained, even in the second division towns. 

This was the second tim3 that Indianapolis had fought it out 
with Louisville for a pennant and, as on the former occasion, the 
Watkins crowd won. In the first year of the organization's his- 
tory the final battles were fought in Minneapolis and St. Paul, 
but with these two clubs playing a large part of their games at 
home the receipts during the last two weeks were immense. Until 
within ten or twelve days of the end of the season, the Columbus 
and Toledo clubs were in the fight, giving the East a clean sweep 
for season honors. 

There were many reasons for the success of the Association, but 
perhaps one of the most potent was the brilliancy of play of 
many of the young players who were tried out. The organization 
was especially fortunate in having many young pitchers who won 
the fancy of the fans and were drawing cards wherever the teams 
played. Marquard of Indianapolis, Adams of Louisville, Woods 
and Brandom of Kansas City and West of Toledo were among the 
youngsters who had especially prosperous seasons and who more 
than made good the predictions of the early spring. 

The winning of the pennant by Indianapolis was considerable 
of a surprise all over the circuit. While the Indiana fans ex- 
pected the team to play good ball, they were hardly prepared 
for the fighting quality which Manager Carr's men displayed. 

At the outset of the season it seemed that several teams were 
stronger than Indianapolis. It was generally predicted and feared 
in their home that the Indians would wilt when the final test 
should come. But the youngsters under Carr's command played 
better ball during the last month than they did during the first, 
thereby upsetting all the calculations. 

Louisville -opened the season with what appeared to be fair 
prospects. Jimmy Burke's lack of success at Kansas City the 
year before had lost him many adherents, but he assembled a 
team to his liking, got it to playing an excellent system, and the 
Colonels unquestionably deserved to be the runners-up. Burke was 
liked by his men, was royally supported at home, and the team 
had its heart in the play. It was a toss-up between the Colonels 
and Indians until the last week of play, when Indianapolis won 
out by laying down bunts and breaking up Burke's hit-and-run 
play. There was hardly anything to choose between the pitching 
staffs of the two teams, and it remained for the final battles to 
be fought out on their merits. 

It was Clymer's ambition to win his fourth consecutive pen- 
nant, but the strengthening of other teams and the inheritance 
of the bad luck that comes to every team in time eventually took 
him out of the race. He got away to a bad start, but by 
strengthening a little pulled up to almost even terms with the 
leaders. The effort was a grand one, but his pitching staff was 
hardly strong enough to stand the pace and his team fell off in 
its batting. The support accorded the Senators was very good, al- 
though not up to the marks of the previous pennant winning 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 151 

Armour had a formidable aggregation at Toledo, but the failure 
of bis pitching staff to do the good work of the other first division 
hurlers took him out of the hunt. He had the best hitting team 
in the league, the organization being weak only at first base, a 
position he did not get filled satisfactorily all year. The addition 
of Hickman late in the season made him^especailly dangerous, but 
his team was put out of the running in the last series with 
Indianapolis when it lost four straight games at Washington Park. 
Armour had some trouble with some of his players at this time 
and he was beaten out for third place by Columbus. 

Barry McCormick got an excellent start at Milwaukee. He was 
at or near the top for several weeks and the team was drawing 
immense crowds at home and on the road. He had some excellent 
pitchers and a lot of good hitters, but his men eventually lost 
their batting eyes and suffered a bad slump, from which they 
could not recover. This slump marked a great decrease in interest 
in what was shown to be one of the best Base Ball towns in the 
circuit with a winning team. 

Mike Cantillon had at the outset one of the best looking teams 
in the circuit. Almost every position was played by a man of 
proved ability, but they were late in getting into form and never 
acquired that team work that is necessary to make a great team. 
The Millers proved somewhat of a disappointment to their owners, 
but they always were a big attraction and played to some of the 
biggest crowds ever known in Indianapolis. 

Monte Cross made his initial appearance as a manager at 
Kansas City and although he inherited a team that looked much 
better than the Colonels at the outset, was unable to get a win- 
ning start. He could always give some team a close contest. 
Indeed some of the hardest games of the season were those which 
were participated in by the Blues, but he lost game after game 
by small scores. 

Tim Flood tried to make a good team out of green material at 
St. Paul and was not very successful. He gave way late in the 
season to Mike Kelley, who spent his time in getting his organi- 
zation in good shape for next year. The St. Paul infield was a 
source of worry all season and there were only two pitchers who 
showed winning form. 

Good umpiring contributed to the success of the season and 
there was almost an entire absence of hostile demonstrations on 
the different fields. Even where they had the biggest crowds and 
the games were the tightest, the deportment of the fans was ex- 
cellent. 

The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders in 
Batting and Fielding in the American Association in 1908, accord- 
ing to the official records, are given herewith. The complete 
official records are published in Spalding's Official Base Ball 
Record., for sale by all newsdealers, price 10 cents. 

STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 

Club. Ind. Louis. Col. Tol. Minn. Mil. K.C. St.P. W. PC. 

Indianapolis 16 14 • 11 11 13 13 14 92 .601 

Louisville 6 .. 12 14 15 13 14 14 88 .575 

Columbus 8 10 .. 12 12 11 14 19 86 .558 

Toledo 11 8 10 .. 13 12 11 16 81 .530> 

Minneapolis 11 6 10 9 .. 15 11 15 77 .500 

Milwaukee 9 9 11 10 8 .. 11 13 71 .461 

Kansas City 9 8 8 10 11 11 .. 13 70 .456 

St. Paul 7 8 3 6 7 8 9 .. 48 .316 

Lost 61 65 68 72 77 83 83 104 



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ft 2 



3 ^ f 5 \»«L 




1, Stanley; 2, Olson; 3, Durham; 4, Puttrnann; 5, Burke; 6, Halla : 
7, Pietz; 8, Harley; 9, Hughes; 10, Chabek; 11, Perrine; 12, Wood- 
ruff^ 13, Quinlan; 14, Sullivan; 15, Stovall. Royal Photo Co. 
' ' LOUISVILLE TEAM— AMERICAN ASSOCIATION. 




1, Steen; 2, Lister; 3, Nagle; 4, Abbott: 5, Wakefield; tj, Smoot; 7, 
Armour, Mgr. ; 8, Gillen; 9, McCarthy; 10, Barbeau; 11. Armbruster; 
12, Hinchman; 13. Hopkins; 14. Land; 15, West; 16, Eells; 17, 
Bushelman; 18, Quinn: 19, Sutthoff; 20, Asher. 

TOLEDO TEAM— AMERICAN ASSOCIATION. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



153 



CHAMPIONSHIP WINNERS IN PREVIOUS YEARS. 

1902— Indianapolis 682(1905 — Columbus 658 

1903— St. Paul 657 1906— Columbus 615 

1904— St. Paul 646 1907— Columbus 584 



INDIVIDUAL 
Name and Club. G. AB.R. H. SH.PC.i 



BATTING. 

Name and Club. G. AB.R. H. SH.PC. 



Hickman, Tol., 


47 181 26 


74 4 


.409 Goodwin, C.-K.C. 


, 34 108 14 33 3 


.306 


Landreth, Lou., 


16 53 6 


20 4 


.377 Congalton, Col., 


152 594 76 179 15 


.301 


Sievers, Ind., 


24 58 3 


20 3 


.345 Carr, Ind., 


133 522 56 157 22 


.301 


Grabam, Min., 


20 39 10 


13 .. 


.333Smoot, Tol., 


131 501 66 151 17 


.301 


Abbott, Tol., 


79 272 36 


90 13 


.331Brashear, K.C., 


156 555 73 164 25 


.295 


Hayden, Ind., 


154 588 86 186 24 


.316 J. Meyers, St.P., 


88 329 45 96 7 


.292 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 
FIRST BASEMEN. 
Name and Club. G. P.O. A. E. PC.I Name and Club. 
Kibm, Col., 154 1649 68 11 .994 Beckley, K.C., 

S. Sullivan, Lou., 116 1206 69 12 .99l|Carr, Ind., 



G. P.O. 


A. 


E. 


PC. 


136 1432 
133 1409 


87 
121 


15 
16 


.990 
.990 



SECOND BASEMEN. 
O. Williams, I., 141 345 484 21 .9751 Wrigler, Col., 
McCormick, Mil., 154 312 401 21 .97l|Lindsay, Ind., 



155 361 465 26 .969 
18 41 67 4 .964 



THIRD BASEMEN. 



Friel, Col.. 
Hopke, Ind., 


150 
155 


206 
152 


308 

349 


33 .940rSmith, Min., 
33 .938|Elwert, Tol., 

SHORTSTOPS. 


86 
96 


108 
113 


178 

197 


22 
24 


.929 
.928 


Cross, K.C., 
Quinlan, Lou., 


146 
150 


307 
315 


504 

441 


46 .946!Bush, Ind., 
50 .9380yler, Min., 

OUTFIELDERS. 


153 

116 


330 
285 


472 
351 


54 
47 


.937 
.931 


Hill. K.C., 
Odwell, Col., 


23 
143 


30 
325 


4 

28 


1.000 Hickman, Tol., 
4 .989|Woodruff, Lou., 

PITCHERS. 


46 
130 


79 
245 


4 
38 


2 
6 


.988 
.979 


Essick.K.C.-St.P. 
Egan, K.C., 


34 
23 


13 
16 


76 
76 


1 .989!L. Durham, In.-L 
1 .989Upp, Col., 

CATCHERS. 


35 
15 


21 
14 


65 

30 


1 
1 


.986 
.978 


Pietz, Lou. 
Roth, Mil. 


73 
75 


307 
326 


S3 
97 


3 .992[Livingston, Ind., 
8 .981! J. Sullivan, K.C., 


118 

90 


581 
394 


143 

135 


15 
13 


.980 
.976 








PITCHERS' RECORDS. 












Name and Club. 




W. 


L. PC. 


Name and Club. 




w. 


L. 


PC. 


L. Durham, Ind.- 
Pape, Mil., 


Lou., 


19 
13 




7 .731 
5 .722 


Hess, Col., 
Puttmann, Lou., 




9 
26 


4 
12 




.692 
.684 



PITCHERS' ANALYSIS. 

^Opponents— ^ 

Name and Club. G. LP. AB. H. R. HB. BB. SO. WP.W.L. 

Taylor, Columbus 38 245 903 242 101 7 79 71 1 18 14 

Goodwin, Col. -Kan City 34 248 919 259 103 8 77 77 7 13 If 

Geyer, Columbus 44 342 1171 289 103 7 119 145 3 20 20 

Hall, Columbus-St. Paul 39 243 904 245 154 8 122 115 4 8 21 



tH % ft 

113- ' ' * »! 




1, Wheeler; 2, Buelow; 3, Olmstead; 4, Smith; 5, Oyler; 6, Byers; 

7, Block; 8, Cantillon, Mgr.; 9, Quillen; 10, O'Neil; 11. Clarke, Capt.; 

12, Kerwin; 13, Fiene. Copyright, 190S, by Luxton. 

MINNEAPOLIS TEAM— AMERICAN ASSOCIATION. 



i 




f. 


j 


1 * c '^* '^IR ' 

1 "mLM / i W 1 ^^ 


! 


■^faf^V.", 


!} 




i ,3 ' -i^J ! 



1, Robinson; 2, Beville; 3, McCormick; 4, Brown; 5. Bateman; 6, 
Dougherty; 7, Sehneiberg: 8, Pape; 9, Flynn: 10. Hoeffler; 11, Roth, 
12, Manske: 13, McChesney; 14, Randall; 15, Curtis. 

MILWAUKEE TEAM-AMERICAN ASSOCIATION. 




1, Sullivan; 2, Brashear: 3. Hill; 4, CrisD; 5, Goodwin; 6, Carter; 7, 
Hallman: 8, Downey; 9, Carlisle: 10, Swan; 11, Brandon; 12, Beck- 
ley; 13, Cross; 14, Brown; 15, Egan. 

KANSAS CITY TEAM— AMERICAN ASSOCIATION. * 




1, George T. Stallinjrs, President Newark: 2. J. J. McCaffery. Presi- 
dent Toronto: 3. John Dunn. Manager Baltimore: 4. Edward Holly. 
Manager Rochester: 5. Eugene McCann, Manager Jersey City: 6. 
L. Schafly, Manager Toronto; 7. Hugh Duffy. Manager Providence: 
8. George A. Smith, Manager Buffalo; 9, James Casey, Manager 
Montreal. 

A GROUP OF EASTERN LEAGUE CLUB OFFICIALS. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 157 

Eastern League 

By J. M. Cummings, Baltimore, Md. 

A new era dawns for the Eastern League at the beginning of 
this, its eighteenth season. Only "a little lower than the angels," 
as represented by the two major leagues, headed by a president 
who has shown in the past few months as never before that the 
bigger the job the bigger his ability to lead becomes, this new era 
bids fair to develop into the stepping stone to even greater things, 
and it need not surprise if, in the natural evolution of things, the 
Eastern League does not furnish its quota in the course of a few 
years toward the third major league so long talked of, and for 
which the Base Ball population of the country is rapidly grow- 
ing ripe. 

Few besides those in daily contact with Eastern League teams 
day in and day out during the playing season realize the high 
standard the organization has attained. The pitching is only a 
little less clever than that in either of the two major leagues 
and in one respect it compares more favorably, for the pitching 
staffs of the eight Eastern League clubs are nearer equal than 
of the eight clubs of either the National or the American League. 
Again, there is less difference in the ability of the pitchers who 
make up each Eastern League club's staff than in those of the 
majors. The fielding is generally remarkably fast and accurate. 
The base-running is both fast and heady. Tlie batting, as a rule, 
while possibly not quite as heavy as that of the majors, is vastly 
more heady than a couple of years ago. The time has passed — 
in the Eastern League at least — when the badge of the minor 
leaguer was his inability to "wait" while at the bat. The team 
work shown in the Eastern League, especially by those clubs that 
rise to the top of the standing from year to year, has developed 
materially for some seasons past until Eastern League games 
are a pleasure to the most critical observers of the great National 
Game. 

And why shouldn't Eastern Lesgue Base Ball be almost on a 
par with that of the major leagues? When it comes to importance 
of cities forming the circuit, the Eastern League undoubtedly ranks 
third, as is shown by the following population figures : 

Population. Population. 

Baltimore 650,000 Jersey City 232,699 

Buffalo 376,618 Toronto (Canada) 208,040 

Newark 283,289 Providence 198,635 

Montreal (Canada) 267,730 Rochester 181,672 

The foregoing cities represent a combined circuit population of 
2,398,683, and the majority of the figures are taken from a census 
of nine years ago. So it is eminently fitting that the Eastern 
League should have just been allowed by that eminent supreme 
council of all Base Ball, the National Commission, to occupy, along 
with the American Association and the Pacific Coast League, the 
only other organizations in minor Base Ball at all commensurate in 
importance with the Eastern, a classification of "AA" with which 
to begin the new year. Along with this elevation go privileges 
which will enable the Eastern League, as well as its comrades in 
merit and good fortune, to properly expand in all departments. 
Truly, it is a new era that is opening. 

Wise leadership is needed by big organizations, and the Eastern 
League is fortunate in having' P. T. Powers at its head. With the 
exception of one year, the Eastern League has continuously elected 




1, Barry; 2, Cronin; 3, Frock; 4, Sline; 5, Phelan; 6, Donahue; 7, 

Abstein; 8, Ostdiek; 9, Peterson; 10, Arndt; 11, Glaze; 12, McHale; 

13, Rock; 14, Duffy; 15, Hoffman; 16, Barrett. General Photo Co. 

PROVIDENCE TEAM— EASTERN LEAGUE. 




1, Brockett; 2, Newton; 3, Mueller; 4, Frill; 5, Hughes; 6, Kritchell; 
7, Mullin; 8, Sharpe; 9, Geo. T. Stallings, Mgr. ; 10, Mahling; 11, 
Engle; 12, Kelly; 13, Stanage; 14, DeVore; 15, Demmitt; 16. Philbin; 
17, Beecher. Copyright, 1908, by H. C. Weasner, Buffalo, N. Y. 

MEWARK TEAM— EASTERN LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GDIDB. 159 

President Powers to that office for a long period. During that time 
he has served it faithfully. Unsparing of his financial resources 
when money was needed in the darker days, blessed with a tempera- 
ment that usually succeeds in harmonizing diverse elements, the 
fact that the Eastern League is what it is to-day is proof that 
P. T. Powers has ruled wisely and well. 

But even the best leader:;- are sometimes powerless if unsup- 
ported, and it is to the credit of the Eastern League that it can 
boast as sturdy a set of club owners as any league, big or little. 
Unselfishness, great love for the Eastern League as an organization 
and ambition, backed by the determination to pour all of their 
resources into plans for furthering the interests of the league, are 
the characteristics of the men now banded together under its flag — 
and with such men, much can be accomplished. 

As in the other leagues, the Eastern has gravitated for the past 
few years toward playing managers and will begin the approaching 
season with practically every club under the advice of a man in 
the game. The Eastern League has already developed such mana- 
gers for the higher ranks as Jennings, Murray and Stallings, but 
that there are others has also been demonstrated and will continue 
to be in the future. Here in Baltimore we have "Jack" Dunn, 
who has captured two Eastern League pennants in three years and 
expects more. Toronto will Lave a Baltimore man in '"Joe" Kelley, 
who won a pennant for that city in 1907, the only previous year 
of his connection with the Eastern League. Jersey City will con- 
tinue in the hands of ''Gene'' McCann, another Baltimore boy, who 
showed remarkable ability in bettering the fortunes of the Jersey- 
men after taking hold of them late last season. Buffalo will con- 
tinue with George Smith, an able man, used to his job. Rochester 
is to try John Ganzel. late of Cincinnati. Montreal will again be 
under the guidance of "Jimmy" Casey, who showed plainly last 
season that he has the managerial knack. Wolverton will replace 
Stallings at Newark and Providence will remain under the rule of 
Hugh Duffy, who is the owner also. 

On the whole, the pre-season outlook of a league was never 
better than the Eastern can show at present, and of this big and 
rapidly growing bigger organization the Baltimore team — "Orioles," 
as they have been known for years — has the honor to be champion. 
Entering the Eastern League in lOOo, after a series of body blows 
administered first by the National and later by the American 
League. Baltimore did not take kindly for some little time to the 
idea of minor league ball. It only needed a season or two, how- 
ever, to convince even those who had had the advantage of sitting 
at the feet of the old pennant-winning Orioles of 1894, 1895 and 
1896 — the greatest Base Ball team ever put together — that there 
was not sufficient difference even five years ago between big league 
and Eastern League ball to worry about. They saw that it 
required almost as high a standard of play and that it was just 
as difficult to win games and pennants as in the old, palmy days. 
So one by one the old-timers buried their soreness and joined the 
new crops of younger rooters the passing years produced. Jennings 
returned to the city that years ago made him famous, and for 
four years he endeavored to land an Eastern League champions!) ip. 
He almost succeeded, time and again, but never quite. ••Jack" 
Dunn, medaled by the victory of his Providence team in 1905, 
succeeded Jennings in 1907, and it took him one whole year to 
reorganize the team and to land Baltimore's first flag since thirteen 
years before. The president of the club. Edward Ilanlon. is too 
experienced a manager himself to interfere as an owner with his 
manager, and he let it be understood from the start that he 
intended to keep hands off. 




1, MalarKey; 2, McConnell; 3, Tozer; 4, Knapp; 5, Kisinger; 6, Mil- 
ligan; 7, Vowinkle; 8, McAllister; 9, Clancy; 10, Hill; 11, Geo. 
Smith, Mgr.; 12, Nattress; 13, Keister; 14, Archer; 15, White; 16, 
Schirm; 17, Murray; 18, Ryan. Copyright, 1908, by H. C. Weasner, 
BUFFALO TEAM— EASTERN LEAGUE. 




1, Wicker; 2. Cleary; 3, Jones: 4. Stanley; 5, Keefe; 6, Corcoran; 
7, Dr. J. Casey, Mgr.; 8, Louden; 9, Gardiner; 10, Evans; 11, Joyce; 
12, O'Neil; 13^, Needham; 14, Clark; 15, Jones; 16, Ball. 
MONTREAL TEAM— EASTERN LEAGUE. 

Photo by H. C. Weasner, Buffalo, N. Y. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 161 

The Oriole leader came up to expectations. He had a fine team, 
but he kept that team together and got out of it the full limit 
of its individual and collective capabilities. He himself blazed the 
trail. He perfected and put into execution the squeeze play last 
season as it had never before been done in Baltimore, and to that 
one play the Orioles can attribute at least a dozen victories, for it 
brought in the one run near the end, either needed to tie and so 
win eventually, or to win outright. 

He had an able lieutenant in "Jack" Knight, who developed into 
such a brilliant shortshop that Baltimoreans ceased for the nonce 
talking about "When Jennings was in his prime." But one thing 
more was needed to round out the Orioles into a real championship 
team — the advent of the veteran "Pete" Cassidy. Up to the time 
of his appearance in Oriole uniform, the Birds had usually played 
great ball at home, only to grow "dead" on the road. So marked 
was this reversal of form that Baltimore began to be known as a 
"bad on-the-road-team." Cassidy supplied the life, the ginger and 
the "plugging" spirit away from home as well as at home, and all 
diamonds began to look alike to the Birds from then on. 

But the mention of these names first must not detract from the 
tribute all of the other players on the team fairly earned. All 
had their part, and performed it well. In Adkins, McCloskey, 
Hardy, Dessau, Pearson and Schmidt, the team was favored with 
an expert corps of pitchers that fully measured up to the high 
standard already spoken of as pervading the entire league. They 
even excelled the others in some degrees. In Byers, Hearne and the 
veteran Wilbert Robinson, the Orioles had the advantage of the 
finest trio of catchers to be found in the Eastern or any other 
minor league. "Sammy" Strang Nicklin was of great service to 
the club, either in the infield or the outfield, wherever he might 
be needed most. "Bob" Hall never played so brilliantly in his 
entire Base Ball career, and his work at third base was a continu- 
ous pleasure. In the outfield the club had the services during the 
season of William O'Hara, Chester Chadbourne, John Kelly, Ray 
Demmitt and Pfeffer. O'Hara was the only one of the lot to play 
from end to end, for Chadbourne was in ill-health and couldn't do 
himself justice, while Kelly and Demmitt were transferred to 
Newark in mid-season. Their loss was offset by the addition of 
Pfeffer, who, though signed as a pitcher, soon showed himself to 
be a valuable outfielder. As for O'Hara, his worth to the team 
cannot begin to be expressed by records, though they show him to 
be the champion base-stealer, a clever fielder and a batter well up 
to the .300 mark. 

The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders in 
Batting and Fielding in the Eastern League in 1908, accord- 
ing to the official records, are given herewith. The complete 
official records are published in Spalding's Official Base Ball 
Record., for sale by all newsdealers, price 10 cents. 

STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 

Club. Bait. Prov.New. Buf. Mon.Tor. J.C. Roch. W. PC. 

Baltimore 9 8 11 15 12 14 14 83 .593 

Providence 11 •• 13 9 12 12 11 11 79 .581 

Newark 12 6 .. 13 12 11 13 12 79 .577 

Buffalo 9 11 7 .. 10 11 13 14 75 .536 

Montreal 5 6 8 10 .. 11 12 12 64 .461 

Toronto 8 8 7 9 10 .. 9 8 59 .428 

Jersey City 6 8 7 7 8 11 .. 11 58 .423 

Rochester 6 9 8 6 8 11 7 .. 55 .415 

Lost 57 57 58 65 75 79 79 82 552 




1, Moffitt; 2, Vandegrift; 3, Fhyle; 4, Weidensaul; 5, Applegate; 
6, Cockman; 7, Schafly, Mgr.; 8, J. J. McCaffery, Pres.; 9, Thos. W. 
Slattery, Sec; 10, Hickey; 11. Brown; 12, Pierce; 13, Whitnev; 14, 
McGinley; 15, Thielman: 16. Rudolph: 17. Mitchell: 18, Keenan. 
TORONTO TEAM— EASTERN LEAGUE. 




1, Mason; 2, Lafitte; 3. Youns:: 4, rfanniiller: 5. Moore: 6, Woods; 
7, Gastmeyer; 8. H. E. McCann, Mgr.; 9. Bean: 10, Manser: 11, 
Merritt; 12. DeGroff: 13. Clement: 14, Shaw: 15. Crist: 16. Fox: 17, 
Handford; 18, Fitzgerald. Photo bv H. C. Weasner, Buffalo, N. Y. 
JERSEY CITY TEAM— EASTERN LEAGUE. 




1, Snyder; 2, Flanagan; 3, Erwin; 4, Barger; 5, Anderson; 6. Henley; 
7, Hurler; 8, Lennox; 9, Loudenslager; 10. Minahan; 11, Batch: 12, 
G. Durbin, Mascot; 13, Duggleby; 14. Holly. Capt.-Mgr. ; 15, Bau- 
nister; 16, Butler: 17, A. Durbin, Mascot. 

ROCHESTER TEAM— EASTERN LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



163 



CHAMPIONSHIP WINNERS IN PREVIOUS YEARS. 

1S92— Providence (first series)... .616 190*3— Providence 623 

1S92— Binghamton (second series) .667 1901— Rochester 645 

1893— Erie 606 1902— Toronto .*669 

1S94— Providence 696 1903— Jersev Citv 736 

Springfield 6S7 1904— Buffalo 657 

1S96— Providence 602 1905— Providence ' *63S 

Syracuse 632 1906— Buffalo ' '607 

-Montreal 5S6 1907— Toronto 619 

-Rochester 626. 



Name and Club. 
Duffy. P., 
Poland, P., 
Jones. If., 
Pfeffer. Ba., 
Arndt, P., 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 
G. AB.R. H.SH.PC. Name and Club. 



37 37 10 19 2 

20 56 3 

135 517 67 160 13 

.3 59 11 

137 523 63 152 24 



.333 White. Bu., 
.311 Evans. M.. 
.309 DeVore, N., 
.30l|O'Neil, M., 
.295 



G. AB.R. H.SH.PC. 

137 457 59 135 29 .293 
141 510 85 149 16 .292 
140 51S 91 150 30 .290 
117 441 55 12S 15 .290 



Name and Club. G, 
McConnell. Bu., 12 
Kellev, T., 31 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 
FIRST BASEMEN. 
PO. A. E. PC, Name and Club. G. PO. A. 



E. PC. 



Ill 

333 



9 1000' Whitney, Bu.-T. 132 1359 89" 15 
20 3 .995.Sharpe, N., 128 1373 S6 15 



Schaflv. T., 
Woods. J.C., 



Brouthers. Ba 
Casey, M., 



Donahue. P., 
Holly, R., 



Kelly. Ba.-N., 
Weidensaul, T., 



Anderson. R., 
Gettman. T., 



Weidensaul. T., 
Needham, M. t 



Frill. N., 
Pearson, Ba., 



Robinson. Ba., 
Carrisch, N., 



SECOND BASEMEN. 
74 188 203 13 .968'Smith. Bu.. ' 
11 26 34 2 .965, Needham, M., 



120 244 319 21 
12 20 25 2 



.9S9 
.959 



.964 
.958 



16 

132 



18 
118 



THIRD BASEMEN. 
35 40 3 .962 Woods, J.C., 
175 267 25 .946, Strang, Ba., 

SHORTSTOPS. 
41 43 3 .966|Gastmeyer. J.C., 
248 416 38 .946|Nattress, Bu., 

LEFT FIELDERS. 

174 7 3 .9S4 White, Bu., 
126 5 3 .97S,DeGroff, J.C., 

CENTER FIELDERS. 

175 13 2 .989 DeGroff. J.C., 
169 10 3 .984. Caff yn. T., 

RIGHT FIELDERS. 
37 4 1.000 Phyle, T.. 
29 3 l.OOu Keister, Bu., 



26 31 
17 30 



.939 
.930 



19 36 57 6 .939 
124 260 350 46 .930 



135 258 

39 5S 



84 165 
35 SI 



PITCHERS. 
1.000 Moffitt. T.. 
1.000 Donahue. M., 



CATCHERS. 
25 3 .9831 Ball, M.. 

21 2 .981 1 Fitzgerald. J.C., 

PITCHERS' RECORDS. 



48 221 
60 297 



14 8 .971 
5 2 .969 



1 1.000 

2 1.000 



61 1.000 
35 1.000 



70 6 .9S0 
51 8 .978 



Name and Club. 
Schmitt, Baltimore 
Mueller, Newark .. 
Adkins. Baltimore 
Glaze, Providence . 



W. 



IP. 

73 
227 
326 
181 



r— Opp.— , 
H. R. HB. 



BB. SO. 



55 
187 
263 
136 



28 1 

80 17 

114 8 

49 2 



2: 

52 
75 
34 



23 

103 
139 
97 



PC. 

.838 
.720 
.707 
.70f 




1, Ferdinand E. Kuhn, President Nashville; 2, R. H. Baugh; Presi- 
dent Birmingham; 3. J. W. Heisman, President Atlanta; 4. F. P. 
Coleman, President Memphis; 5, R. C. Rather, President Littl* Rock; 
6, L. L. Stern, President New Orleans: 7. W. R. Joyner; Director 
Atlanta; 8, T. F. McCullough, Secretary-Treasurer Memphis. 

A GROUP OF SOUTHERN ASSOCIATION OFFICIALS. 




1, W. A. Smith, Manager Atlanta; 2, Charles Frank, Manager New 
Orleans; 3, William Bernhard, Manager Nashville; 4, Charles Babb, 
Manager Memphis; 5, M. J. Finn, Manager Little Rock; 6, Harry 
Hartwell, Director Mobile; 7, C. Molesworth, Manager Birmingham. 

A GROUP OF SOUTHERN ASSOCIATION MANAGERS. 



1 ■■.. .: 


H 








ri* H ^ 


nl 


'*> * ■ ** 


'l^' ?v ' 










^Ria^ j 


[LJBRara p gWja * 


Jl f^ 


% 


;^> ,fe 




Hl^l 





1, Ferd. E. Kuhn, Pres.; 2, Kellum; 3, Duggan; 4. Hardy; 5, Sitton; 
6, Wiseman; 7, Claude Davis. Sec.-Treas. : 8, Hunter; 9, Butler; 10, 
East; 11, ^Ym. Bernhard. Mgr.; 12, Daubert; 13, Seigle; 11, Bay; 
15, Perdue; 16, McElveen; 17, Seabaugh. 

NASHVILLE TEAM, CHAMPIONS SOUTHERN ASSOCIATION. 
Copyright, 1908, by W. G. and A. J. Thuss. 




1, Frank P. Coleman, Pres.; 2, T. F. McCullousrh. Sec.-Treas.; 3, 
O'Leary; 4, Owens; 5, Carey: 6. Keiber; 7. Garrity; 8, Shields; 9, 
Savidge; 10, Schwenck; 11, Willis; 12, Baerwald; 13, Cranston; 14, 
Lindsay; 15, Babb, Mgr.; 16, Donahou; 17. Carter. 

Bluff City Eng. Co., Photo. 
MEMPHIS TEAM— SOUTHERN ASSOCIATION. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 167 

Southern Association 

By Grantland Rice, Nashville, Tenn. 

The notable epidemic of close finishes which struck balldom in 
1908 played its part in the Southern campaign upon a par with 
that of the two big league windups. 

By the margin of one game — one point — one run — the pennant 
fight was decided at sunset upon the final day of battle, as close 
a. finish as the keenest mathematician could possibly figure out or 
the most ardent fanatic dream would ever come to pass. 

And to add to the general hilarity of the occasion, the flag 
battle at the close was left to the two clubs practically tied for 
the lead to settle this last argument between themselves, just as 
in the case of the Cub-Giant duel in the National race and the 
White Sox-Tiger melee in the American. 

Nashville and New Orleans arrived at the last series practically 
tieck-and-neck, and Nashville, for the third time in the history of 
the new Southern League, carried away the premiership under 
conditions which reflect more to the credit of Manager Bill Bern- 
hard than to any other manager upon Dixie's complete roster. 

When the campaign opened in April it was generally conceded 
by the dope route that the flag fluttered between New Orleans, 
Memphis or Atlanta. 

Montgomery and Mobile were the two dark horses, while it was 
generally conceded that Birmingham and Little Rock had not 
bolstered up sufficiently to finish one-two. Nashville, with the 
remnant of a tail-end club from the year before and a manager 
new to both leadership and the league, was of course counted 
quickly out by the colony of expertsl 

Early race conditions justified the winter and spring dope. 
Mobile started off with a gay rush, but soon slipped back. Mont- 
gomery forged out into the pace, but crumbled beneath the strain. 
New Orleans, Atlanta and Memphis forged out, and by late June 
there seemed to be no earthly show for any rival club to head off 
Charley Frank's veteran array from the Pelican City of the Gulf. 

All this while Nashville was neither in the hunt nor yet out 
of it. Taking things easy around fourth or fifth position, Bill 
Bernhard's Nashville contingent stuck to the chase almost un- 
noted until late July. Then the Volunteers, as the Nashville team 
was named, began to exhibit a few fresh signs of life and ac- 
tivity. Slowly, but as surely as Fate, the tail-enders of 1907 
began to move upward, playing even more consistently upon the 
road than at home. Time and again they were counted out 
after failing to improve their home stay, only to grimly swing on 
through long, hard road trips until the last quarter of the race 
was reached. 

By this time Birmingham, Little Rock and Atlanta had faltered 
and fallen to the rear — completely out of the hunt. Mobile was 
wobbling with only a faint look-in, while Montgomery, beginning 
to recover from a disastrous mid-season slump, was again coming 
fast under the management of big Ed Greminger, who was making 
good with a rush. 

As the leaders swung out into the final stretch, New Orleans 
av;d Nashville were the big flag favorites, with Memphis conceded 
a >cood chance, and Montgomery still hanging on. In the pre- 
liminary battling wlvich then took place, New Orleans wrecked 
$Iontgomery*s Inst hope, while Nashville spiked Memphis' sunset 
gun to a finish. It was then Nashville and New Orleans, both 
clubs bowling over all rivals in the last rush by combined game- 




1, Matthews; 2, Clark; 3, Brazelle; 4, Rohe; 5, Bartley; 6, Dexter; 
\ 7, Stratton; 8, Lord; 9, Breitenstein; 10, Nill; 11, Manning; 12, 
Rickert; 13, Huber; 14, Dundon; 15, Fritz. 

NEW ORLEANS TEAM— SOUTHERN ASSOCIATION. 




1, Reagan; 2, Shannon; 3, Bliss; 4, Guese; 5, Persons; 6, Thomas; 
7, Hart; 8, Perry; 9, McCafferty; 10, Greminger, Mgr. ; 11, Juul; 12, 
Hopkins; 13, Pepe; 14. Rockenfield: 15, G reminder, Jr., Mascot. 
MONTGOMERY TEAM, SOUTHERN ASSOCIATION. 

Coleman, Photo. 




1, Watson; 2, Fisher, Mgr.; 3, Massing; 4, Sabrie; 5, Becker: 6, 
Wheat; 7, Hixon; 8. Hickman: 9, Benson: 10, Garvin; 11, Thornton; 
12, Sentelle; 13, Killian; 14, Daley; 15, James. 

MOBILE TEAM— SOUTHERN ASSOCIATION. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 169 

ness, speed and better all-around Base Ball, playing the game 
jam up in every department, without a let-up through a gruelling 
period of hard battling. The last and deciding series found them 
face to face, New Orleans half a game in the lead but fighting on 
Nashville soil. This meagre margin meant that the winning club 
must win two games of the series. Frank's team, with Bill 
Bartley facing Manager Bernhard, won the opening contest, but 
they were all even, practically, at the end of the second day's 
fighting when Johnny Duggan, for Nashville, downed Silver Bill 
Phillips. 

The ball park was crowded to its utmost capacity on the final 
day when young Vedder Sitton, just out of the South Atlantic, 
was called upon to meet the veteran Theodore Breiten stein, who 
was just finishing the most remarkable year he had ever known 
in the league. 

For six innings neither team could score, so effective was the 
pitching and the defensive play of both teams, but with two out 
in the seventh and the weak end of the Nashville batting list up, 
the unexpected happened, and scratch singles in a row put over 
the only run. Sitton stuck to the end, developing power as the 
game progressed and winning a deserved b \ttle in which McEl- 
veen, Wiseman and others starred with effect. 

The league was well managed in every way, Bernhard of Nash- 
ville and Fisher of Mobile especially deserving great credit for 
the ranking of their teams. Taken as a whole, there were fewer 
accidents and injuries than before and fewer individually brilliant 
stars. The latter list would include only Criss Speaker of Little 
Rock, Briscoe Lord of New Orleans, and - but one or two others. 

The strength of the league was in the box. There were any 
number or high grade slabmen, the list including among others 
Breitenstein of New Orleans, Savige and Chappelle of Memphis, 
Castleton and Ford of Atlanta, Hickman and Fisher of . Mobile, 
Sitton and Duggan of Nashville, with Perdue, Bernhard and 
Kellum close behind ; Thomas of Montgomery, Buchanan of Little 
Rock, and others. 

While, however, there was a notable lack of individual bril- 
liancy, there was an equally notable improvement in general all- 
around team play and better balanced management, all of which 
brought out the largest total attendance in the history of the 
organization, which under President William Kavanaugh's excel- 
lent leadership has been coming forward consistently every season. 

The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders in 
Batting and Fielding in the Southern Association in 1908, accord- 
ing to the official records, are given herewith. The complete 
official records are published in Spalding's Official Base Ball 
Record., for sale by all newsdealers, price 10 cents. 



STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 

Club. Nash. N.O. Mem. Mon. Mob. Atla. L.R. Bir. Won. PC. 

Nashville 10 11 9 12 13 10 10 75 .573 

New Orleans 8 .. 7 11 8 11 13 18 76 .571 

Memphis 8 11 .. 10 12 10 9 13 73 .540 

Montgomery 10 8 9 .. 7 10 12 12 68 .511 

Mobile 6 11 9 11 .. 12 9 9 67 .500 

Atlanta 6 8 9 10 7 .. 12 11 63 .467 

Little Rock 9 7 10 8 11 8 .. 9 62 .449 

Birmingham 9 2 7 6 10 8 11 .. 53 .393 

Lost 56 57 62 65 67 72 76 82 




1, Sanderr; 2, Coveney; 3, Johns; 4, Castro; 5, Walsh; 6, Castleton; 
7, Philbin; 8, McKenzie; 9. Atkins; 10, Schopp; 11, Viebahn; 12, 
Sittcn; 13, McDonald; 14, Cumming; 15, Becker; 16, Manning: 17, 
Shea; 18, Jordan; 19, Fox; 20, Smith, Mgr.; 21, Moran; 22. MeMur- 
ray; 23, Collins; 24, Wilks. Nelson, Photo. 

ATLANTA TEAM— SOUTHERN ASSOCIATION. 




1, Hart; 2, Northern; 3, Eyler; 4. Buchanan; 5. Finn, Mgr.: 0, 
Hess; 7, Collins; 8, Wood: 9. Keith; 10, Wells; 11, Griffin; 12, Helm; 
13, Speaker, 14, Page; 15, Connors. 

LITTLE ROCK TEAM— SOUTHERN ASSOCIATION. 




Molesworth; 2. Robitaille: 3. Henline: 4, Bauer: 5. Larsen: 6, 
Turier 7 Downer; S. Raub: 9. Flebarty: 10. Walters; 11, Doug- 
lass; 12, Robinson; 13. Meek; 14, Ford; 15, Smith. 

BIRMINGHAM TEAM— SOUTHERN ASSOCIATION. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



171 



CHAMPIONSHIP WINNERS IN PREVIOUS YEARS. 

1901— Nashville 634 1905— New Orleans 651 

1902— Nashville 658 1906— Birmingham 652 

1903— Memphis 584 1907— Atlanta 591 

1904— Memphis 600 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 
Name and Club. G. AB. R. 1B.SH.PC; Name and Club. 
eaker, L.R., 127 47181165 16 .350 Henline. B.-Mon. 



Lord, N.O.. 

Seeker, L.R.. 
olesworth, Bir. 



119 461 67 145 13 
53 187 22 57 15 
125 453 48 137 19 



.314 Winters, Atla., 
.304 Bliss, Mont., 



G. AB. R. 1B.SH.PC. 

144 539 62 163 18 .302 
80 292 28 88 16 .301 
43 155 18 46 2 .296 



Name and Club. 
Cary, Memphis, 
Fox, Atla., 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 

FIRST BASEMEN. 

G. PO. A. E. PC Name and Club. 

117 1282 93 10 .992 Greminger. Mont., 

138 1233 125 13 .990Douglas, Bir., 



G. PO. A. E. PC. 

62 650 33 7 .989 
122 1230 65 15 .988 



SECOND BASEMEN. 
Dundon, N.O.,. 125 344 335 20 .971|Walters, Bir., 

Jordan, Atla., 138 456 301 24 .969|James, Mobile, 



102 231 260 18 .964 
137 3b8 393 29 .961 



THIRD BASEMEN. 
McElveen, Nash., 132 ISO 287 24 .951 Hess, Little Rock, 
Cross, New Or., 15 24 27 3 .944, Rohe, New Orleans, 



120 187 267 29 .939 
122 152 229 25 .935 



Griffin, Little R., 
If ill, New Or., 



SHORTSTOPS. 

27 47 2 .975 Butler. Nashville, 
69 103 14 .95i;Sentelle, Mobile, 



81 177 246 27 .940 
123 260 397 42 .939 



OUTFIELDERS. 
.Wilkes, Atlanta, 29 54 5 1000' Jolly. Memphis. 15 24 10 1000 

Wheat, Mobile, 24 42 3 1000,Borthern, Little R., 17 29 10 1000 



Bliss. Montgomery* 
^Gaskill, Mobile, 



Hurlburt. Atl.-Nash. 
Garvin, Mobile, 



Name and Club. 
Breltenstein. New O. 
Thomas, Mont., 



PITCHERS. 
13 2 54 1000'Flehartv, Bir., 
13 4 28 lOOO.Breitenstein, New O., 



CATCHERS. 

46 235 44 3 .989|Raub, Birmingham, 
83 308 95 9 . 978 1 Wood, Little Rock, 



PITCHERS' RECORDS. 
G. W. L. T. PC. | Name and Club. 
24 17 6 1 .739 Castleton. Atlanta, 
30 19 9 2 .671 Savidge, Memphis, 



12 3 31 
27 14 98 1 


1000 
.991 


78 373 83 9 
96 384 130 12 


.978 
.977 


G. W. L. T. 


PC. 


16 10 5 1 
32 20 11 1 


.666 
.645 




1, Chas. W. Boyer, President South Atlantic League; 2. J. II. 
Farrell, President New York State League; 3, M. H. Sexton, Presi- 
dent Indiana-Illinois-Iowa League; 4, Dr. F. R. Carson, President 
Central League; 5, Chas. F. Carpenter, President Tri-State League; 
6, D. M. Shively, President Western Association and Oklahoma and 
Kansas League; 7. W. H. Lucas, President Northwestern League; 8, 
Jake Wells, President Virginia League. 

A GROUP OF MINOR LEAGUE PRESIDENTS. 




1, J. H. Wearn, President Carolina Association; 2, Joseph S. Jackson. 
President South Michigan League; 3, James D. Gronninger, President 
Pennsylvania and West Virginia League; 4, A. E. Blain, President 
Illinois-Missouri League; 5, Robert Quinn, President Ohio State 
League; 6, A. C. Crowder, President Cotton States League; 7, W. 
Robbie, President Texas League; 8, Charles H. Morton, President 
Ohio and Pennsylvania League. 

A GROUP OF MINOR LEAGUE PRESIDENTS. 




1, Townsend; 2, Britton; 3, Wolverton: 4, Shean; 5, Cockill; 6, 
O'Hara; 7, Foster; 8, Flater; 9, Warhop; 10, Stansbury; 11, Cree; 12, 
Lowry: ]3, Hennessey. 

WILLIAMSPORT TEAM, CHAMPIONS TRI-STATE LEAGUE. 




1, Egan; 2, Huelsman; 3, Hoch; 4, Selbach; 5, Krause; 6, Gordon; 

7, McGilvray; 8, Calhoun; 9, Litschi; 10, Zimmerman; 11, Knotts; 

12, F. Smith; 13, Pounds; 14, J. Smith; 15, Geo. W. Heckert, Mgr. 

HARRISBURG TEAM— TRI-STATE LEAGUE. 




1, Hemphill; 2, Deal; 3, Marshall; 4, Odell; 5, Hafford; & Fltzpat- 
rick; 7, Coveleskie; 8, Moser; 9, Newton; 10, Foster, Mgr.; 11, F. B. 
Trout, Pres.; 12, Grady; 13, Rementer. 

LANCASTER TEAM— TRI-STATE LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 175 

Tri-State league 

By W. P. Clarke, Williamsport, Pa. 

The Tri-State League race of 1908 proved one of the most exciting: 
in the history of a league which was born in exciting times and has 
known nothing but excitement during the five years of its existence. 
Williamsport won the championship for the third time, though 
Harrisburg pressed hard in the closing days of the campaign. 
1 The Tri-State, which had accumulated many excellent players 
during its "outlaw" days, paid the full penalty at the close of its 
first year under protection and when its managers looked over their 
nucleus for 1908 it was very discouraging. The major leagues had 
completely riddled them. Williamsport found; itself in possession of 
only a third baseman and one outfielder, all other members of the 
championship team having been sold or drafted. With this small 
foundation Manager Wolverton gathered together and built up the 
champions of 1908. 

Probably the best idea of the caliber of Base Ball the Tri-State 
cities have been seeing can be gained by a careful study of the major 
league ranks. The reserve lists of the National and American 
Leagues alone at the close of the 1908 season contained the names 
of a sufficient number of players who have worn Tri-State uniforms 
to make an eight-club league. 

In the opening weeks of the 1908 contest Williamsport, Harris- 
burg, Lancaster, Johnstown and Altoona held the lead at various 
times, the latter for one day and Johnstown for two days. Williams- 
port finally took the lead on July 6 and was never headed for the 
remainder of the season. The champions played the most consistent 
ball of any of the teams. 

Harrisburg played a strong but uneven game, doing its best work 
in the last two months of the season when it made a great spurt 
and a strong effort to land the pennant, and nearly succeeded. Lan- 
caster again landed in third place. Its game was a repetition of 
former years, when the team started off with a rush then wavered 
and finally fell back. Reading and Johnstown fought hard for 
fourth place, both playing a strong game at times and falling off 
at other times. The sale of pitcher Kroh in the closing weeks of 
the season cost* Johnstown the place. Trenton, Altoona and Wil- 
I mington never showed anything like championship form at any 
stage after the month of May. 

The 1908 season was not a success from a financial standpoint. 
With the salary limit which had been established it was expected 
that all the teams would be money makers, but the business depres- 
sion, added to the usual Presidential year slump, caused a falling 
I off in attendance. A salary limit of $2,300 per month has been 
* adopted for 1909. 

May 6 and 7 occupy a peculiar place in Tri-State history because 
on those two days in both 1907 and 1908 all games were postponed 
by rain. 

On September 11, m the Williamsport-Altoona game, Altoona 
made 28 base hits and Williamsport 27, a total of 75 safe hits. 
This is the Tri-State record. This was batters' day all over the 
circuit. In the four games played 130 safe hits were made, an 
average for the eight teams of sixteen each. 

The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders in 
Batting and Fielding in the Tri-State League in 1908, accord- 
ing to the official records, are given herewith. The complete 
official records are published in Spalding's Official Base Ball 
Record, for sale by all newsdealers, price 10 cents. 




I, Stroh; 2, Crook; 3, Weigand, Mgr.; 4, Clay; 5, Lelivelt; 6, Baker; 
7, Shaughnessy; 8, Lynch; 9, Jacob L. Weitzel, Owner; 10, Barthold; 

II, Toice; 12, Emerson; 13, Fox; 14, Barton; 15, Jackson. Goldman 

READING TEAM— TRI-STATE LEAGUE. Photo. 




1, Mathews; 2, Hoey; 3, Cannel; 4, Myers; 5, Knowles; 6, Brouthers; 
7, Carney; 8, Murray; 9, Moran; 10, Stem; 11, Marhefkar 12, Magoon; 
13, McCarthy; 14, Mattern. 

TRENTON TEAM— TRI-ST ATE LEAGUE. 




1, Glassburner; 2, Keller: 3, Yerkes: 4, Ward: 5, Frambes: 6, 
McKinney; 7, O'Neil; 8, Shields; 9, Holmes; 10, Farrell, Mgr.; 11, 
Lee; 12, Reisling: 13, Deininger. 

ALTOONA TEAM— TRI-STATE LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



177 



STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 



Club. 


Won. Lost. 


PC. 


Club. 


Won. Lost. 


PC. 


Williamsport .. 


82 45 


.646 


Johnstown 


64 63 


.504 


Harrisburg .... 


80 47 


.630 


Trenton 


54 73 


.425 


Lancaster 


72 55 

67 60 


.567 
.527 


Altoona 


49 78 


.386 


Reading 

CHAM 


Wi 1 m inert rm .... 


40 87 


.315 


PIONSHIP WINNERS IN PREVIOUS YEARS. 




1904— York 




.606 
_fi29 


1906— York 




.591 


1905 — Williamsport 


1 Q07 — Wil 1 in m snort 


.694 




INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 






Name and Club 


G.AB.R. H. SH.PC. 


Name and Club 


G.AB.R. H. SH.PC. 


Gordon, Harris., 


20 71 12 28 3 


.394 


Marshall, Lan., 


112 428 80 130 9 


.304 


Wolverton, Wm. 


125 427 61 149 21 


.349 


Conn, Johns., 


123 444 60 134 8 


.302 


Huelsman, Har., 


128 452 84 153 11 


.338 


Baker, Read., 


119 451 65 135 15 


.299 


Cree, Wmspt., 


90 322 69 107 18 


.332 


Caffyn, Tren., 


24 84 8 25 4 


.298 


Deininger, Alt., 


114 430 70 142 7 


.330 


Hennessey , Wms, 


127 433 55 129 28 


.298 


Ward, Alt., 


115 427 50 137 20 


.321 


Hartley, Alt-Wn. 


107 416 30 123 10 


.296 


McGilvray, Har., 


74 255 39 81 14 


.318 


Johnson, Johns., 


112 416 52 123 8 


.296 


C. Foster, Lan., 


119 440 74 139 9 


.316 


Moran, Tren., 


97 342 45 101 7 


.295 


Flater, Wmspt., 


52 128 15 40 6 


.313 


Selbach, Harris., 


85 306 35 90 12 


.294 


Clay, Read., 


126 444 70 138 11 


.311 


Drake, Johns., 


47 158 13 46 10 


.291 


Lelivelt, Read., 


124 462 59 141 12 


.305 


Cockill, Wmspt., 


126 482 68 140 7 


.290 



Name and Club. 
Calhoun, Harris, 
Grady, Wgn.-Lan., 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 
FIRST BASEMEN. 



G. PO. A. E. PC. 

128 1317 105 13 .997 
. 17 177 18 2 .990 



Name and Club. 
Cockill, Wmspt., 
Deal, Lan., 



G. PO. A. E. PC. 

126 1114 155 14 .989 

127 1193 93 14 .989 



Magoon, Tren., 
Marhefka, Wn.-Tr., 



Gleason, Wn.-Tren., 
Zimmerman, Alt., 



Lynch, Wn.-Read., 
Ward, Alt., 



Barthold, Read., 
Barton, Read., 



Barthold, Read., 
Hoch, Wilgn.-Har., 



Grady, Wn.-Lan., 

Koepmann, Johns., 



Name and Club. 
Krause, Harris., 
Warhop, Wmspt., 



SECOND BASEMEN. 

100 264 288 20 .9831 Egan, Harris., 
18 33 58 2 .978|Conn, Johns., 

THIRD BASEMEN. 

15 17 42 1 .983|Baker, Read., 
128 150 282 27 .941|Strobel, Tren., 

SHORTSTOPS. 

120 234 457 29 .960 1 Newton, Lan., 
103 213 337 28 .952[Litschi, Harris., 

OUTFIELDERS. 



128 330 395 20 .973 
66 162 185 10 .972, 



119 174 246 27 .939 
44 55 93 10 .937 



127 281 387 38 .946 

128 288 415 43 .942 



43 
15 


27 
33 


2 

2 


lOOOiZollers, Wilgn., 
1000 1 Selbach, Harris., 

PITCHERS. 


79 171 17 1 
85 136 8 1 


.995 

.993 


27 
37 


12 
12 


51 

70 


lOOOJMyers, Rd.-Har.-Tr. 

1 .988|Mattern, Tren., 

CATCHERS. 


38 23 65 1 

49 15 127 2 


.988 
.986 


5S 
68 


260 
386 


69 

89 


3 .990|Rementer, Lan., 
6 .9881 Murray, Tren., 


107 584 170 14 

108 491 130 12 


.982 

.981 



PITCHERS' RECORDS. 

W. L. T. PC.[ Name and Club. W. L. T. PC. 

17 4 .816 F. Smith, Harris., 25 11 .694 

29 7 .8061 Emerson, Lan. -Read. 24 12 .667 




1, A. C. Hyde. President New Castle Club, Ohio and Pennsylvania 
League; 2, Thomas S. Haymond, President Fairmont Club. Pennsyl- 
vania and West Virginia League: 3. Edward J. Ransick, Presi- 
dent and Manager Portsmouth Club. Ohio State League; 4, E. E. 
Clepper, President Sharon Club, Ohio and Pennsylvania League; 
6, John G. Brackenridge, Manager Akron Club, Ohio and Penn- 
sylvania League: 6, Dan Koster, Secretary Erie Club, Ohio and 
Pennsylvania League. 

A GROUP OF MINOR LEAGUE CLUB OFFICIALS. 




1, C. T. Bland, President Portsmouth Club. Virginia League; 2, Chas. 
A. Shaffer. Manager Roanoke Club. Virginia League: 3, W. M. 
Hannan, Jr.. Secretary . Norfolk Club. Virginia League; 4. Otto 
Wells, President Norfolk Club. Virginia League: 5. Perry Lipe, 
Manager Richmond Club. Virginia League; 6, J. F. Sullivan, Presi- 
dent Savannah Club. South Atlantic League: 7, J. Alwyn Ball, 
President Charleston Club, South Atlantic League; 8, William C. 
West, President Jacksonville Club. South Atlantic League; 9, W, 
EL Gibbes, President Columbia Club, South Atlantic League. 
A GROUP OF MINOR LEAGUE CLUB OFFICIALS. 




1, Furchner; 2, Starr; 3, Alderman; 4, Campbell; 5, Holmes, Mgr. ; 

6, Green; 7, Granville; 8, McKay; 9, Vance; 10, Weed; 11, Crum; 

12, Andreas, Capt.; 13, Hester; 14, Shea; 15, Welch; 16, Freeman. 

X SIOUX CITY TEAM— CHAMPIONS WESTERN LEAGUE. 



>3 4 V 5 


* 




jtMBMI i .■r*~ /*H* tu^H BR* ^Hk 


4 





1, King; 2, Khoades; 3, Graham; 4, Belden; 5, Regan; 6, Gonding; 
7, Saunders; 8, Fisher; 9, Le Brand; 10,* Austin; 11, Autrey: 12, 
Welch; 13, Francks, Capt.; 14, W. A. Rourke, Owner: 15, Hollen- 
beck; 16, Hall. Lumiere Studio, Photo. 

OMAHA TEAM— WESTERN LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 181 

Western League 

By G. £• LaFollette, Sioux City, Iowa. 

Without doubt the ninth annual season of the Western League 
was one of the most prosperous in its history since the days of 
reorganization into six clubs. It closed in a furor of excitement 
at Sioux City, where Manager William Holmes in one season brought 
the club from a poor tail-ender to a pennant winner. To accom- 
plish the result he had to win sixteen out of the last seventeen 
games played. Incidentally, the race was so close it was necessary 
9 to take four out of the last five games played with Omaha, the 
1907 champions, who bade fair to take it again. It took the very 
last game on Monday, September 14, to decide. Had Omaha won 
the game it meant a post-season series between the two clubs and 
a pot of money for Manager Holmes and William Rourke. But to 
the credit of the game and more than ever confirming the conten- 
tion of its supporters that Base Ball is square, Sioux City won the 
contest and with it the bunting. 

An average of 5,000 people saw each game of the crucial series. 
Sunday, when a double-header was won by Sioux City, both games 
being a shut-out, more than 10,000 were present. 

Sioux City started with a strong team, which was strengthened 
from time to time. It was never below third place during the 
season. Omaha, Lincoln, Sioux City and Denver divided honors in 
leading the league a portion of the season, but the race soon nar- 
rowed to a fight between the first three, Denver slumping badly on 
account of injuries to some of its best players. Pueblo, as in 1907, 
started badly and did not gain its stride until too late in the 
season, but it won a big majority of its games after July 15 and 
closed strong. Des Moines, which finished last, was outclassed. 

Generally speaking, no untoward incident marked the progress 
of the race except once, when Pueblo, which gave its team poor 
support, wired President O'Neill to take charge. Arrangements 
were under way to transfer the club and franchise to St. Joseph, 
when a reorganization was effected and the club finished the 
season somewhat to the good, owing to sale of a number of players. 

The cities comprising the Western League showed added interest 
in the game and the attendance was generally good. It was espe- 
cially satisfactory in Sioux City, Omaha and Lincoln, which had 
/winning clubs. Denver. did well. President O'Neill at the annual 
meeting declared that three of the clubs made big money and that 
none lost. 

The season on the whole was very satisfactory. The six towns 
are made up of enterprising people and interest has been stimulated 
by the purchase of Wichita and Topeka from the Western Associa- 
tion, enlarging the circuit to eight clubs. The original six clubs 
Avill be under the same management as during the season of 1908, 
with the exception of Denver, where George Tebeau has sold his 
interest to J. P. Gunthorpe, who is an equal owner now with 
R. R. Burke. Wichita is owned by Frank Isbell of the White Sox 
and E. M. Holland ; Topeka by Dick Cooley. The addition of the 
twa towns and the entrance of Isbell and Cooley into the league 
presages a record breaker in interest and prosperity. 

At the close of the season the clubs were raided by the big 
leagues to some extent. Omaha lost three men, Des Moines two, 
Pueblo three and Sioux City its star pitcher Furchner, who was 
drafted by Cincinnati. Furchner and Freeman, the latter formerly 
with the White Sox, were the class of the league in pitchers. 

The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders in 
Batting and Fielding in the Western League in 1908, accord-. 







1, Bonno; 2, Wilson; 3, McKay; 4, Zackert; 5, Thomas; 6, King; 7, 
Sullivan; 8, Fenlon; 9, Williams; 10, Davidson; 11, Vice-Pres. 
Smith; 12, Gagnier; 13, Johnson; 14, Zinram; 15, Pies. Green; 16, 
Fox, Mgr.; 17, Reddick; 18, Pritchett. Townsend, Photo. 

LINCOLN TEAM— WESTERN LEAGUE. 




1, Krueger; 2, Belden; 3, Kinneally; 4, McDonongh; 5, Adams; 6, 
Cassady; 7, Waldron; 8, Olmstead; 9, Zaluski; 10, Bohannon; 11, 
Corbett; 12, Jackson; 13, Irwin, Mgr.; 14, White; 15, Lovett; 16, 
Ackley. 

DENVER TEAM— WESTERN LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



183 



ing to the official records, are given herewith. The complete 
official records are published in Spalding's Official Base Ball 
Record, for sale by all newsdealers, price 10 cents. 



STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 



Club. 
Sioux City, 
Omaha, 
Lincoln, 



G. 

145 
145 

147 



W. 



74 



L. 


PC. 


Club. 


G. 


W. 


L. 


PC. 


57 


.607 


Denver, 


146 


71 


75 


.486 


59 


.593 


Pueblo, 


141 


63 


78 


.447 


73 


.503 


Des Moines, 


148 


54 


94 


.365 



CHAMPIONSHIP WINNERS IN PREVIOUS YEARS. 



1900— Denver 581 

1901— Kansas City 642 

1902— Kansas City 603 

1903— Milwaukee 659 



1904— Omaha 600 

1905— Des Moines 646 

1906— Des Moines 660 

1907— Omaha 571 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 



Name and Club. 


G. AB. R. H. SH.PC. 


Name and Club. 


G. 


AB. R. H. SH.PC. 


Welch, Oma., 
Patterson, Pueb. 
Hatrey, Oma., 
Bader, D.M., 
Matticks, Pueb. 
Dwyer, D.M., 
King, Oma., 


147 497 69 180 19 .362 
115 397 78 128 22 .322 
147 534 91 171 21 .320 
67 241 32 77 9 .320 
143 563 93 179 14 .318 
139 532 77 169 8 .318 
145 537 94 164 29 .305 


L Belden, Den., 
Bohannon, Den., 
Fox, Lin.. 
Dolan, D.M., 
Nelson, D.M., 
Cassady, Den., 
Green, S.C., 


146 510 97 155 46 
69 189 27 57 6 

147 546 97 165 28 
101 349 41 104 13 

28 71 5 21 
149 561 75 165 25 
79 265 53 78 16 


.304 
.302 
.302 
.298 
.296 
.294 
.294 




INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 










FIRST BASEMEN. 








Name and Club 


G. PO. A. E. PC. 


Name and Club 




G. PO. A. E. 


PC. 


Dwyer, D.M., 
Autrey, Oma., 


135 1454 69 21 .986 
144 1328 87 24 .983 


Zalusky, Den., 
White Den., 




32 258 19 5 
112 921 53 19 


.982 
.981 




SECOND BASEMEN. 








Weed, S.C., 
Fox, Lin., 


21 43 51 3 .9691 Francks, Oma., 
147 349 370 27 .964lFitzpatrick, D.M 

THIRD BASEMEN. 


' 


21 62 51 5 
34 66 107 8 


.958 
.956 


Austin, Oma., 
Mitze, Pueb., 


146 256 325 36 .942|Pritchett, Lin., 
18 27 48 5 .938 1 Irwin, Den., 

SHORTSTOPS. 




125 134 261 29 
115 152 172 24 


.932 
.931 


Gagnier, Lin., 
Francks, Oma., 


149 388 495 45 .9521 Granville, S.C., 
120 277 332 39 .935|Belden, Den., 

OUTFIELDERS. 




144 239 392 44 
21 48 61 9 


.935 
.924 


Lovett, Den., 
JVelch, Oma., 


49 95 12 2 .982|McLear, D.M., 
147 297 14 6 .9811 Dexter, D.M., 




37 29 6 1 
58 61 6 2 


.972 
.971 


PITCHERS. 








Chabek, Den., 
Crutcher, S.C., 


17 2 39 1 .976|Hollenbeck, Oma. 
25 5 51 2 .966lBomar, D.M., 

CATCHERS. 


' 


40 9 86 4 
34 14 74 4 


.960 
.957 


Dexter, D.M., 
Zinran, Lin., 


15 98 21 2 1 .9831 
91 652 105 13 16 .983 | 


Shea. S.C., 
Smith, Pueb., 


92 562 99 17 9 
85 414 110 15 11 


.975 
.972 



PITCHERS' RECORDS. 

Name and Club. G. Won. Lost. Tie. SO. WP. BB. Help. PC. 

Regan, Omaha 37 29 7 1 163 2 116 5 .806 

Rhoades, Omaha 12 9 3 85 2 62 3 .750 

Furchner, Sioux City 42 30 11 1 267 11 129 4 .732 

Freeman, Sioux City 22 15 7 147 4 54 1 .682 




1, Patterson, Mgr. ; 2, Honska; 3, James; 4, Mattick; 5, Miller; 6, 
Spencer; 7, Smith; 8, Fitzgerald; 9, Galgano; 10, Clark; 11, Hog- 
riever; 12, Mitze; 13, Owens; 14, Corhan; 15, Carlile, Dir.; 16, Frank 
Selee, Dir. Wilson, Photo. 

PUEBLO TEAM— WESTERN LEAGUE. 




1, Nelson; 2, Dolan; 3, Witherup; 4, Ford; 5, Flournoy; 6, Yeager, 
7, McLaughlin; 8, Raedel; 9, Dwyer; 10, Bader; 11, Niehoff; 1A 
Fitzpatrick; 13, Dexter; 14, Anderson; 15, Bomar. 

DES MOINES TEAM— WESTERN LEAGUE. 




ier? U <T Wili?^ en i P ' esid ? nt Lincoln; 2, R. R. Burke, President Den- 
Presilenfp pSo ^ R w-n- ' Pr e sldent °™ h ^ 4, E. G. Middlekamp, 
president Pueblo; 5, William Holmes, President Sioux City 

^ A GROUP OF WESTERN LEAGUE CLUB OFFICIALS 





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1, Hyatt; 2, Hall; 3, Dell; 4, Dr. J. W. Brett, Stockholder; 5, Harry 
Duker, Sec; 6, E. J. O'Leary, Stockholder; 7, Erickson; 8, Flan- 
nigan; 9, Mahon; 10, Snyder; 11, Engle; 12, Nordyke, Capt.; 13, A. 
R. Dickson, Pres. and Mgr. ; 14, Sugden; 15, Franklin; 10, Paddock; 
17, Donovan; 18, Mundorff; 19, Quigley; 20, Abrogast; 21, W. Cutler. 
VANCOUVER TEAM, CHAMPIONS NORTHWESTERN LEAGUE. 




1, Butler; 2, Shea; 3, Kippert; 4, Kellackey; 5, Baker; 6, Geehan; 
7, Martinke; 8, Bresino; 9, Lynch, Capt.; 10, Mackin; 11, Carson; 
12, Suess; 13, Morse. 

TACOMA TEAM— NORTHWESTERN LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 187 

Northwestern League 

By J. Newton Colver, Spokane, Wash. 

The Vancouver team, tail-enders in 1907, strengthened by two 
veterans of the St. Paul American Association team, Sugden and 
Nordyke, with four or five brilliant youngsters and a couple of 
rejuvenated pitchers, Engle and R. Hall, won the Northwestern 
League pennant of 1908 with something to spare. The Vancouver 
victory well illustrates Base Ball. At least two other big towns 
on the circuit spent more money, at least two other cities turned out 
greater patronage ; all five were picked, at the start of the season, 
to beat out the 1907. tail-enders, but by pluck, pulling together, 
excellent luck in the physical condition of the men, the Canadian 
city on the circuit showed its American rivals the way to the 
wire. 

A. R. Dickson, the Vancouver manager, came from the bunch 
grass districts of the Big Bend country near Waterville, Wash., 
a raw recruit, and many smiled when his name appeared with the 
other magnates. Dickson quietly announced a deal for Nordyke 
and Sugden, and after the first gasp of astonishment there were 
no more smiles as the steady rise of the Vancouver club from last 
place ended in the pennant victory. » 

On the last Sunday of the season second place went to Tacoma, 
which beat out Aberdeen by half a game. Tacoma held up to the 
same high place in the percentage column that Mike Lynch is 
accustomed to driving his men toward. In three successive seasons 
at Tacoma Lynch won one pennant and finished second twice. 
Lynch has been sold to the Seattle club and will manage Dugdale's 
team in 1909. 

Robert Brown, who led the Aberdeen team to the front in 1907 
had bad luck with crippled players in mid-season and was abso- 
lutely last in early July. His team passed Seattle, Butte and 
Spokane in the stretch. Brown has bought a quarter interest in 
the Spokane club and will be player-manager here this year. 

The Spokane team was another great disappointment. On July 
4 it was over 100 points in the lead of the league. Sickness of two 
star pitchers and a general slump quickly pulled the team down, 
and it finished fourth. Hulen's ability to handle the men brought 
about some great Base Ball in Spokane in June and July, when 
attendance records were smashed to smithereens. 

Spokane broke all former attendance records known to the North- 
west by paying crowds to thirteen straight weeks of Base Ball. 
Butte fell down badly in attendance on account of the closing of 
the copper mines, and the floods of early June practically killed 
the game there. 

The Butte franchise was purchased at the end of the season by 
the league and voted to Portland, which city will support a team 
in both leagues, the Northwestern and Pacific Coast, both under the 
ownership and management of the McCredies, in 1909. Most of the 
Butte players were sold to Tacoma. 

Seattle was absolutely last. Dugdale had the worst luck of any 
manager in the history of Northwestern League Base Ball in losing 
men by sickness. 

Ten Northwestern Leaguers of 1908 have been called up to faster 
company. Flanagan of Vancouver goes to the Chicago Americans • 
and Hyatt of Vancouver to the Pittsburg Nationals by sale. Carson 
of Tacoma, Harkness of Butte, Fournier of Aberdeen and Dunn and 
Spoonemore of Spr ; ane were drafted by Portland. Mundorff of 
Vancouver was d'4a.'. J .ed by San Francisco, Sugden of Vancouver by 



1, Califf; 2, Moore; 3, Householder; 4, Pernoll; 5, Pender; 6, Boet- 
tiger; 7, Brinker; 8, Thompson; 9, Starkell; 10, Van Buren; 11, Fitz- 
gerald; 12, Streib; 13, Fournier; 14, Pres. Macfarlane; 15, Brown; 
Mgr.; 16, Campbell. 

ABERDEEN TEAM.— NORTHWESTERN LEAGUE. 




1, Spencer; 2, Cartwright; 3, Stis; 4, Irby; 5, Hurley; 6, Bender; 

7, EUis; 8, Swain; 9, Russ Hall, Mgr.; 10, Harkness; 11, Samuels. 

BUTTE TEAM— NORTHWESTERN LEAGUE. 

Ralston, Photo. 



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1, Brunstine; 2, Anderson; 3, Barington; 4, Rowan; 5, Childers; 6, 
Allen; 7, Fortier; 8, Frisk; 9, Bennett; 10, Orie*;-ll, Zimmerman; 
12, McKune, Capt. ; 13, Rush; 14, D. E. Dugdale, *?,res. and Mgr.; 
15, Stanley; 16, Seaton; 17, Cahill. 

SEATTLE TEAM— NORTHWESTERN LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



189 



Atlanta, and Shea of Tacoma by Augusta. B. Meyers of Seattle 
and J. Myers of Butte, of the 1907 Northwestern League teams, 
have been graduated after a year in the Class A team of St. Paul 
to the New York Nationals. 

The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders in 
Batting and Fielding in the Northwestern League in 1908, accord- 
ing to the official records, are given herewith. The complete 
official records are published in Spalding's Official Base Ball 
Record, for sale by all newsdealers, price 10 cents. 

STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 

Club. Won. Lost. PC. Club. Won. Lost. PC. 

Vancouver 85 62 .578 Spokane 72 75 .490 

Tacoma 74 66 .529 Butte 63 73 .463 

Aberdeen 73 69 .514. Seattle 65 87 .428 

CHAMPIONSHIP WINNERS IN PREVIOUS YEARS. 



1905 Everett 618 

1906 Tacoma 600 

1907 Aberdeen 625 



♦1901 Portland 675 

*1902 Butte 608 

♦1903 Butte 609 

1904 Boise 625 

* League called Pacific-Northwest. 

INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 
Name and Club. G. AB. R. H.SH.PC.I Name and Club. 
Flanagan, V., 130 4S4 63 170 15 .352 J. Bennett, Se., 

Hyatt, V., 149 573102 185 25 .323>McKune, Se., 

INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 
FIRST BASEMEN. 
Name and Club. G. PO. A. E. PC. j Name and Club. G. PO. A. E. 
Nordvke, V., 146 1555 140 12 .993 Hurley, B., 119 1141 79 23 

Streib, A., 137 132S 42 10 .993lKellackey, T., 96 988 47 20 



G. AB. R. H.SH.PC. 

154 571 81 174 10 .305 
68 266 40 79 13 .297 



Moore, A., 135 

J. Bennett, Se., 154 



Cartwright, B., 73 
Oriet, Se., 43 



Bresino, T., 136 

Brown, A., 122 



93 95 8 
149 184 15 



36 53 77 
145 218 293 



66 134 205 27 
19 32 50 7 



Ross. Se.-A., 
I Lynch, T., 



Pernoll. A.. 20 

Franklin, T.-Se.-V. 27 



Sugden, V., 
Stanley. Se., 



Name and Club. 
Engel, Vancouver . . . 
W. Hall, Vancouver 
Erickson, Vancouver 
Harkness, Butte 



SECOND BASEMEN. 
146 391 30 .961 Flick. T.-Sp.-B., 37 
,52 523 41 .960.Mackin, Sp.-T., 55 

THIRD BASEMEN. 
.03 144 15 .9431 Campbell. A.. 
51 81 8 .943| W. Snyder, V. 

SHORTSTOPS. 

!71 471 44 .944'McKune, Se., 
:77 325 44 .932, Gray, V., 

OUTFIELDERS. 
50 1 l.OOOlMartinke, T., 
159 17 9 .9681 Dunn, Sp., 

PITCHERS. 
3 60 1. 000 f Engel. V.. 
9 91 1 .990IStarkell, A., 

CATCHER^. 

320 73 4 .990|Dannv Sh^n. T., 117 
361 98 6 .987lReniker, bp., 17 

PITCHERS' RECORDS. 

G. AB. H. SO. BB. WP. HB. W. 

.... 34 990 197 117 66 8 5 22 

.... 29 884 179 75 55 1 10 17 

.... 33 1021 226 115 78 4 18 22 



PC. 

.981 
.981 



.959 
.957 



.942 
.924 



34 37 110 
37 16 118 



552 151 14 
91 27 3 



.926 
.921 



.967 
.967 



.9S7 
.985 



.980 
.975 



46 1310 292 212 118 13 11 22 15 



PC. 
.733 
.708 
.667 
.595 



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1, D. S. Compton. President Vicksburg Club, Cotton States League; 

2, Roy Montgomery, Manager Jackson Club, Cotton States League; 

3, R. J. - Gilks, Manager Gulf port Club, Cotton States League; 4, 
Horace E. King, Vice-President and Manager Goldsboro Club, East- 
ern Carolina League; 5, V. B. McFadden, President Rock Hill 
Club, South Carolina League; 6, Paul Hardin, President Chester 
Club, South Carolina League; 7, L. A. James, President Greenville 
Club, Carolina Association; 8,' Furman Smith, President Anderson 
Club, Carolina Association; 9- D. W. Collins, Manager Charlotte 
Club, Carolina Association. 

A GROUP OF MINOR LEAGUE CLUB OFFICIALS. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 191 

Cotton States League 

By Frederick SuIIens, Jackson, Miss. 

The Cotton States League approaches the season of 1909 with 
very encouraging prospects. 

President P. S. Merrill, who was chosen to succeed Hon. A. C. 
Crowder when the latter resigned because of his election to the 
Mayoralty of Jackson, has taken hold in a very business-like manner, 
and confidence is felt that he will make a splendid executive head. 

There will be no changes in the circuit this year, the league 
consisting of Jackson, Gulfport-Biloxi, Vicksburg, Meridian, Colum- 
bus and Monroe, but all of the teams will have new managers, and 
a majority of the players will be men who have not heretofore 
appeared in Cotton States uniforms. 

With a season of one hundred and twenty games and tfye same 
cities composing the circuit it is not likely that the new schedule 
will contain many radical changes. Last year's schedule proved 
very satisfactory. 

Leagues of higher class have drawn heavily on the Cotton States 
since the 1908 season, a half-dozen or more stars going to major 
company. 

President Merrill has a choice list of material from w T hich to 
select his staff of umpires. 

Vicksburg and Meridian will have new ball parks, the grounds 
used last season having been divided into building lots. The other 
clubs will use the parks they have hitherto occupied. 

"I am not inclined to indulging in forecasts," says President 
Merrill, "but all indications point to a prosperous season in our 
tight little league. I believe we are going to give patrons an article 
of ball fully as good as they have heretofore enjoyed, and that the 
teams will be much more evenly matched than in former seasons. 
Last year some of the clubs had a bad start, but they are getting 
to work early, and will not indulge in so many costly experi- 
ments." 

The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders in 
Batting and Fielding in the Cotton States League in 1908, accord- 



tit ^.| ft % 



^4/V^V '&&. 






1, Barber; 2, Miller; 3, Claire; 4, Blakeley; 5, Veasey; 6, Saillard; 

7, Taylor; 8, Montgomery, Mgr.; 9, Kline; 10, Blackburn; 11. Ott; 

12, Pickens. Sweeny, Photo. 

JACKSON TEAM, CHAMPIONS COTTON STATES LEAGUE. 




1, Dudley; 2, Sample; 3, Klowther; 4, Boyd; 5, Blackburn, Mgr.; 6, 
Robb; »7, LaGraver; 8, G. Manush; 9, Dorsey; 10, Meander; 11, 
Herold. yiCKSBURG TEAM— COTTON STATES LEAGUE. 





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1, Roberts; 2, Murch; 3, Krebs; 4, Schultz; 5, Halland; 6, Reiley; 
7, Lively; 8, Tenney; 9, Gardner, Mascot; 10, Carlin; 11, McManus; 
12, Gilks, Mgr.; 13, Gettinger; 14, Groffus. 

GULFPORT (MISS.) TEAM— COTTON STATES LEAGUE. 

Thalmann & Hannie, Photo. 




1, Ollre; 2, Downing; 3. Geiser: 4, Durmeyer; 5, Manush: 6, Corbett; 
7, Marshall; 8, Hall, Mgr.; 9, Allison; 10, Demaree; 11, Ling; 12, 
May. COLUMBUS TEAM— COTTON STATES LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



193 



lng to the official records, are given herewith. The complete 
official records are published in Spalding's Official Base Ball 
Record., for sale by all newsdealers, price 10 cents. 



STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 

Club. G. W. L. PC.) Club. G. W. 

Jackson, 110 68 42 .618 Columbus, 114 57 

Vicksburg, 115 66 49 .574 Meridian, 114 47 

Gulfport, 116 64 52 .552lMonroe. 115 40 



L. 


PC. 


57 


.500 


67 


.412 


75 


.348 



CHAMPIONSHIP WINNERS IN PREVIOUS YEARS. 

1902— Natchez 51911905— Greenville 682 

1903— Baton Rouge 644 1906— Mobile 628 

1904— Pine Bluff 621 Il907— Mobile 612 



Name and Club. 
Huber, Columbus, 
Lively, Gulfport, 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 
G. AB.R. H. PC! Name and Club. 
24 97 19 34 .350 Manush, Columbus, 
68 208 26 62 .298|Kutina, Meridian, 



G. AB.R. H.PC. 



119 460 39 136 
36 133 19 39 



.296 
293 



Name and Club. 
Klawitter, Vicks., 
Carnes, Meridian, 



Dorsey, Col. -Vicks., 
Evans, Gulfport, 



Addington, Monroe, 
Blackburn, Jackson, 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 

FIRST BASEMEN. 

G. PO. A. E. PC. | Name and Club. 

29 269 21 3 .989 Gilks, Gulfport, 

111 1076 52 14 .988iLing, Columbus, 

SECOND BASEMEN. 
38 113 86 5 .975[Moulton. Meridian. 
74 154 179 13 .962|Corbett, Mon.-Col., 

THIRD BASEMEN. 

119 156 270 18 ,958|LeGrove, Mon.-Vick., 
107 130 208 20 .944| Herald, Vicksburg, 



G. PO. A. E. 


PC. 


92 925 53 15 


.985 


67 551 36 10 


.933 


62 164 161 13 


.961 


56 155 142 16 


.953 


42 61 101 10 


.942 


47 93 146 15 


.941 



SHORTSTOPS. 
Huber, Columbus, 24 59 75 10 .930[Dobart, Meridian, 

Durmeyer, Columbus, 95 244 277 39 .929|Dorsey, Col.-Vicks., 



84 143 278 35 .923 
40 107 119 19 .922 



Bates, Meridian. 
Civeraux, Meridian, 



OUTFIELDERS. 
20 21 lOOOlOllre, Mer.-Col., 50 61 

16 18 3 lOOOlBoyd, Vicksburg, 19 39 



PITCHERS. 
Blackburn, Vicksb'g, 19 9 27 1000|Billiard, Meridian, 
Klawitter Vicksburg, 24 10 65 1 .987lEllinor, Meridian, 



32 12 63 1 .987 
37 21 98 2 .984 



Ott, Jackson, 
Graffius, Gulfport, 



CATCHERS. 

94 579 93 8 .988|Krebs, Vicksburg, 
79 495 91 9 .985lFuller, Meridian, 



80 372 86 8 .983 
68 426 77 10 .980 



Name and Club. 
Sample, Vicksburg, 
Miller, Jackson, 



PITCHERS' RECORDS. 

W. L. T. PCI Name and Club. W. L. T. PC 

19 6 1 .760 Barber, Jackson, 21 9 2 .700 

18 6 1 .750 1 Roberts, Gulfport, 7 4 .636 







































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1, Roth; 2, Taffee; 3, Buesse; 4, Viola; 5, Dwyer; 6, Lewis; 7, Han- 
sen; 8, Hauser; 9, Ward; 10, Garbutt; 11, Mullaney, Mgr.; 12, 
Clancy; 13, Goetell; 14, Lee; 15, Salomon, Trainer; 16, Bierkotte; 17, 
O'Neal; 18, McMillan. 
JACKSONVILLE TEAM, CHAMPIONS SOUTH ATLANTIC LEAGUE. 



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1, Hixon; 2, Keiber; 3, Haidt; 4, Mullin; 5, Pelkey; 6, Hoff; 7, 
Thiel; 8, Morris; 9, Moran; 10, Kalkoff; 11, Shaw; 12, Richardson; 
13, Howard. Foltz, Photo. 

SAVANNAH TEAM— SOUTH ATLANTIC LEAGUE. 



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dascot; 2, Ragan; 3, Hartley: 4. Kahrs; 5, Carson; 6, Coles; TV 
Hornhorst; 8, McLanren; 9. Harnish; 10, Mullin; 11, Busch; 
12, McMahon; 13, Bierman ; 14, Sitton. 

AUGUSTA TEAM— SOUTH ATLANTIC LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. ig5 

South Atlantic League 

By Laurence B. Woltz, Jacksonville, Fla. 

The 190S pennant of the South Atlantic League was easily won 
by Jacksonville, which club was managed by Dominick J. Mullaney. 
\yhile the season of 1908 was not as successful from a financial 
standpoint as former seasons, the "fans" nevertheless saw a high 
class of ball. 

Jacksonville had the best club from the start. There were not 
three changes made by the team after the season opened. 

The pitching staff that won the pennant for Jacksonville con- 
sisted of Lee, Sitton, Helm and Goetell. Of this number Lee is 
the only one who will return, the others having been drafted or 
sold. Sitton pitched remarkable ball, in fact, he twirled the same 
high caliber of ball that made him a wonder with the Nashville club 
of the Southern League. 

The Savannah team fought the Jacksonville aggregation tooth 
and nail until July 4, but after that time the club that won the 
pennant simply outclassed its opponents. 

The Charleston club, pennant winner of 1907, was managed by 
Meaney, who had captained the club the previous season. Meaney 
had some good material, but everything appeared to break the wrong 
way for him from the very opening. 

Charley Dexter started in as manager of the Augusta club, but 
before the season ended he was transferred to New Orelans, where 
he played star ball for the Southern League club of that city. 
When Dexter left the club was given to Heinie Busch, who did 
exceptionally well. 

Win Clark managed Columbia and gave the people of that city 
a good team. 

The coming season should prove the banner year for the South 
Atlantic League. Chattanooga (Tenn.) and Columbia (Ga.) are 
now members. 

The club owners of the various teams are enthusiastic over the 
prospects of the coming season. The parks throughout the league 
are being placed in the best of condition. 

The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders in 
Batting and Fielding in the South Atlantic League in 1908, accord- 
ing to the official records, are given herewith. The complete 
official records are published in Spalding's Official Base Ball 
Record, for sale by all newsdealers, price 10 cents. 

STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 
Club. Won. Lost. P.C.I Club. Won. Lost. P.C. 

Jacksonville 77 34 .694|Columbia 46 58 .442 

Savannah 64 45 .5S7|Macon 48 68 .412 

Augusta 51 59 .464|Charleston 44 66 .400 

CHAMPIONSHIP WINNERS IN PREVIOUS YEARS. 

1904— Macon 5ys 11906— Savannah 637 

1905— Macon 62511907— Charleston 620 

INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 
Name and Club. G. AB. R.BH.PC. Name and Club. G. AB. R.BH.PC. 
Murdock, Mac, 120 463 51 140 .302 Steubbe, Mac, 16 44 7 13.296 

Dexter, Aug., 57 190 27 57 .300; 

INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 
FIRST BASEMEN. 
Name and Club. G. PO. A. E. PC.| Name and Club. G. PO. A. E. PC. 

Valdois, Aug.-Col., 22 225 23 3 .993 Mullaney, Jax., 97 1017 65 10 .991 

Morgan, Sav., 38 442 16 3 .993 Hornhorst, Aug., 47 501 13 10 .981 




1, Manion; 2, Gibbes; 3, Volz; 4, Welsher; 5, Kiernan; 6, Cote; 7, 

Bigbee; 8, Sec. Gibbes; 9, W. W. Clarke, Mgr. ; 10, Wagnon; 11, 

Valdois; 12, Salve. Columbia Studio, Photo. 

COLUMBIA TEAM— SOUTH ATLANTIC LEAGUE. 




; 1, Murdoch, Mgr. ; 2, Wohleben; 3, Stowers; 4, Clarke; o, Lewis; (j, 
: Robinson; 7, Leavings; 8, Shea; 9, Rhoton; 10, Millirons; 11, 
McLaughlin; 12, Deitz. 

MACON TEAM— SOUTH ATLANTIC LEAGUE. 




1, Durlin; 2, Ball; 3. Clancey; 4. Durrett; 5, Willis; 6, Paige; 7, 
Reisinger; 8, Meany, Mgr.; 9, O'Halloran; 10, Lewis; 11, Wilkinson; 
12, Lohr; 13, Carolan. 

CHARLESTON TEAM—SOUTH ATLANTIC LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE* 



m 



SECOND BASEMEN. 



Name and Club. 


G. PO. A. E. PCI Name and Club. 


G. POo &> £. 


PC. 


Morris, Sav., 
Rhoton, Mac, 


21 61 60 4 .968Busch, Aug., 
119 314 311 26 .960'Haidt, Sav., 

THIRD BASEMEN. 


31 79 86 7 

71 152 189 16 


.959 
.955 


Dwyer, Jax., 
Lewis. Chas.,. 


71 79 158 11 .955fValdois, Aug.-Col., 
112 118 283 24 .926|Collett, Mac.-Sav., 

SHORTSTOPS. 


49 56 102 13 
42 39 81 11 


.924 
.916 


Morris, Sav., 
Bierman, Aug., 


99 206 317 39 .930 ! McMillen, Jax., 
115 206 312 46 .918|Manion, Col., 

OUTFIELDERS. 


106 156 304 41 
106 196 271 51 


.918 
.906 


Gunter, Col., 
Meaney, Chas., 


16 30 2 1000! Howard, Sav., 
112 123 8 1 .993jKiernan, Col., 


99 204 20 2 
80 122 6 2 


.991 
.985 



PITCHERS. 
Hansen, Jax., 13 8 48 1000|Welsher, Col., 

Richardson,Aug.-Sav. 15 11 36 . .979|Durrett, Chas., 



Roth, Jax., 
Cote, Col., 



CATCHERS. 

114 598 126 9 .9S3Harnish, Col.-Aug., 
70 440 88 7 .987iDurlin, Chas., 



40 27 126 4 .975 
12 1 38 1 .975 



58 306 81 6 .985 
45 156 37 3 .985 



PITCHERS' SUMMARY. 



t Opp.- 





IP. 


AB.BH. R. BB.SO. 


IP. AB.BH. R. BB.SO. 


V. Sitton, 
Helm, 


213 
151 


740 105 35 46 164 Viebohn, 
505 94 24 48 100jL.ee, 

PITCHERS' RECORDS. 


128 425 80 27 33 87 
228 790 156 40 34 88 




G. 


W. L. T. PC.| 


G. W. L. T. PC. 


V. Sitton, 
Helm, 


"23 

17 


17 5 1 .7731 Viebohn, 
11 4 2 .7331 Lee, 


13 8 3 2 .727 
25 17 7 1 .708 




1, Atkins; 2, Brown; 3. Badger: 4, Slater; 5. Hise; 6. Crabble* 7 
Epler: 8, Russell: 9. Kane; 10, Watson: 11, Weikart: 12. Edmonson • 
13, Riley; 14, Christian; 15, Carlin; 16, Wolff; 17, Lauzon; 18, 
Smith. 

GALVESTON TEAM— TEXAS LEAGUE. 




1, Daniel F. Cloheey, President Haverhill; 2, Matthew M. Mc- 
Cann. President Lynn; 3, Alexander Winn, President and Manager 
Lowell; 4, Jesse C. Burkett, President and Manager Worcester; 5, 
William Hamilton, Manager Haverhill; 6, S. D. Flanagan", President 
and Manager Brockton; 7, Mai Eason, Manager Lawrence. 
> A GROUP OF NEW ENGLAND LEAGUE CLUB OFFICIALS. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



199 



New England League 

By President T. H. Murnane 

The little old New England League will 
commence the season of 1909 with the same 
cities that finished the last two years. 
thereby showing marked improvement over 
the early history of the game in New Eng- 
land, and giving a substantial proof of the 
stability of an organization keeping as close 
as possible to the salary limit placed on a 
Class B minor league. 

The population of the cities now compris- 
ing the New England League is. in round 
numbers, 700,000, while less than one hun- 
dred miles separate the most distant cities. 
Short circuits and salary limits are the 
foundation of all Base Ball leagues under 
Class A. 

With the proper foundation the aim of 
this league has been to see that the public 
received improved accommodations at the ball parks, thereby being 
in a better position to inculcate a true love for the national pastime. 
An honest effort to make the proprietors of newspapers see the 
necessity of sending thei" best writers to report the doings on the 
ball held, with the knowledge that our best citizens read Base Ball 




T. H. Murnane 

President 

New England League 




-v"*! Jill 



>yt?*«3 .-*£ 



HM 



1, John J. O'Donnell. Sec.-Treas. : 2. Bradley: 3. Leverenz: 4. Keady; 
5, Jesse C. Burkett. Mgr. ; 6. Logan; 7. Reynolds; S. Gurley: 9. Bar- 
berich; 10, Blackburn; 11, Schwartz; 12. Russell; K3, Singleton; 14, 
Owens; 15, McCann; 16, Lavigne. 

WORCESTER TEAM, CHAMPIONS NEW ENGLAND LEAGUE. 



'»! >»2 Ml M "S 

* 7 ,#. <f».£ / l0 jj. 



:%» ^ 



1, McLane; 2, Kelly; 3, Duggan: 4. Murch; 5, Maybohm; 6, Vinson; 
7, Connaughton; 8, Wilson; 9, Whiting; 10, M. W. Eason, Mgr. ; 11,. 
E. L. Arundel, Pres. ; 12, Harter; 13, Gilroy; 14, Flynn. Kenefick„ 
LAWRENCE TEAM— NEW ENGLAND LEAGUE. Photo. 



H 


:./■?*■ -H J(fc 




ȣ^v 


«*§: 














LSiJ^ 




:•'. j# ^jfcuji *. ^ ^ x 











I, Murphy; 2, Andrews; 3, Templin; 4, Ball; 5, Boardman; 6, Pres. 
Clohecy; 7, Hamilton, Mgr.; 8. Courtney; 9, 0' Toole; 10, Reilly; 

II, Mclnnis; 12, Gerard; 13, Fullerton; 14, Perkins; 15, Friel; 16, 
Follansbie; 17, Clohecy, Jr., Mascot; 18, Clohecy, Jr., Mascot. 

HAVERHILL TEAM— NEW ENGLAND LEAGUE. 





<£& ' V 


A 5 




|r" 


JhW""^.**' "■"'*». 




JBMSi^^rP 


JlNAte 




* ii v 


l^i 3 




kHNAt UtitiMd^ 


TO* 


M >'*. W '"t dff. A- 



1, Daum; 2, Lovell; 3, Ort; 4, Barton; 5, Clemens; 6, Gardner; 
7, Leonard, Mgr.; 8, Abbott; 9», Welsh; 10, O'Donnell; 11, LabeDe; 
12, S. O'Donnell; 13, Foster. 

LYNN TEAM— NEW ENGLAND LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 201 

reports, and should be furnished with clean-cut and unprejudiced 
reports that appeal to the young and old alike. 

The umpire question is still unsolved in this part of the country 
with little hope of improvement until the patrons of the game 
fully realize that umpires are but human. I believe the class of 
umpires has improved and with the lead taken by the major leagues 
in disciplining players the smaller leagues will eventually become 
reconciled to the fact that interference with the official's duty is 
simply handicapping the progress of the game. 

The rule in this league is to have as few old players as possible, 
outside of those necessary to lead and instruct the young talent, 
so abundant in this part of the country, ever anxious to break in 
to the business with the hope of eventually raking down the big 
money offered to the stars of the profession. 

The New England League has made a point of settling its own 
cases and doing its business in such a way with other leagues that 
Secretary John H. Farrell is seldom called on for a decision. 

The quality of ball put up by the New England League is but a 
shade inferior to that of the Class A leagues, and fully as enjoy- 
able as the games of the major leagues, for after all it is the well- 
matched teams that give the interesting contests, especially where 
the rising young player is working overtime to show the form that 
will attract the major league clubs. 

I look for our clubs to be more evenly matched than ever this 
coming season, and for that reason a bigger financial success even 
than last year. 

Clean uniforms, well-kept grounds, the absence of objectionable 
language, both off and on the field by the men connected with the 
game, fairly tempered reports of the games by the scribes, and 
the game is sure to flourish like a pine tree on the Sierras ; for 
the American people have gradually grown to appreciate the game 
that makes the boy a man and the old man a boy again. 

Among the well-known veteran ball players who will have full 
charge of clubs this season I might mention Jesse Burkett, wlio 
was a pronounced success at Worcester ; Thomas Dowd will have 
charge of the New Bedford club, and few have a better record in 
Class B than the Holyoke swell dresser ; Mai Eason will once more 
pilot the Lawrence club, while Frank Connaughton will handle the 
reins at Haverhill ; William Hamilton will manage the Lynn club 
and, with Burkett, will hold the unique distinction of having been 
leaders at the bat when they were members of the National League. 

The season will open this year one week earlier than usual and 
close in the week of Labor Day. 

For the last eight years this league has played every game 
scheduled, and is now working under a ten-year agreement with 
three years more to run. 

Starting out as a charter member of the National Association 
and thriving under the conditions imposed by the National Agree- 
ment, the New England League now stands, as always, absolutely 
for organized Base Ball, and can honestly recommend this organiza- 
tion to every ball club that plays under the Stars and Stripes. 
Quoting the words of A. G. Spalding : "Where the flag goes, there 
you will find our glorious National Game." 

Once more the New England League wishes every club in organ- 
ized Base Ball "the top of the morning," and the best of luck 
in 1909. 

The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders in 
Batting and Fielding in the New England League in 1908, accord- 
ing to the official records, are given herewith. The complete 
official records are published in Spalding's Official Base Ball 
Record, for sale by all newsdealers, price 10 cents. 




1, Cummings; 2, Toomey; 3, Bowcock; 4, Messenger; 5, Solbraa; t>, 
White; 7, Grant; 8, O'Brien, Mgr. ; 9, Donovan; 10, Wormwood; 11, 
Kane; 12, Sullivan; 13. Devine; 14, Norris. 





FALL RIVER 


TEAM— NEW 


ENGLAND LEAGUE. 






''HI t j-S'SaTl 










y^ga 










Hp^:' t> if %^S 




2J;- 
















\ / 


$ .. h** 


*"*•- ,^V :. , 


"* 



1, Hogan; 2, Cox; o, Duval; 4, Greenwell; 5, Doran; 6, Beard: 7, J. 
Connors; 8, Musil; 9. Magee; 10, Lemieux; 11, Howard; 12, Wolfe; 
13, Warner; 14, Yandergrift. 

LOWELL TEAM— NEW ENGLAND LEAGUE. 




1, Barrows; 2. Merrill: 3. Corcoran. Mgr.; 4, Lord; 5, Murray; 6, 
DeLave; 7, Shea; 8, Conley; 9, Jache; 10, Monahan; 11, Adler; 12, 
Duff. NEW BEDFORD TEAM— NEW ENGLAND LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



203 



STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 





Wor. 


Law. Hav. Broc, Lynn F.Riv. Low 


. N.Bed. 


Won 


PC. 


Worcester 

Lawrence 

Haverhill 

Brockton 

Lynn 

Fall River 

Lowell 

New Bedford . . 


# 8 
6 
4 
9 
8 
4 
5 


10 

7 

7 
6 
8 
•5 
6 


• 


10 14 9 10 14 

11 11 12 8 13 

5 14 13 13 

12 .. 8 11 12 

4 8.. 9 9 

5 6 9.. 7 
5 6 9 11 

5 6 9 8 7 




13 
12 
13 
12 

9 
10 

9 


80 
75 
71 
66 
54 
53 
49 
46 




.645- 
.60S 
.581 
.54L 
.435- 
.431 
.39S 
.371 


Lost 


44 49 
ONSHIP 


52 56 70 70 75 
WINNERS IN PREVIOUS 


78 
SEASONS. 






CHAM PI 




1891 — Worcester 








... .653 


1900— Portland ... 










.587 


1892— Woonsocket 
1893— Fall River 








... .670 
. . . .667 


1901— Portland . . . 
1902— Manchester 
1903— Lowell 


.598, 
.681 


1894 — Fall River 








... .634 










.637 


1895 — Fall River 








... .632 
... .636 


1904 — Haverhill . . 










.656- 


1896 — Fall River 


1905— Concord 

1906— Worcester . 
1907 — Worcester . 










.639" 


1397 — Brockton . . 








... .654 


.638 


1898— Newport-Brc 
1899— Portland . . 


ckton . . 




... .667 










.679* 




... .636 
















INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 












Name and Club. 


G. AB. R.H.SH.PC. Name and Club. 


G. 


AB. 


R.H.SH.PC. 


Catterson, B., 
Gardner, Ly., 
Beard, Lo., 
Mclnnis, H., 
Boardman, H., 


114 428 66 140 24 .327 
61 246 26 75 6 .305 
59 209 26 63 10 .301 
51 186 24 56 14 .301 

120 462 53 139 25 .301 


Howard, Lo., 
Burkett, W., 
Hamilton, H., 
Vinson, La., 


116 440 58 131 11 
97 375 49 110 11 
85 300 63 87 9 
69 238 42 68 17 


.298 
.293 
.290* 
.290 






INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 












Name and Club. 


G. 


PO. 


FIRST BASEMEN. 
A. E. PC.| Name and Club. 


G. 


PO 


A. 


E. 


PC. 


Murch. La., 
Bradley, W., 


103 1099 
127 1368 


67 

94 


7 .994 McGovern, B., 
10 .9931 Connors, Lo., 


95 
16 


1098 
158 


68 
12 


13 
2 


.989 
.988 


Connaughton, La., 84 
J.Con'r, FR-Ly-Lo, 97 


SECOND BASEMEN. 

191 272 14 .9711 Lord, N.B., 
244 27S 20 .963|Reilly, H., 


118 
76 


334 259 
176 215 


25 
19 


.960 
.954 


Donovan, F.R., 
Boardman, H., 


65 
120 


THIRD BASEMEN. 

88 185 18 .938 [Singleton, H.-W., 
137 279 31 .930lThornhill, FR-W, 


35 

56 


50 

57 


68 
154 


10 
20 


.922r 
.915 


Corcoran, N.B., 
Mclnnis, H., 


50 
51 


111 135 
113 147 


SHORTSTOPS. 

13 .950|Blackburne, W., 

18 .935|Bowcock, F.R., 


126 
58 


262 389 
124 155 


46 
20 


.934 
.933 


Howard, Lo., 
Beard, Lo., 


115 
44 


256 
67 


17 
11 


OUTFIELDERS. 
3 .988|Johnson, W.-La., 
1 .987|Pulsifer, Ly., 


35 
28 


57 
52 


5 
5 


1 
1 


.984 
.983 


Abbott, Ly., 
Leverenz, W., 


37 
29 


10 142 

7 87 


PITCHERS. 

3 .981IKenniston, Lo., 

2 .979|Finlayson, B., 


17 
15 


10 
8 


56 
55 


2 
2 


.971 

.960 


McGovern, B., 
Damn, Ly., 


26 
73 


162 39 
362 138 


CATCHERS. 

2 .990iEaton, La., 

7 .986|Lavigne, W., 


35 
43 


195 
241 


46 
56 


5 

7 


.984 
.977 


Name and Club. 




PITCHERS' RECORDS. 
Tv . L. PC. j Name and Club. 




W. 


L. 


PC. 


Friel, H., 
Eason, La., 




12 

16 




2 .857 
4 .800 


Leverenz, W., 
O'Toole, B., 




24 
31 


8 
11 




.750 
.738 




1, Bert Annis, President South Bend; 2, L. D. Smith, President Terre 
Haute; 3, Claude H. Varnell, President Fort Wayne; 4, B. F. Per- 
kins, President Wheeling; 5, Joseph A. Wolff, President Dayton; 
45, Harry Stahlhofer, President Evansville. 

A GROUP OF CENTRAL LEAGUE CLUB OFFICIALS. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 205 

Central League 

By De Earl Mushlitz, Evansville, bid. 

For sustained interest and class of sportsmanship no minor league 
excelled the Central in 1908. The league enjoyed its banner year. 
With one exception every club made money. The attendance exceeded 
half a million. Evansville was first with 84,277, and Dayton second 
with 82,632. 

The pennant was not won until after September 6, within two 
days of the end of the 140-game schedule. Then, by taking the 
first game at Terre Haute, Evansville clinched the lead it had 
maintained by a wavering margin since July 21. 

Evansville proved staying qualities by going through a long and 
trying road tour in July and returning home in second place and 
rapidly gaining on Dayton. From that day when Evansville, by 
defeating Wheeling, took first place, there was a stiff battle, with 
Evansville holding its own against Dayton, Grand Rapids and 
South Bend. 

Dayton, with an unblemished record throughout the first half 
of the season and with a machine as perfect as ever was seen in 
the league, would have remained pace-follower but for reverses in 
middle and late August. Evansville and Dayton, tied for first place, 
met for three games at Evansville on August 17. Evansville took 
the first and the third, and Dayton the second. Evansville kept 
the lead thereafter. 

Another club, contesting the lead which Evansville had been 
keeping doggedly since late July, was South Bend, which fought the 
Evansville pace-makers earnestly, finishing second in a strong spurt. 
Grand Rapids showed mettle early in the year and led for several 
days. Its organized play attested the skilful management of Robert 
Lowe, the old Tiger. 

Evansville began with a seasoned club, which underwent one 
change in the field and two additions in pitchers. Between it and 
Dayton, the two teams racing for leadership when excitement was 
highest, there was the toss of a coin as to team ability, man for 
man. 

The season was the league's most successful in six years for 
Clean and elevating sport, finances and the welding of ties that 
insure growth and permanency. Under the leadership of one of 
the shining lights in minor Base Ball to-day, Dr. F. R. Carson, it 
has no internal disputes. 

Evansville probably broke a record with four players advancing 
to major company in one year, the men being Dunn, Kustus, Wacker 
and French. Dayton sent Rowan, Bayless and Bescher, and Fort 
Wayne, Corns, Elston and Osteen. 

The Central's 1908 season began with two shiftings of cities. 
Fort Wayne returned by taking over the champions of 1907 from 
Springfield, Ohio, Jack Hendricks continuing as manager. Zanes- 
ville, Ohio, i took the Canton (Ohio) franchise. Martin Hogart 
managed Zanesville and reorganized Canton from, top to bottom. 
Lew Drill, formerly of St. Paul, did capable work at Terre Haute*, 
and Tom Fleming, succeeding Teddy Price at Wheeling, overcame 
many obstacles, although unable to lift that team above last place. 
The new season will see another management at Grand Rapids. 

The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders in 
Batting and Fielding in the Central League in 1908, accord- 
ing to the official records, are given herewith. The complete 
official records are published in Spalding's Official Base Ball. 
Record, for sale by all newsdealers, price 10 cents. 



^^ j ^flE^M JHHbk 




4» 

M •• M 



1, Dunn; 2, Pres. Harry W. Stahlhofer; 3, Knoll, Mgr.; 4, Treas. 
Mark N. Gross; 5, Grefe; 6, Ferrias; 7, Pearson; 8, Wacker; 9, 
Beiss; 10, Malloy; 11, Spangler; 12, French; 13, Crowder; 14, Sager; 
15, Norcum; 16, Kustus. 

EVANSVILLE TEAM, CHAMPIONS CENTRAL LEAGUE. 




1, C. Albers; 2, Newcomb; 3, Martin; 4, Hay worth; 5, Kelley; 6, 
Sheehan; 7, Koehler; 8, Grant, Mgr. and Capt. ; 9, Bert Annis, Pres.; 
10, Coffee; 11, Smith; 12, Moore; 13, Kroy; 14, Tieman; 15, Craven; 
16, Kurke; 17, Lindsey; 18, Foy. 

SOUTH BEND TEAM— CENTRAL LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



207 



STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 



Evans. 


So.B. 


Dayt. Ft 


W. 


G.Rap 


. Zan. 


T.Ht 


Whl 


. Won 


PC. 


Evansville 


12 


12 


13 


9 


10 


11 


17 


84 


.600 


South Bend 8 




14 


8 


14 


12 


8 


16 


80 


.571 


Dayton 8 


i 




12 


12 


11 


13 


15 


77 


.556 


Ft. Wayne 7 


12 


8 




9 


13 


10 


16 


75 


.536 


Grand Rapids.. 11 


6 


8 


ii 




10 


13 


9 


68 


.496 


Zanesville — 10 


8 


9 


7 


io 




13 


10 


67 


.479 


Terre Haute... 9 


12 


7 


10 


6 


7 




12 


63 


.457 


Wheeling 3 


4 


5 


4 


11 


10 


7 




44 


.317 



Lost 



56 



63 



65 



71 



73 



75 



95 



CHAMPIONSHIP WINNERS IN PREVIOUS YEARS. 

1903— Fort Wavne 645 1906— Grand Rapids 657 

1904— Fort Wayne 633 1907— Springfield 637 

1905— Wheeling 595| 

INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 
G. AB. R. H. SH.PC. I Name and Club. G. AB. R. H. SH.PC. 



Name and Club. 
Hoblitzel, Wh., 
French, Eva,., 
Conley, Zan., 
Wacker, Eva., 
Elston, F. W., 
Corns, F. W., 



53 185 25 66 
140 501 73 170 

36 78 10 26 

42 134 19 43 
134 514 79 163 

47 117 24 37 



.356 Knoll, Eva., 
.339 Baylies, Day., 



Bescher, Day., 

Wheeler, T. H., 

Kustus, Eva., 



140 506 85 157 
143 536 82 164 
122 455 73 139 
119 409 59 124 
140 518 80 153 



.310 
,306 
,305 
.303 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 
FIRST BASEMEN. 



Name and Club. 
Richardson, Day., 
Myers, Day., 



R. B. Kelly, S. B., 
Lloyd, Zan., 



Sheehan, S. B., 
McDermott, F. W., 

Darringer, Day., 
Lloyd, Zan., 



G. PO. A. E. PC. 

15 113 10 1000 
129 1181 70 11 .992 



Name and Club. 
Hayworth, S. B., 
Swartling, Zan., 

SECOND BASEMEN. 
50 3 3 lOOOlGrogan, Day., 
118 301 345 21 .969 1 Wheeler, T. H., 

THIRD BASEMEN. 
122 121 217 14 .964 I Walker, Day., 
72 103 131 11 .955JPendry, Zan., 

SHORTSTOPS. 
16 25 27 1 .989|Osteen, F. W., 
15 44 54 4 .9611Morse, Day., 



G. PO. A. E. 


PC. 


34 1371 84 22 
28 1328 96 15 


.990 
.990 


25 71 59 5 
92 240 226 37 


.963 
.962 


136 254 292 29 
74 103 167 18 


.949 
.938 



Salm, Wh., 60 69 

W. A.Kelly, GR.-FW. 114 241 



OUTFIELDERS. 

1000 1 Coffey, S. B., 
18 2 .993 j Knoll, Eva., 



Guyn, Zan., 
Rogers, Wh., 



PITCHERS. 

28 9 59 1 .986 1 Roberts, Wh., 
32 7 94 2 .981 j Johns, Day., 



134 202 374 33 .946 
17 30 43 5 .936 



131 279 16 2 .993 
140 281 23 3 .990 



12 3 35 1 .975 
32 14 59 2 .973 



CATCHERS. 



Name and Club. G.P.O. 
Kurke, S. B., 58 237 

Grefe, Eva., 24 80 



Name and Club. 
Wacker, Evansville .... 

Reiss, Evansville 

W. Miller, Fort Wayne 
Conley, Zanesville 



A. 


E.PB.PC. 


55 


5 


5 


.983 


28 


2 


3 


.982 



Name and Club. G.P.O. A. E.PB.PC. 

Clark, F. W., 85 445 100 11 10 .981 

Tieman, S. B., 



90 406 129 12 14 .980 



PITCHERS' RECORDS. 

AB. H. R. HB. BB. SO. WP. G. W. L. PC. 

.... 1031 224 76 15 73 175 1 37 27 8 .771 

.... 298 70 41 4 58 37 1 16 7 3 .700 

.... 337 81 38 2 30 34 5 10 6 3 .667 

.... 748 174 70 14 42 55 1 26 15 8 .652 




1, Walker; 2, Kelly; 3. Hartmann; 4, Myers, Mgr. ; 5, Chambers; 
6, Wessell; 7, Kessler: 8, Johns; 9, Kiser; 10, Ochs; 11, Bayless. 

DAYTON TEAM— CENTRAL LEAGUE. Miner, Photo. 




1, Elston; 2, Hendricks, Mgr.; 3, Hammond; 4, Osteen; 5, C. Alberts; 
6, Van Anda; 7, Dickey; 8, Miller; 9, Kelly; 10, Kempf; 11, 
Blount; 12, McDermott; 13. Reynolds; 14, Fremer; 15, Hendricks, Jr., 
Mascot. FORT WAYNE TEAM— CENTRAL LEAGUE. 




1, Geyer; 2, Green; 3, Warner: 4, More: 5, Murphy; (5, Lowe. Mgr.; 

7. Betts; 8, Bailey; 9, Francis; 10, Tobias; 11, Eubanks; 12, NoD- 

lett; 13, Sterzer; 14, Mascot. Miner. Photo, Fort Wayne. 

GRAND RAPIDS TEAM— CENTRAL LEAGUE. 




I, Cooperwinder ; 2, Swartling; 3, Miller; 4, Fisher; 5, Hastings; 6, 
Houtz; 7, M. Hogan, Mgr. ; 8, Kenworthy; 9, Shriver; 10, Nadeau; 

II, Connolly; 12, Wares; 13, Lloyd; 14, Pendry; 15, Tieyn. Miner, 

ZANE3VILLB TEAM — CENTRAL LEAGUE. Photo, 




1, Chill, Umpire: 2, West: 3, Williams; 4, Shafer; 5, Wheeler; 6, 
Douthett; 7, Collins; 8, Cooley; 9, Schreiber; 10, Drill, Mgr.; 11, 
Drohan; 12, DeHaven; 13, Groeshaw; 14, Cameron. 

TERRE HAUTE TEAM— CENTRAL LEAGUE. 




1, Huston; 2, Cariss; 3, Fleming, Mgr.; 4, Rogers; 5, Davis; 6, Asher; 

7, Roberts; 8, MiUer; 9, Jerger; 10, Spahr; 11, Wetzel; 12, Hoblitzel. 

WHEELING TEAM— CENTRAL LEAGUE. Miner, Photo. 




I, Ison; 2, Kanzler; 3, Sandherr; 4, Mackenzie; 5, Stinson; 6, Sparks; 
7, Sieber; 8, Revelle; 9, P. H. Lipe, Mgr.; 10, Pres. W. B. Bradley; 

II, Cowan; 12, Hefiron; 13, Bussey: 14, Messitt; 15, Kirkpatrick; 16, 
Quinn; 17, Titrnan. Foster, Photo. 

RICHMOND TEAM, CHAMPIONS VIRGINIA LEAGUE. 




1, Loos 
8, Doyle 
Thackar* 



2, Kline; 3, Walsh; 4, Steiner; 5, Henn; 6, Riggs; 7, Powell; 
; 9, Ryan; 10, Fisher; 11, Stafford, Mgr.; 12, Tydeman; 13, 
l; 14, Walker. Taylor, Photo. 

DANVILLE TEAM— VIRGINIA LEAGUE. 




^W), 



JO 



t*t 



fin rm^f ? 

Si 





1, Stoehr; 2, Otey; 3, Painter; 4, Kunkle; 5, McGhee; 6, McMahon, 

7, Shaffer, Capt. and Mgr.; 8, Reynolds; 9, Morrissey; 10, King; 11, 

Lohr; 12, Hessler. Copyright, 1908, by J. H. Kidd. 

ROANOKE TEAM— VIRGINIA LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 211 

Virginia League 

By Secretary E. N. Gregory, Jr., Richmond, Va. 

The third successful season of the Virginia Base Ball League 
came to a close on September 19, 1908, having opened on April 18. 
The league went through the season with no changes in the circuit, 
which is composed of Richmond, Norfolk, Portsmouth, Lynchburg, 
Roanoke and Danville, these being the six clubs that started in 
1906. 

Mr. Jake Wells of Richmond was reelected president of the 
league, and the other officers, as well as the board of directors, 
elected at the beginning of the first year, were all retained for the 
1908 season. 

While there was a decrease in the attendance as compared with 
the figures which were reported in former years, nevertheless the 
support accorded the clubs was in every respect satisfactory, and 
the league at the end of the season found itself on the same firm 
footing that it has occupied since its inception. Rainy days and 
cloudy weather interfered to quite an appreciable extent with the 
attendance in more than one city. 

The race for the pennant started on April 18, and the end of 
the first week found Richmond in the leading position. Danville, 
after a rather poor start, struck her gait and worked to second 
place, then began to push Richmond hard for the coveted position 
at the head of the column. On the twenty-fifth of May, Danville 
succeeded in taking away from Richmond the lead and in holding it 
for five days, but had to relinquish it to Norfolk — for one day only. 
Danville repossessed herself of the lead for just one day, only to 
find Portsmouth climbing over her to the top of the ladder. 

Portsmouth did not last long, however, and on June 8 Richmond 
again took up her position in the van. The middle and the latter 
part of June, and especially the early days of July, saw a close 
race between Danville and Richmond, both clubs playing swift 
ball, and both clubs began to draw away from the balance of the 
clubs in the race. Twice in early July did Danville succeed in 
going ahead of Richmond in the percentage column, but Richmond 
kept up a winning stride and on July 9 forged to the front, there 
to remain until the last game had been played. Danville still 
played a swift game and finished the race in the second place, 
with a handsome margin over the next competitor, who held third 
position practically throughout the season. Portsmouth finished 
in the fourth place. Norfolk playing fairly well in the beginning 
of the season, but about the middle of July she slumped badly, 
and during the last two months of the season Norfolk and Lynch- 
burg were crowding each other for the bottom place. When the 
season closed Norfolk was found to be the last on the list, with 
Lynchburg just six points above her. 

The ownership of the Lynchburg club was changed during the 
season, its owner, Jack Grim, who was also its manager, resigned 
from his position as manager and selling his interest in the club 
to a stock company organized in Lynchburg for the purpose of 
taking it over. With this exception, there were no changes in the 
ownership of any of the clubs. 

There were three no-hit games, ten one-hit games, twenty-three 
two-hit games and fifty-one three-hit games played during the 
season. 

The extra-inning games played were as follows : Nineteen tie 
games, fourteen 10-inning games, nine 11-inning games, eight 
12-inning games, two 13-inning games, three 14-inning games, one 
15-inning game, two 16-inning games. 





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1, Chas. T. Bland, l'res. : 2. J. B. Hoofnagle, Supt. Park; 3. Hamil- 
ton; 4, Hannatin; 5, Brennan; 6. Vail; 7. Guiheen; 8, Buckley; 9, 
Hallman; 10, Smith; 11. Wadleisrh: 12. Toner; 13. Lawrence, Capt. ; 
14, Hilbert; 15, Gnadinger; 16, Schrader; 17, M. Bland, Mascot; 18, 
Blllett. PORTSMOUTH TEAM— VIRGINIA LEAGUE. 




1, Jackson; 2, Verneuiller; 3, Schuman; 4, Stewart; 5, Armstrong: 6, 
Orth, Mgr.; 7, Raley; 8, Rath; 9, Byrd; 10, Westlake; 11, Bentlev; 
12, Bowen. LYNCHBURG TEAM— VIRGINIA LEAGUE. 




1, Chancellor; 2, Carroll; 3. Rvnders: 4. Bonner, Capt.; 5, Warner; 
6. Evans; 7, Edwards; 8, Savage; 9, Forbes; 10, Seitz; 11, Jackson; 
12, Ellinger; 13, Russell. 

NORFOLK TEAM— VIRGINIA LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



213 



The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders in 
Batting and Fielding in the Virginia League in 1908, accord- 
ing to the official records, are given herewith. The complete 
official records are published in Spalding's Official Base Ball 
Record, for sale by all newsdealers, price 10 cents. 



STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 

Rich. Dan. Roan. Ports. Lynch. Nor. Won 



Richmond 

Danville .'. 14 

Roanoke 6 

Portsmouth 4 

Lynchburg 11 

Norfolk 6 



18 
14 

13 
11 
11 



19 
12 
14 

12 

14 



17 
18 
17 
10 



18 
16 
13 
20 
11 



87 
74 
63 
57 
52 
52 



PO. 

.680 
.587 
.485 
.445 
.406 
.400 



Lost 



41 



52 



67 



71 



76 



78 



CHAMPIONSHIP WINNERS IN PREVIOUS YEARS. 



1906— Lynchburg . 



.666 11907— Norfolk 583 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 



Name and Club. 
Stinson, Ri., 
Orth, L., 
Forbes, N., 



G. AB. R. H.SH.PC. 

55 195 26 65 5 .333 
19 78 4 25 .321 
16 45 2 14 .311 



Name and Club. 
Quinn, Ri., 
Bentley, L., 
Henn, D., 



G.AB. R. H.SH.PC. 

17 51 8 15 4 .294 
50 151 11 44 4 .291 
115 403 58 117 14 .290 



Name and Club. 
Stafford, D., 
Raley, L., 



Bonner, N., 
Guiheen, P., 



Toner, P.-N., 
Lipe, Ri., 



Moss, L., 
Fisher, D., 



Tydeman, D., 

Edwards, N., 



Carter, P., 

Elliuger, N., 

Cowan, Ri., 
Ryan, D., 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 
FIRST BASEMEN. 
, G. PO. A. E. PC. I Name and Club. 
132 1367 103 19 .988 Schrader, P., 
124 1317 67 19 .986|Haas, N., 

SECOND BASEMEN. 

123 303 335 22 .967|McGhee, Ro., 
80 189 217 14 .967 1 Doyle, D., 

THIRD BASEMEN. 

75 90 177 12 .957|Rheinhart, D., 
136 165 247 20 .954 1 Painter, Ro., 

SHORTSTOPS. 

36 69 89 8 .9521 Warner, N., 
120 236 373 36 .944jSandherr, Ri., 



OUTFIELDERS. 

Ill 10 1.000 1 Evans, N., 
25 1 1.000 |Brodie, P.-N., 

PITCHERS. 

6 38 1.000 1 Reynolds, Ro., 
5 30 1.000 ISparks, Ri., 



G. 


PO 


A. 


E. 


PC. 


100 
81 


1051 
840 


52 
28 


15 
12 


.986 
.986 


50 
134 


82 
359 


128 
361 


8 

31 


.963 
.959 


126 
127 


167 
148 


311 
273 


31 
36 


.939 
.921 


48 

136 


101 
300 


159 
384 


17 

45 


.939 
.938 


10 
51 


19 
101 




7 



1 


1.000 
.991 



CATCHERS. 

62 329 92 5 .988|Messett, Ri., 
102 511 130 9 .986 1 Smith, N., 

PITCHERS' RECORDS. 



26 19 74 1 .989 
29 21 86 2 .981 



71 448 92 10 .982 
58 286 83 8 .979 



AB. H. 

Quinn, Richmond 534 102 

Walsh, Danville 1331 ?46 

McKenzie, Richmond 829 148 

Revell, Richmond 1208 222 



Opponents- 
R. 

25 



49 

77 



BB. SO. WP. W. 

20 92 4 14 

94 194 5 30 

39 119 4 18 

69 199 3 26 



PC. 

1.000 
.769 
.750 
.684 




1, J. H. Mooney, President Binghamton: 2, E. J. Coleman, Presi- 
dent Scranton; 3, George N. Kuntzsch, President Syracuse: 4, C. M. 
Winchester, Jr., President Albany: 5. M. S. Roach. Manager Bing- 
hamton; 6, W. H. Rabbett, President Troy; 7, John J. O'Brien, 
Manager Troy; 8, T. C. Griffin, Manager Syracuse; 9, Charles 
Dooley. Manager Utica. 
A GROUP OP NEW YORK STATE LEAGUE CLUB OFFICIALS. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 215 

New York State League 

By J. £. Kern, Scranton, Pa. 

From a playing standpoint, the season of the New York State 
League, which was brought to a conclusion on Sunday, September 
20, 1908, was perhaps the most successful in the history of the 
organization. The close of the season saw eight well-balanced teams 
contending, and although Scranton won the championship, with a 
lead of fifty-five points, this margin was not due to the weakness 
of the opposition so much as to the. exceptional strength of the 
Miners, who proved to be a stronger aggregation, perhaps, than any 
other State League team had ever been able to place in the field. 

The assembling of such a winning nine was due first to the 
liberality of the Scranton club owner, Mr. Edward J. Coleman, and 
second to the experience and wide acquaintance among ball players 
of Manager Malachi Kittredge. It was the purpose of owner Cole- 
man to show the people oi this city that he would provide a winner 
for them without regard to expense, and that his intention was to 
place true sportsmanship above the ticket office showing. For that 
reason Manager Kittredge was given carte blanche in the selection 
of his team. Players were brought here from major leagues . and 
paid the same salaries throughout the season that they would have 
received in faster company. This was the sort of enterprise that 
landed Scranton a winner in 1908, despite the strenuous efforts to 
defeat her that were made by Binghamton, Trov and at one time 
Utica. 

Although Scranton, toward the close of the season, secured a long 
lead, up to September the championship remained very much in 
doubt, adding to the interest. As on the previous season", Bingham- 
ton secured a great start, winning a number of straight games and 
assuming first position in' the club standing. During the last week 
of May Utica spurted, passed both Scranton and Binghamton, and 
assumed the lead. It was able to hold this for only a few days as-. 
Scranton was going a very rapid stride and the close of the montht 
saw the Miners in the lead with Binghamton second and Utica 
third. 

• Practically, there was no change in the positions of the teams 
during June. Troy, which, it will be noticed, was strong at the 
finish, made a bad start, met with various phases of bad luck, and 
disappointed all its friends. Binghamton looked strong, but was* 
at times erratic, and because of that lost several opportunities to 
displace Scranton. Utica was very fast in the field and on the 
bases and really developed all the Base Ball talent that it pos- 
sessed. It was too weak with the stick, however, to win stellar 
honors, and after its final spurt in August it dropped out of the 
running and showed that it would be satisfied with a position in 
the first division. 

The old A. J. & G. team, that was humorously known to all fol- 
lowers of Base Ball as "The Jags," begun the season under the 
management of Lew Bacon as the J. & G. nine, Amsterdam being 
dropped because of a disposition to show the white feather. Mana- 
ger Bacon, during his short stay in the league, had what might 
be considered a stormy career. His players combined against him 
and sulked. When he disposed of some of the best of them through 
trades, to obtain a winning aggregation, he secured gold bricks. In 
July his nine having proved its inability to win a game, even 
through accident, the league took a hand, and the team was trans- 
ferred to Elmira under the management of the veteran Hank 
Ramsey. 




1, Robertson: 2, Graham; 3, Zeimer, Capt. ; 4, Beckendorf; 5, Kitt- 
redge, Mgr. ; G, Houser; 7, Kellogg; 8, Owner Coleman; 9, Steele; 10, 
Ely; 11, Schnltz; 12. Moran; 13, Mitinger; 14, Grob; 15, Bills. 
SCRANTON TEAM, CHAMPIONS NEW YORK LEAGUE. 

Hornbaker, Photo. 




1, Hope; 2, Wagner; 3, Raftus; 4, McGamwell; 5. Pappalau; 6, 
Shaw; 7, Kane; 8, Roach, Bus. Mgr.; 9, Herrington; 10, Kirk; 11, G. 
Bannon; 12, Pardee; 13, J. Bannon, Mgr. -Capt. ; 14, Parkins; 15, 
Cooney; 16, Marcan; 17, J. H. Mooney, Pres. ; 18, Sullivan; 19, 
Garry; 20, Swayne. Copyrighted, 1908. by Newing. 

BINGHAMTON TEAM— NEW YORK LEAGUE. 




1, Chas. L. Dooley, Mgr.; 2, Bun-ell; 3, Madden: 4, Carroll; 5, Col- 
lins; 6, O'Hara; 7, Ryan; S, O'Connor; 9, Earley; 10, Doyle; 11, 
Steelman; 12, Kennedy. Capt.: 13. Egan: 14, Polchow; 15, Hartman. 
UTICA TEAM— NEW YORK LEAGUE. Frey, Photo. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 217 

From the very hour that he assumed charge. Mr. Ramsey infused 
new life in the "team. ^SYith what few cast-off players he was able 
to obtain he pulled off victory after victory, and promises a winner 
for Elmira the coming season. This was the only change made in 
league clubs during 1908, one other team, Wilkes-Barre, changing 
its manager in the middle of the season. Abe Lezotte had been 
unable to collect a winning aggregation for Wilkes-Barre. Internal 
dissensions and dissatisfaction with the town caused some of the 
best of his men to sulk. About the middle of the season he was 
relieved of authority and Dr. Robert D'rury of Binghamton appointed 
to the berth. He was not able to do much for the team, which 
played erratically throughout, winning some brilliant victories and 
throwing away many games by sloppy work. 

Albany, the pennant winner of the previous year, which started 
the season with many of its old players, was unable to strike its 
stride and was never dangerous. Captain-Manager Doherty's great 
weakness was lack of a first baseman. To fill that vacancy he 
swung Ingerton over from third, weakening two positions to fill 
one indifferently. Late in the season, through the acquisition of 
Snyder, he was able to send Ingerton back to the warm corner and 
to give strength to his nine, but his opportunity was gone and the 
finish was far from creditable. 

It was during July that some of the teams that had started 
badly began to show form. Troy forged rapidly to the front with 
a long string of victories, and for the same reason Syracuse began 
to be feared by the other organizations. But they had struck their 
stride too late, and had too formidable an opponent in Scranton. 

The season of the Scranton championship team was somewhat 
remarkable owing to the number of mishaps that the team encoun- 
tered. To win a pennant under such circumstances became a 
matter of difficulty. It was accomplished by Manager Kittredge 
through securing Robertson from Nashville, and through playing 
Bills, a pitcher, in all the infield positions as well as in the outfield. 
It was after the injured players had returned to their places late 
in the season that Scranton made its runaway race for the bunting. 

But the liberality of Mr. Coleman and Manager Kittredge's genius 
for selecting capable men would have gone for naught but for the 
good work at all times of Captain Gus Zeimer, whose handling of 
the men on the field was admirable, calling forth the remark from 
Manager Kittredge that for inside Base Ball Zeimer was one of the 
best men that he had ever met in the minor leagues. Scranton's 
appreciation of Zeimer is shown in his selection as manager for the 
team for the season of 1909. 

The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders in 
Batting and Fielding in the New York State League in 1908, accord- 
ing to the official records, are given herewith. The complete 
official records are published in Spalding's Official Base Ball 
Record,, for sale by all newsdealers, price 10 cents. 

STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 

Club. Scr. Bin. Troy. Syr. Utica. Al. Wilk. Elm. Won. PC. 

Scranton 8 12 12 13 8 14 17 84 .622 

Binghamton 10 .. 32 10 11 11 12 14 80 .567 

Trov 5 7 .. 11 9 18 14 14 78 .561 

Syracuse 7 13 9 .. 11 9 10 17 76 .543 

Utica 6 10 5 8 .. 12 14 19 74 .536 

Albany 11 10 13 10 7 .. 8 8 67 .479 

Wilkesbarre 8 8 5 8 7 9 .. 15 60 .435 

Elmira 4 5 5 5 6. .6 5 .. 36 .257 

Lost 51 61 61 64 64 73 77 104 




K l, Washburn; 2, Hollis; 3, Works; 4, Crisham, Capt.; 5, T. C. 
'Griffin, Yice-Pres. and Mgr. ; 6, Hooper; 7, Hillinger; 8, Heck; 9, 
Ennis; 10, Trainer; 11, Helmund; 12, Preston; 13, Nores; 14, Fifield; 
15, Shea; 16, Carr. Smith & Holmes, Photo. 

SYRACUSE TEAM— NEW YORK LEAGUE. 







■ ffc3 fc 



...._ -^.. 




1, W T eeks; 2, Essenter; 3, Hillinger; 4, Keys; 5, Lawlor, Capt.; 6, 
Kirk; 7, Bowen; 8, Jarrett; 9, Shulze; 10, Therre; 11, Stroh; 12, 
H. D. Ramsey, Mgr.; 13, Esmond; 14, Granelli; 15. Peartree. 
ELMIRA TEAM— NEW YORK LEAGUE. 




1, Lauterborn; 2, McDougall; 3, Bridges; 4, Grubb; 5, Hues; 6, 
Swift; 7, Gilbert; 8, J. S. Monks, Pres. ; 9, A. Featherstone, Dir.; 
10, W. Drury, Mgr.; 11, Leard; 12, Miller; 13, Delehanty; 14, A. 
Featherstone, Mascot: 15, Lee. 

WILKES-BARRE TEAM— NEW YORK LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



219 



Club. 



CHAMPIONSHIP WINNERS IN PREVIOUS YEARS. 

1897— Canandaigua 602 1903— Schenectady 

1898— Canandaiirua 618! 1904— Syracuse 

1899— Rome 794 1905— A. J. & G. 

1900— Utica 633,1906— Scranton .. 

1901— Albany 626 1 1907— Albany .... 

1902— Albany 63S 1 

INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 



.606 
.674 
.590 
.631 

.612 



Name and Club. G. AB. R. 1B.SH.PC 
Killingsworth. Al. 2S 78 6 26 1 .33: 
Lawlor. Elmira, 113 276 34 91 15 



McCormick. Syr., 
Howard, Scr., 



222 31 

S2 



10 .324 



Name and Club. 
Houser, Scranton. 
Crisham, Syracuse, 

■Gatirs, Troy. 
Lauterborn, Wilk., 

Ingerton. Albany, 
Carr, Syracuse, 

Aubrey, Syracuse, 
Tamsett, Albany, 

Schrall, r.f., Alb., 
Garry, c.f., Bing., 

Cunningham, Troy, 
Schultz, Scranton, 

•Clark, Syracuse, 
Kittridge, Scranton, 



Name and Club. G.-AB. R. 1B.SH.PC. 

Goode, Troy, 139 502 79 153 15 .305 

Miller, Wil., 92 306 32 93 7 .304 

Madden, Utica, 127 460 71 139 28 .302 

Kennedy, Utica, 137 483 68 143 21 .296 

INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 

FIRST BASEMEN. 

G. PO. A. E. PC.f Name and Club. G. PO. A. E. PC. 

123 1179 75 12 .991 McGamwell, Bing., 126 1302 57 20 .985 

139 1371 74 22 .986'DaTis, Wilks., 95 978 68 21 .980 

SECOND BASEMEN. 
128 445 338 30 .963|Dohertv, Albany, 144 464 377 41 .954 

61 169 140 12 .962JShortell, Syracuse, 86 193 239 22 .951 

THIRD BASEMEN. 
134 626 205 37 .957|Burrill. Utica, 142 187 339 37 .934 

131 157 173 15 .956|Madigan, Scranton, 83 147 120 20 .930 

SHORTSTOPS. 
128 255 415 39 .945 iL. Hartman. Utica, 40 92 140 14 .943 
144 324 496 49 .944iMarcan, Bing., 133 358 514 55 .941 

OUTFIELDERS. 

lOOOjMagie, c.f., Alb., 

1 .994|Fogarty, r.f., Wilk., 
PITCHERS. 

1000 (O'Connor, Utica, 

1 .990 [Steele, Scranton, 
CATCHERS. 

2 .994|.3hea, Syracuse, 86 411 111 9 .984 
1 .993ITherre, Elmira, 34 145 61 4 .981 



131 155 
68 152 


7 

7 


15 5 
40 17 


23 

82 


55 274 
22 114 


69 

34 



144 420 
28 63 



26 
20 




1, Pagles: 2, Ness; 3, D. Williams, Mgr. ; 4. Murray: 5, Pratt; 6, 
Brandt: 7. A. Williams: S, Koenping; 9, Hanev; 10, Baker; 11, 
Guchnow, Mgr.; 12, O'Brien; 13, Krick; 14, Thorson. 

DULUTH TEAM— NORTHERN LEAGUE. 




1, Selby; 2, Dick Cooley, Mgr.; 3, Boles; 4, Hagerman; 5. Root; 6, 
Baird; 7, Hendrix; 8, Abbott; 9, Andrews; 10, Davis; 11, Roach; 12, 
Bartley; 13, Wooley; 14, Cole; 15, Nagel; 16, S. Olson; 17, E. Olso"*, 
18, Brennan. 

TOPEKA TEAM, CHAMPIONS WESTERN ASSOCIATION. 




1, Pettigrew; 2, C. Middleton; 3, Millsap; 4, Speer; 5. Clarke; 6, 
Quiesser; 7, Plank; 8, Hetling; 9, Armstrong; 10. Miller: 11. Hol- 
land, Mgr.; 12, Scott; 13, Annis; 14, Bolin; 15, R. Middleton; 16, 
Pennell. WICHITA TEAM— WESTERN ASSOCIATION. 



f 

-' 7 • 

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15 








w 



1, Selky; 2, Hurlburt, Capt. ; 3, Ashley; 4, McGill; 5, Frantz; 6, 
Jones; 7, Geist; S, Farrel; 9, Osborn; 10, Morgan; 11, W. J. Kimmel; 
12, Cobb; 13, Griff; 14, Queisser; 15. Newman: 16, Frost; 17, Weis- 
senger; 18, Handcock. Copyright. 1908, by Vreeland Studio. 

ENID TEAM— WESTERN ASSOCIATION. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 221 

Western Association 

By President D. M. Shively 

Many changes in its circuit have been the order of the winter 
season in the Western Association this year. The fondest hope of 
the fans in Wichita and Topeka (to become a part of the circuit 
of the Western League) has been realized, and next season will 
find the two largest cities in Kansas included in that organization. 
The change.wilUbe valuable to the Western League, and may prove 
just as important to the Western Association. It will at least 
greatly reduce the mileage in the Western Association, and the 
remaining clubs in this organization it is believed will be able to 
observe better their salary limit. 

The sale of Topeka and Wichita to the Western League necessi- 
tated the dropping of Hutchinson, as the city was too remote from 
the circuit to justify the other clubs in making the jump. The 
Hutchinson club had been a loyal member of the league, and it was 
with regret that it was lost. 

The Western Association has long been recognized as one of the 
strong Class "C" organizations. Many reforms have been outlined 
for the coming season, and an effort will be made to conduct the 
league on a more economic and paying basis. 

To fill the places of Topeka, Wichita and Hutchinson franchises 
have been voted to Muskogee, Bartlesville and Pittsburg. These 
cities lie directly in the path of the jump from Springfield, Joplin 
and Webb City to Oklahoma City and Enid, and the mileage will 
be greatly reduced. Clubs have prospered in all of these cities in 
past years, and the Western Association owners believe that clubs 
will be successful in them in the future. 

"Dick" Cooley and his band of Topeka "White Sox" were given 
a stiff argument in the closing days of the pennant race last season, 
but they finally won by capturing" one game out of the last three at 
Wichita and one at Hutchinson. "Rip" Qagerman, who was pur- 
chased by Chicago, helped to land Cooley's band first. Wichita 
finished a good second, while Oklahoma City was third and Joplin 
fourth. Hutchinson, Webb City, Springfield and Enid finished in 
the second division in that order. 

Among the reforms adopted for the season of 1909 is the increase 
of the guarantee fund from $300 to $500. The failure by any club 
to observe all of the conditions of the league constitution, or the 
playing rules, makes this guarantee subject to forfeiture with the 
franchise and players. 

Another important rule adopted is in the interest of discipline. 
According to its terms no club will be allowed to pay any player's 
fine, and when a player is ejected from a game he will not be 
allowed to play again or draw pay for three days. An anti-farming 
rule was adopted also, and no club will be allowed to use players 
on optional agreements or transfer any players on that basis. 

No club can, according to the terms of the league agreement, 
enter a contract that calls for more than $125. 

The championship season will begin May 1, and close Septem- 
ber 3. 

The managerial reins this year will be in the following hands : 
Oklahoma City, Lawrence Milton ; Muskogee, George Dalrymple ; 
Bartlesville, Frank L. Barber ; Pittsburg, T. C. Hayden ; Joplin, 
"Tony" Vanderhill ; Webb City, "Joe" McClure, and Springfield, 
Frank Hurlburt. 

The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders in 
Batting and Fielding in the Western Association in 1908, accord- 




1, Erloff: 2, Tonneman: 3, Grady; 4. Gray; 5. Smith; 6. Kunkle; 7, 
Wilson. Ca.pt.; 8. Hulburt. Mgr.; 9. Ellis; 10, Dalrymple; 11, Bren- 
nan; 12, Kaufman; 13, Merideth; 14, Karsten. 

SPRINGFIELD TEAM— WESTERN ASSOCIATION. 




1, D. G. Cooley; 2, J. F. Sinister, Umpire: 3, Robert Kerr; 4. R. D. 
Johnson: 5. Chas. Garnett: 6. Frank Iscell: 7. Lawrence Milton: 8* 
Frank Hurlburt: 9. R. E. Moist; 10, A. J. Baker; 11, D. M. Shivelv; 
12, W. J. Kimmel. Hebard, Photo* 

A GROUP OF WESTERN ASSOCIATION MAGNATES. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



223 



ing to the official records, are given herewith. The complete 
official records are published in Spalding's Official Base Ball 
Record, for sale by all newsdealers, price 10 cents. 



STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 



Club. 



Topeka 

Wichita 11 

Oklahoma City . . 9 

Joplm 3 

Hutchinson 8 

Webb City 11 

Springfield 3 

Enid 5 



Lost 



50 



53 



10 


d uy. 
16 


12 


9 


apgu 
16 


ma. 

15 


v\ on. 

83 


LOSt. 

50 


.638 


11 


8 


12 


15 


14 


16 


87 


53 


.621 




12 


10 


12 


14 


16 


82 


58 


.586 


8 




9 


9 


13 


18 


72 


65 


.525 


10 


11 




11 


9 


13 


70 


69 


.504 


8 


10 


8 




11 


11 


64 


70 


.471 


6 


7 


11 


8 




9 


50 


87 


.365 


4 


1 


7 


8 


io 




39 


98 


.285 



58 



69 



S7 



CHAMPIONSHIP WINNERS IN PREVIOUS YEARS. 

1902*— Nevada 702 1905— Wichita 585 

1903*— Sedalia 739 1906— Topeka 594 

1904 — Iola 670,1907— Wichita 737 

* Missouri Valley League. 



Name and Club. 
Wilson. Spr., 
Hetling. Wic. 
Porkorney, W.C. 



BATTING. 

Name and Club. G. AB. R. 1B.SH.PC. 
93 323 42 104 6 .322' Andrews. To.-Hu. 116 406 43 121 18 .298 
140 512 73 163 30 .318 Love, O.C.. 127 457 69 134 13 .293 

117 477 51 144 6 .302|Queisser, Wic, 29 75 11 22 5 .293 



INDIVIDUAL 
G. AB. R. 1B.SH.PC; 



Name and Club. 
Cooley. Topeka. 
Cuthbert. W. City, 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 

FIRST BASEMEN. 

G. PO. A. E. PC. Name and Club. 

56 552 24 3 .903 Abbott. Topeka, 

35 368 11 3 .992 Wright, W.C. -Enid, 



G. PO. A. E. PC. 
60 650 41 8 .989 

87 836 57 12 .9S7 



Olson, Topeka. 
Wanner. Joplin, 



Fillmar. 
Kunkle. Spring., 



SECOND BASEMEN. 
95 246 323 13 .97S Stofer. Hutch., 
140 458 349 29 .965|Love, Ok. City, 

THIRD BASEMEN. 
103 137 217 10 .978(Rtmkle. Enid. 
75 95 171 20 .930|Everhart, W.C.-O.C. 



35 56 S9 7 .934 
127 29S 378 36 .949 



119 170 280 24 .928 
117 163 351 42 .924 



W. White. Ok. City, 
Olson, Hutch., 



Corkill.. Joplin. 
Miller, Wichita, 



Doran. Wich.. 
Armstrong, Wich., 



Downey. W. City, 
Morgan, Enid, 



SHORTSTOPS. 
134 234 424 50 .929 W. Frantz. Enid, 
140 320 425 57 .929. Jones, Enid, 

OUTFIELDERS. 
48 107 13 1000'Lawler, Spring., 
23 31 3 lOOOlMiddleton, Wich., 

CATCHERS. 
25 183 28 4 .9S2!Haas. Hutch.. 
115 708 131 16 .980IBartley, Top.-Enid., 

PITCHERS. 

10 3 18 1000]Sheldon, Enid, 

11 5 59 1090! Barber, Hutch., 



39 79 119 16 .925 
50 84 140 19 .922 



23 25 1 1000 
126 319 19 5 .985 



53 238 54 6 .980 
45 229 42 7 .978 



14 10 38 1000 
35 29 59 1 .989 




1, C. E. Howar, President Oskaloosa; 2, Hugh Hill, President Ke- 
wanee: 3, E. F. Egan, President Burlington; 4, Harry F. Hofer, 
Manager Quincy; 5, E. E. Fleming, Manager Ottumwa; 6, Frank 
Boyle, Manager Waterloo. 

A GROUP OF CENTRAL ASSOCIATION CLUB OFFICIALS. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 225 

Central Association 

(Formerly Iowa State.) 

By John A. Hall, Quincy, 111. 

The Central Association, familiarly and affectionately known 
by its organizers and many of its staunchest supporters by the 
old appellation of Iowa State League, kept pace with the gen- 
eral Base Ball prosperity of the season of 1908, and despite 
many obstacles and considerable internal strife in the arrange- 
ment of the circuit at the outset of the year, finished the season 
intact and with practically all of the component parts of the 
league in a flourishing condition. 

Far in excess of the advance of the league in the matter of 
finances or attendance, however, was the increased effectiveness 
of the organization and the greater standing secured generally 
in Base Ball circles. With the raising of the salary limit of 
the league came the accompanying elevation of the playing 
standard of the clubs composing the organization, with the 
natural and corresponding uplifting of the interest in the 
games played and the increased support of the league by the 
public in general. Greater and wider prestige was also attained 
through the showing made by Central Association teams when 
pitted against clubs from higher class organizations, both before 
and after the playing season. 

In drawing power, the season exceeded the previous one by 
over 12,000, for which Quincy was largely responsible, ably 
seconded by Keokuk, aided somewhat by Waterloo. These three 
cities made up the heavy losses in some of the other cities and 
added a little thereto. Quincy alone increased the figures of 
1907 by nearly 18,000, or almost 150 per cent of the entire 
increase of the league for the year. Keokuk gained over 11,000 
and Waterloo, by having a winning team throughout the entire 
season and a close race for the lead with Burlington, increased 
its previous year's attendance by almost 5,000. The most not- 
able fall in attendance was that of Burlington, where disap- 
pointment over the failure, two years in succession, to land a 
pennant after having once won, resulted in the killing of the 
interest, and the final games in that city were played almost 
to empty benches, despite the fact that the team was in second 
place and had been a contender at all stages of the game dur- 
ing the entire season. At one time, not long before the close 
of the season, Burlington had held the lead for a short period, 
and the taste of leading honors was so sweet to Burlington 
fans that the resentment w T as all the more bitter when the 
sweets were snatched away by Waterloo, w T hich club had been 
surfeited on the plum all season. 

The high salaries shoals, on which have been wrecked many a 
promising minor league, have been avoided in the Central by 
the activity of President Justice, who has felt that a strict 
observance of this clause in the constitution was the salvation 
of the league, and in order to assure himself of the fact that 
this rule was respected, an auditor was sent around the circuit 
to inspect the books of the local associations, in order that no 
equivocation might be indulged in regarding the amount of the 
salaries paid. 

One of the surest proofs of the high class of the playing in 
the Central is the large number of players sold or drafted to 
higher organizations, probably a greater percentage this year 
than any other minor league club in Class D. 




1, Searls; 2, Glockner; 3, Petersen; 4, Lewis: 5, Cruikshank; 
Foster; 7, Lizette; 8, Damn: 9. Gaspar; 10, Curtis; 11, Schopp; 12, 
Magee; 13, Pennington; 14, Pres. Junge; 15, Boyle, Mgr. ; 16. Sec. 
Rath; 17, Kruger. Tritz, Photo. 

WATERLOO (IOWA) TEAM, CHAMPIONS CENTRAL ASSO- 
CIATION. 




1, Bruggeman; 2, Cosgrove; 3, Yant; 4, Egan, Mgr.; 5, Rose; 6, 
Burg; 7, Eis; 8, Breyette; 9, Schroeder; 10, Boyd; 11, Halstrom; 12, 
House; 13, Donovan, Capt. 

BURLINGTON TEAM— CENTRAL ASSOCIATION. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



227 



The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders in 
Batting and Fielding in the Central Association in 1908, accord- 
ing to the official records, are given herewith. The complete 
official records are published in Spalding's Official Base Ball 
Record, for sale by all newsdealers, price 10 cents. 



STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON 
Clubs. Wat.Bur. Qy. Kk. Jx. Osk.Kw. Ott. P. 



Waterloo 

Burlington 5 

Quincy 6 

Keokuk 5 

Jacksonville 6 

Oskaloosa 8 

Kewanee 3 

Ottumwa 6 



13 
12 

'i 

7 

9 



10 
14 



11 16 
15 12 
11 11 



11 
10 



125 
124 
128 
125 
123 
126 
127 
128 



W. L. 

88 37 

83 41 

73 55 

57 68 

56 69 

51 75 

48 79 



PC. 

.704 
.670 
.570 
.456 
.448 
.405 
.378 
.375 



Lost 



37 41 56 



75 79 80 



CHAMPIONSHIP TEAMS IN PREVIOUS YEARS. 



1904— Ottumwa 
1905— Ottumwa 



.65711906— Burlington 681 

.613 1 1907— Waterloo 637 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 



Name and Club. 
Holstrom, Bur., 
House, Burlington, 
Rose, Burlington, 
Swalm, Waterloo, 



G. AB.R. H. PC. 

41 120 25 44 .367 
112 447 72 137 .306 
122 483 73 146 .302 

28 73 4 22 .301 



Name and Club. 
Breyette, Bur., 
Mertens, Quincy, 
Cannon, Jack., 



G. AB.R. H. PC. 

113 438 72 129 .294 
113 416 54 121 .291 
27 79 12 23 .291 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 
FIRST BASEMEN. 
Name and Club. G. PO. A. E. PC. I Name and Club. G. PO. 
Rose, B., 88 895 33 13 .986 Spooner, B., 

Corbett, Ot., 23 175 8 3 .984lFisher, J.-Kew., 



17 178 
89 819 



PC. 

.984 



Magee, W., 
Rebscher, Kew., 



Donovan, B., 
Evans, Os., 

Berte, J., 
Breyette, B., 

Hofer, Q., 

H. Finney, Ot., 



Swalm, W., 
Schroeder, B., 



Lizette, W., 
Searles, W., 



SECOND BASEMEN. 

125 317 316 28 .958|Yeager, Q., 
41 92 101 9 .955JLittlejohn, J., 

THIRD BASEMEN. 

110 164 228 28 .9331 Lemon, Kuk., 
46 88 96 15 .925|McGuire, Q., 

SHORTSTOPS. 

125 249 364 36 .945 IP. Burg, Kew., 
113 201 336 34 .941 1 Hill, Kuk., 



129 355 303 33 
40 114 109 13 



110 156 264 36 



124 255 335 44 

126 277 352 59 



.952 
.945 



.921 
.921 



.931 
.914 



16 19 
43 73 



26 

25 



OUTFIELDERS. 
1.000 ICrossley, J., 
8 1 .988|Murphy, Os., 

PITCHERS. 

i3 1 .990|Keyes, Q., 
17 1 .986 1 Green, B., 



36 
17 



CATCHERS. 

86 467 98 4 .991|Belt, Kuk., 
47 281 57 4 .988|Mier, Q., 

PITCHERS' RECORDS. 



AB. 



H. 

Gasper, Waterloo 1239 199 

Spencer, Burlington 539 112 

Eis, Burlington 1217 237 103 12 

Slapnicka, Burlington 473 86 34 14 



R. HB. BB. 

64 16 33 

40 2 21 

31 

36 



74 352 96 8 

92 487 118 12 

SO. WP. W. L. 

217 3 32 4 

74 3 11 3 

176 5 23 10 

43 2 9 4 



.980 
.980 



.982 
.981 



PC. 

.889 
.786 
.697 
.692 




1, Keyes; 2, Linderbeck; 3, Mortens; 4, Bennett: 5, Mier; 6, Yaeger; 
7, Rudd. Capt.; 8, Hofer, Mgr.; 9, Prater; 10, Dang; 11, Walsh; 12, 
Dal ton; 13, Horn: 14, McGuire; 15, Mascot. 

QUINCY TEAM— CENTRAL ASSOCIATION. 




1, Miller; 2, Prough; 3, Burch; 4, Roland; 5, Whisman; 6, Bramble; 
7, Wilson; S, Corridon; 9, Behringer; 10, Belt, Mgr. ; 11, Reichle; 
12, Carroll; 13, Lemon; 14, Sterne, Mascot; 15, Hill. 

KEOKUK TEAM— CENTRAL ASSOCIATION. 



ilR ■■;-:■ II 
1 1 


fflr" ^s^^I^BhI ^y| i * 


>*^« k* 



1, Gray; 2, Patrick; 3, Roland; 4, Townsend: 5, Johnson: 6, Keeler; 
7, McCarthy; 8, Hughes; 9, Crossley: 10. O'Hearn; 11. Blausser; 12, 
Meloan; 13, Morris; 14. Jacoby: 15, Berte, Mgr.; 16, Cannon. 
^ JACKSONVILLE TEAM— CENTRAL ASSOCIATION. 





B> am O 






r^> L % 


1 S&Wjfcl-OaJ 


WPS 










^Er^cSi 



1, Giffin; 2, Dowers; 3, Sevier; 4, Coates; 5, Moody; 6, Evans; 7, 
Forney; 8, Everett; 9, Ritzman; 10, McKinney; 11, Kensel, Mgr. ; 12, 
Richmond, Mascot; 13, Harris. 

OSKALOOSA TEAM— CENTRAL ASSOCIATION. 




1, Wagner; 2, Noe; 3, Stevenson, Mgr.; 4, Pressey; 5, Callahan; 6, 
Lewis; 7, Fisher: 8, P. Burg; 9, Johnson; 10, Crandall; 11, Copeland; 
12, Lage; 13, Hodge. 

KEWANEE TEAM— CENTRAL. ASSOCIATION. 




1, Corbett; 2, Cavanaugh; 3. E. Fleming, Mgr.; 4, Cady; 5, Washer; 

6, Simons; 7, Berger; 8. Zackert; 9, Dorrance: 10, Volk; 11, F. 

Finney; 12, Hartman: 13. C. Fleming: 14, Plvmpton. Packwood, 

OTTUMWA TEAM— CENTRAL ASSOCIATION. Photo. 




1, A. S. Burkhart, Saginaw Club, Southern Michigan League; 2, J. 
A. Elliott, Lacrosse Club, Wisconsin-Illinois League; 3, W. R. Bryan, 
President Wausau Club, Wisconsin-Illinois League; 4, A. J. Baker, 
President Joplin Club, Western Association: 5. Geo. K. Kline. Presi- 
dent Johnstown Club, Tri-State League; 6, B. L. Hough, Manager- 
Hannibal Club, Illinois-Missouri League; 7, J. M. Fox, President. 
Canton Club, Illinois-Missouri League; 8, Fred. McDaniels, Bartles- 
ville Club, Oklahoma and Kansas League; 9, W. L. Tull, Presi- 
dent Muskogee Club, Oklahoma and Kansas League. 

A GROUP OF MINOR LEAGUE CLUB OFFICIALS. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GLIDE. 



231 



Southern Michigan League 

By President Joe S, Jackson 

In its third season, that of 1908, the Southern Michigan Asso- 
ciation gained the greatest measure of success of its career. With 
an eight club circuit, it went through the season without at any 
time being in danger of loss of any city, its only trouble being at 
Bay City. There, in mid-season, an individual ownership was suc- 
ceeded by that of an association of local lovers of the game, 
greatly strengthening the league's position in the town. The club 
finished last, but was strong financially and well fitted for the 
start of a new season. 

With a single exception.' the circuit for 1908 was the same as 
that for 1907. Saginaw was admitted in place of Mt. Clemens, 
whose franchise was transferred at the league's winter meeting. 
tThe change was deemed advisable, as Saginaw, in addition to being 
right on the circuit existing in 1907. is the third largest city of 
the State, being exceeded in population only by Detroit, a major 
League town, and Grand Rapids, a Central League franchise holder. 

Oddly enough, the one new member of the league was the city 
to win' the pennant. Saginaw had a very strong club, and won 
out in a race that was well contested at all times, and in which 
Kalamazoo was always threatening. The other clubs had vary- 
ing experiences, there never being a time when any club, with the 
exception of the unfortunate Bay City aggregation, had any assur- 
ance of the position that it would occupy at the finish. Tecumseh, 
winner of the flag one year earlier, was fourth at the finish. This 



^M| 








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Rfl HjlfUByr 



1. Neuschafer; 2, Gough; 3, White; 4. Miller; 5, Kusel; 6, McCul 
lough: 7. Derringer; S, Green; 9. Burkart; 10. Smith; 11, Dr. Crane 
12. Cadman; 13, Sharp; 14. Thomas; 15, Ragan; 16. Ehlers; 17, CheiS' 
man; IS, Woodmancy; 19, Eberts. Daines & Sanford, Photo, 

SAGINAW TEAM, CHAMPIONS SOUTHERN MICHIGAN LEAGUE 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



233 




I, Treas. Fisher; 2, iSomerlott ; o, Doty; 4, Wagner, Mgr. ; 5, league; 
6, Gosshorn; 7, Sec. Pocklington ; 8, Holmquist; 9, Fox; 10, Streeter; 

II, Pres. Hessen; 12, Mitchell; 13, Vorpagel; 14, Shippy; 15, Hodges, 
Mascot. 

TECUMSEH TEAM— SOUTHERN MICHIGAN LEAGUE. 

town, one of the original members of the circuit, will not have a 
team in 1909, its franchise having been transferred to Adrian, 
which had the strongest independent team in the State last season. 
As in 1908, it will be an eight club circuit, the only change 
being the one indicated. The league will continue as a Class D 
circuit, and its magnates believe that it is one of the best, as well 
as one of the biggest, organizations playing ball under this class- 
ification. Undoubtedly it has the most compact circuit of any 
professional league of any note in the country. From one extreme 
to the other, Bay City to Kalamazoo, the distance — railroad mile- 
age, not air line — is 182 miles. There is not a sleeper jump, of 
course. Several can be made on interurban trolley, and nearly all 
can be made from the home town to the road town on the day of 
a game. 




1, H. Taylor; 2, Waterman; 3, Hale; 4, Bell, Capt.; 5, Sage; 6, 
Furlong; 7, Andrews; 8, H. Frank, Sec: 9, Steimle: 10, Method; 11, 
J. Frank, Pres.; 12, Cote; 14, E. Taylor; 15, Kelly. 

KALAMAZOO TEAM— SOUTHERN MICHIGAN ASSOCIATION. 



234 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

Within this very small territory the league has six cities that 
exceed 25,000 each in population, one that is rapidly reaching that 
mark, and one town that is smaller but still a good Base Ball 
center. Figured on 1900 census figures, the league is close to the 
200.000 required for Class C. and it is actually much above these 
figures. All of the towns have enjoyed the normal growth since 
1000, and several have had an abnormal increase. Lansing and 
Flint, for instance, have gained thousands in population through 
the automobile industry. Each has great plants, giving employ- 
ment to a horde of skilled mechanics brought to Michigan to labor 
in an industry practically unknown in 1900. 

Financially the league was a winner in 100S, most of the 
clubs making money, and several of them gaining profits unhoped 
for at the time that the circuit was launched. In the way of 
sales of players the league did well — possibly better than any 
Class D circuit in the country. Twenty-two players were taken 
by purchase or draft, four going to the majors, five to clubs in 
the Class AA division, four to Class A and nine to Class B. Of 
those marked for the big swing. Boston Nationals took Pierce and 
Thomas from Lansing, while Cleveland took Gough from Saginaw 
and Evans from Jackson. Two, at least, of these players are cer- 
tain of try-outs, and none will come back. 

The league affairs were under direction of Joe S. Jackson, presi- 
dent, of the Detroit Free Press, and James A. Reynolds, secretary- 
treasurer, of Jackson, Mich. The latter had charge of all of the 
routine work of the league, including the compiling of the official 
averages, and to his work is largely due the good showing in the 
matter of player sales. Mr. Jackson, at the annual meeting, was 
re-elected president, to serve his fourth term. Mr. Reynolds retired, 
and Dr. Percy A. Glass, of Lake Linden, Mich., was chosen as his 
successor. 

The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders in 
Batting and Fielding in the Southern Michigan League in 1008, 
according to the official records, are given herewith. The complete 
official records are published in Spalding's Official Base Ball 
Record,, for sale by all newsdealers, price 10 cents. 

STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 

Club. Sag. Kal. Jack. Tec. B.C. Lan. Flint. B.C'y.^Yon. PC. 

Saginaw 8 

Kalamazoo 11 

Jackson 9 11 

Tecumseh 8 8 

Battle Creek 10 8 

Lansing 5 8 

Flint 5 6 

Bay City 4 7 



9 


8 


13 


12 


14 


72 


.581 


10 


9 


10 


12 


11 


70 


.556 


10 


12 


8 


7 


11 


68 


.544 




10 


11 


4 


14 


64 


.508 


9 




10 


12 


7 


62 


.496 


7 


7 




14 


10 


60 


.480 


13 


7 


4 




11 


57 


.456 


4 


10 


9 


7 




48 


.381 



Lost 



CHAMPIONSHIP WINNERS IN PREVIOUS YEARS. 
1906— Alt. Clemens 670 1 1907— Tecumseh 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 

Name and Club. G. AB.R. H. PC. i Name and Club. G. AB.R. H. PC. 

Railing, Flint. 37 126 IS 42 .333 Todd. Tecumseh, 35 117 14 35 .299 

Cote, Kalamazoo, 114 413 57 135 .327; Evans. Jackson. 127 474 67 141 .297 

Nolan, Lansing. 16 59 6 19 .322 Parker. Jackson. 109 415 79 121 .292 

Preston, Jackson. 76 2S4 47 91 .320 ('adman. Saginaw, 103 371 50 108 .291 

Morrissev. Lansing, 121 44S 44 141 .315 Beard, Jackson, 87 293 4S 85 .290 

McDonnell, Tecum., 87 344 35 107 .31l| 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



235 



Name and Club. 
Schlatter, Jack., 
Webster, B. City, 



Hadley, Flint, 
Bell, Kalamazoo, 



Fulton, Flint, 
Giddings, Bat. Cr., 



Henderson, Bat. Cr. 
Wagner, Tecumseh, 



Furlong, Kal., 
Slear, Jackson, 



Woods, Bay City, 
Chiesman, Sag., 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 

FIRST BASEMEN. 

G. PO. A. E. PC. I Name and Club. 

102 1086 75 18 .985 McLafferty, Flint, 

125 1265 62 24 . 982 1 White, Saginaw, 

SECOND BASEMEN. 

118 324 383 26 .9651 Dillon, Saginaw, 
127 321 382 28 .962|Traynor, Bat. Cr., 

THIRD BASEMEN. 

124 176 264 19 .9591 Andrews, Kal., 
81 220 130 19 .949|Roth, Battle Creek, 

SHORTSTOPS. 

127 236 432 49 .934|Siner, Jackson, 
26 49 79 9 .934|Shippy, Tecumseh, 

OUTFIELDERS. 

9 4 .9861 Kelly, Kalamazoo, 



G. PO. A. E. PC. 

120 1116 66 24 .980 
31 237 18 6 .977 



100 352 233 25 .959 
70 196 199 18 .956 



125 275 
123 262 



14 6 .979|Hessberger, B. Cr., 



PITCHERS. 
32 4 55 1000|Dailv, Bay City, 
18 17 41 1 .982|Freeland, Bat. Cr., 



118 337 202 30 
24 34 52 5 


.947 
.945 


24 55 71 8 
126 271 355 47 


.933 
.930 


126 161 24 5 
125 388 58 10 


.979 

.978 


32 13 96 3 
65 68 104 5 


.973 
.972 



CATCHERS. 

Mauch, Lansing, 51 348 61 6 3 .985|Martin, Kal., 
Newc'be, B.Cy. 125 682 147 14 11 .983lCadman, Sag., 

PITCHERS' RECORDS. 



97 433 74 11 7 .981 
103 609 123 14 12 .981 



Name and Club. G. W. 

Taylor, Kalamazoo 21 12 

Green, Saginaw 14 9 

McCain, Battle Creek. 25 16 

Hogan, Lansing 24 14 



L. 


AB. 


H. 


3 


593 


141 


3 


388 


103 


7 


757 


164 


7 


688 


198 



H. BB. SO. HB.W T P.TO.NS.PC. 

33 72 12 4 3 4 .800 
31 49 12 4 2 1 .750 
39 59 8 2 3 3 .696 
43 59 7 7 4 .667 




1, Beatty; 2, Theobald; 3, Ulrich; 4, Crum; 5, Henderson; 6, E. J. 
Herr, Mgr. ; 7, J. M. Lamb. Bus. Mgr. : 8, Terry; 9, A. H. Pulford, 
Pres. ; 10, King; 11, J. McDonald, Sec.-Treas.; 12, Piper; 13, Sensen- 
bach; 14, Geincke; 15, Metzger. Bryant's Studio, Photo* 

WINNIPEG TEAM— NORTHERN LEAGUE. 




\1, O'Hearn; 2, Cornell; 3, Whitney; 4, Randall; 5, Bagnall; 6, Lowery; 
\7, Myers; 8, Milligan; 9, Morrow; 10, Purtell; 11, Copple; 12, Ven- 
ning. 
HANNIBAL TEAM, CHAMPIONS ILLINOIS-MISSOURI LEAGUE. 




1, Sanders; 2, Ortman; 3, Wagner; 4, Hill; 5, Shields; 6, Moore; 7, 
Vansickle; 8, Taylor; 9, Fields; 10, Flanagan; 11, Freeman; 12, 
Lucas. 

MACOMB TEAM— ILLINOIS-MISSOURI LEAGUE. 









mm *-& ■ 



1, Pettitt; 2, Syfert; 3, Smale; 4, Weisenberger; 5, Hanna; 6, 

Spaide; 7, Karl; 8. Randall; 9, Kommers; 10. Hicklin; 11, Sampson. 

HAVANA TEAM— ILLINOIS-MISSOURI LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 237 

Illinois-Missouri League 

Economy and strict adherence to salary limit, both of which 
are among the most essentials to the success of a minor league, 
were never more strikingly exemplified, the former more particu- 
larly so, than in the Illinois-Missouri League, a Class "D" organi- 
zation composed of western Illinois towns and one Missouri 
town, the latter being Hannibal, which city won the cham- 
pionship of the league under the able guidance of manager 
Bert Hough. The league was organized with six clubs, Hannibal, 
Mo., Macomb, Havana, Canton, Monmouth and Galesburg, all but 
the first named in Illinois, and the season was ended without 
the loss of a single club to the league, although none of the 
cities, with the exception of Hannibal and Galesburg, were 
very good drawing ones. But strict economy in league expenses, 
as practiced by President A. E. Blaine of Canton, assisted 
materially in making it possible for the new organization to 
live through the season successfully and make a record that is 
an enviable one for the first year of a Class "D" organization. 
The total expenses of the league, as reported by President 
Blaine at the annual meeting after the close of the season was 
less than $2,000, of which about three-fourths was umpires'" 
pay. President Blaine, himself, served the league without pay 
and gave to the organization his best effort, to which is largely 
responsible the success which was attained during the first sea- 
son, which was an experimental one at best, and one during 
which it might be expected that one or two clubs would find 
themselves in financial straits. But to the credit of the manage- 
ment of each local organization, nothing of the kind happened, 
and the league closed its first year with bright prospects for the 
future. The success of the first year makes the coming year 
one of greater prospect, and several other desirable cities have 
begun to seek admission to the new league, and it is likely that 
the season of 1909 will start out with an eight-club circuit in 
the Illinois-Missouri League. 

The playing standard of the new league was greatly in 
advance of what might be expected where the salary limit is 
$600, and the interest never waned, especially among the first 
division clubs. Hannibal won out in the end after a close, hard 
struggle for leading honors with Macomb. Havana was third, 
with President Blaine's home town, Canton, leading the second 
division. The latter barely nosed out Monmouth for this, 
position and Galesburg, which city got a poor start, finished the 
year with cellar championship honors. 

With the experience of the past season to aid the league 
officers, and with the first year safely passed, the Illinois- 
Missouri League will undoubtedly prove one of the leading- 
organizations of Class "D" during the coming season, and with 
a good chief executive there will be no doubt of the success of 
the organization, as the cities which are now included in the 
circuit and the ones that have been seeking admission to the 
circuit for this year, are all live, hustling towns with sufficient 
up-to-date business men, who realize the value of a league Base 
Ball team as an advertising medium for the city, and sufficient 
fans to make the game a permanent feature in each city. 





jK ^ 


11 '■*% ' "l 




' ; mv\ 




VmHI Hi T 

1 ^ ra^i 





1, Maloney; 2, Johnston; 3, Devoe; 4, Schilling; 5, Van Meter; 6, 
Murphy, Mgr. ; 7, Daniels: 8. Roth; 9, Russell; 10, Morgan; 11, Bot- 
torf; 12, Fanning; 13, Ducker. 

CANTON TEAM— ILLINOIS-MISSOURI LEAGUE. 




1, Kilpatrick; 2, Nelch: 3, Rossbach; 4, Hyde; 5, Mekemson; 6, 
Boyd; 7, Slapnicka: 8, Rodman; 9, Smith; 10, McFall; 11, Grogan; 
12, Connell; 13, Sappington; 14, Stewart. 

GALESBURG TEAM— ILLINOIS-MISSOURI LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



239 



The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders L\ 
Batting and Fielding in the Illinois-Missouri League in 1008, accord- 
ing to the official records, are given herewith. The complete 
official records are published in Spalding's Official Base Ball 
Record., for sale by all newsdealers, price 10 cents. 

STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 

Club. Won. Lost. PCI Club. Won. Lost. PC 

Hannibal 67 49 .578 Canton 56 61 .479 

Macomb 66 52 .559 Monmouth 55 62 .470 

Havana 58 60 .492|Galesburg 49 67 .422 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 



Name and Club. 


G. AB. 


R. H. 


PC. 


Name and Club. 


G. AB. 


R. H. 


PC. 


Wolf, Mac, 


28 105 


24 38 


.362 


Randall, Hav., 


24 81 


6 25 


.309 


Williams, Han., 


32 117 


14 41 


.350 


Swalm, Han., 


17 46 


5 14 


.304 


Kommers, Hav., 


114 439 


75 153 


.349 


Shields, Mac, 


117 425 


58 126 


.29<> 


Karl, Hav., 


90 337 


51 107 


.318 


Jones, Mac, 


43 112 


6 33 


.295 


Russell, Can., 


87 294 


53 91 


.310 


Sampson, Hav., 


114 442 


61 130 


.294 



Name and Club. 
Lowry, Han., 
Wagner, Mac, 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 
FIRST BASEMEN. 



G. PO. A. E. PC. 

112 1358 33 23 .984 
117 1194 49 20 .984 



Name and Club. 
Morgan, Can., 
Home, Gal., 



G. PO. A. E. PC. 

32 294 11 6 .981 
32 356 7 9 .97© 



Connell, Gal., 
Siner, Mon., 



SECOND BASEMEN. 

16 49 48 4 .960 1 Rodman, Gal., 
28 63 78 6 .959|Maloney, Can., 



36 65 89 9 .945. 
43 74 111 11 .944 



Irmischer, Mon., 
Johnson, Can., 



THIRD BASEMEN. 

28 28 68 5 .950!Hicklin, Gal.-Hav., 
117 157 269 36 .9231 Moore, Mac, 



79 105 237 30 .919- 
111 162 253 44 .904 



Purtell, Han., 
Russell, Can., 



Bradley, Han., 
Sanders, Mac, 



Swalm, Han., 
Morrow, Han., 



SHORTSTOPS. 
92 186 307 16 .969|Malonev, Can., 
74 139 226 24 .938|Henchen, Can.-Hav., 

OUTFIELDERS. 

20 31 3 1000|Gillis, Mac, 

21 23 3 1 .99llKilpatrick, Gal., 

PITCHERS. 
11 6 49 1000[Hardgrove, Mon., 
27 11 93 1 .990lHorton, Han., 



15 24 
17 26 


30 
46 


4 

7 


.931 
.910 


58 44 
106 224 


6 
9 


1 
5 


.980 
.979 


24 6 
23 


56 
47 


1 

1 


.984 
.979- 



Kane, Gal., 
Lucas, Mac, 



CATCHERS. 

52 402 82 6 .988|Hanna, Hav., 
27 150 48 4 .9S0|Wolf, Mac, 



103 51S 175 16 .977 
27 160 39 5 .975 



Name and Club. 
Swalm, Han., 
Curtis, Mac, 



PITCHERS' RECORDS. 

W. L. PCI Name and Club. W. 

8 3 .727 Kraft, Han., 12 

16 6 .7271Horton, Han 12 



L. 



PC 

.667 
.667 




1, K.\b. Kinsella. President Springfield; 2, Chas. F. Bartson, Presi- 
dent Peoria; 3, P. P. Crafts, President Clinton; 4. Belden Hill, 
Manager Cedar Rapids; 5. Geo. M. Reed, Manager Decatur; 6, C. 
H. Rowland, Manager Dubuque. 

A GROUP OF I.I.I. LEAGUE CLUB OFFICIALS. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 241 

Indiana-Illinois-Iowa League 

By George W. Marney, Springfield, 111. 

Interesting chapters were added to the history of the Indiana- 
Illinois-Iowa League, commonly termed the Three Eye League, with 
the curtain fall of the playing season of 1908. Springfield won 
the championship in a race that was interesting from the begin- 
ning. With Decatur a contender from the early stages, the Sen- 
ators went along at a lively rate, and aided by a valuable pitching 
staff, succeeded in stalling off the Commodores and finished the 
season with a good margin over the closest contenders. 

The season of 1908 was a fairly successful one in the league, 
so far as the southern teams were concerned. Under the direction 
of President Edward Holland of Bloomington, many obstacles were 
overcome and attendance in the larger towns gave a surplus that 
aided the weaker organizations on their tour of the circuit. 

Peoria, the best drawing town in the league, sent out an aggre- 
gation of pennant chasers under the management of Frank Don- 
nelly, a veteran major league twirler. Donnelly was successful in 
the early stages, but at the crucial time, the tide turned and 
Springfield and Decatur were practically alone in the race. Peoria 
led in attendance, the total showing an increase over the previous 
season. 

The league was not exempt from lack of strict business methods, 
and on several occasions complaint was made that the salary limit 
was not adhered to. The weaker organizations were unable to 
keep up with the pace set by associations that had stronger finan- 
cial backing, and it was insisted that the adoption of a salary 
clause, and a penalty for violation must come sooner or later to 
preserve the league. 

Perhaps the season may be classed as the banner year so far as 
fast playing was concerned. This is especially true of Springfield. 
Manager Jack McCarthy, a veteran of the National League, was 
secured by President Richard F. Kinsella at the opening of the 
season. McCarthy promised a pennant winning aggregation and 
made good. George Reed gave Decatur a great aggregation of 
hitters ; Frank Donnelly developed many youngsters for Peoria, 
while Bloomington, Dubuque, Rock Island, Cedar Rapids and Clinton 
played fast ball. Manager Jack Tighe, who landed the pennant 
for' Rock Island in 1907, took charge of that aggregation late in 
the season, and closed with a rush that was astounding to league 
magnates. The furious pace set was sufficient to sweep some of 
the leaders off their feet and cause veterans of the game to wonder. 

Opposition to President Holland was shown early in the season, 
but at the first meeting of the magnates at the close of the Base 
Ball year, he was re-elected. Mr. Holland expressed a desire not to 
lead 'the aggregations for another season and resigned. Michael 
Sexton of Rock Island was named as his successor. The new presi- 
dent is a veteran in Base Ball and has planned methods by which 
the organization hopes to be prosperous in the future. 

Many young players were developed during the season, and have 
been drafted or sold to major organizations. Some of those who 
have been prominent in the league for two or three years have 
been graduated. Old players, as a rule, cling to their places until 
replaced by younger blood. This is true, perhaps, in all leagues, 
but strange to say, many of the old-timers have been sold even 
at this late day and will play next season in higher class organi- 
zations. 




1, Hughes; 2, Scharnweber; 3, Donovan; 4, JSteiger; 5, Cocash; 6, 
Stewart; 7, Ruby; 8, Johnson; 9, Herbert; 10, Smith; 11, Case; 
12, Pres. Kinsella; 13, McCarthy, Mgr.; 14, . Moore; 15, Grandy. 

SPRINGFIELD TEAM— CHAMPIONS I.I.I. LEAGUE. 




1, Wagner; 2, Tennent; 3, Laudermilk; 4, Lelivelt; 5, Swalm; 6, 
Boucher; 7, Prout; 8, Reed, Mgr.; 9, Jacobson; 10, Campbell; 11, 
Moore; 12, Barkwell; 13, Crozier; 14, Fisher; 15, Bittrolff. 

Photo by Reitz. 
DECATUR TEAM— I.I.I. LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



243 



The season of 1908 promises to be even more profitable than the 
one just closed, for the reason that a salary limit of $1,600 will 
be observed, and other precautions to protect weak organizations 
will be taken. Clinton's franchise has been transferred to Daven- 
port, but the remainder of the league will remain intact. 

The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders in 
Batting and Fielding in the I.-I.-I. League in 1908, accord- 
ing to the official records, are given herewith. The complete 
official records are published in Spalding's Official Base Ball 
Record,, for sale by all newsdealers, price 10 cents. 



STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 



Club. Won. Lost. PC. 

Springfield 82 54 .603 

Decatur 77 59 .572 

Cedar Rapids 69 63 .523 

Peoria 66 67 .496 



Club. Won. Lost. PC. 

Dubuque 67 69 .493 

Bloomington 64 73 .467 

Rock Island 59 76 .437 

Clinton 55 78 .414 



CHAMPIONSHIP WINNERS IN PREVIOUS YEARS. 



1901— Terre Haute 649 

1902— Rockford .587 

1903— Bloomington 603 

1904— Springfield .600 



1905— Dubuque 589 

1906— Cedar Rapids 648 

1907— Rock Island 652 



Name and Club. 
Langdon, Bio., 
Jacobson, Dec, 
Collins, C.R., 
Tennant, Dec, 



Name and Club. 
Rohn, Peo., 
Buelow, On., 



Lewee, Peo., 
Prout, Dec, 



Hoffman, Dec, 
Mc Andrews, C.R., 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 



G. AB. R. H. PC. 

16 42 2 14 .333 
25 76 12 25 .329 
61 207 33 68 .328 
140 529 57 164 .310 



Name and Club. 
R. Smith, Spr., 
Jeffries, Dec, 
Backus, Bio., 
Howard, C.R., 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 
FIRST BASEMEN. 



G. PO. A. E. PC. 

136 1344 83 14 .990 
135 1328 124 19 .987 



Name and Club. 
Stark, R.I., 
Kuhn, Bio., 



SECOND BASEMEN. 
110 298 301 17 .972|Melchoir, Bio., 
106 265 282 21 .963 JDaringer, Dub., 

THIRD BASEMEN. 

61 77 144 13 .944 1 Holmes, C.R., 
27 27 60 7 .926| Godwin, Bio., 



G. AB. R. H. PC. 

131 482 80 147 .305 

65 241 34 73 .303 

17 50 5 15 .300 

135 522 70 154 .295 



G, TO. A. E. PC. 

47 442 23 7 .985 
105 1044 71 17 .984 



42 110 101 9 .959 
21 50 54 5 .954 



24 29 53 7 .921 
78 114 160 24 .919 



Prout, Dec, 
Berger, R.I., 



Backoff, Cm., 
Biltz, Peo., 



Owens, Spr., 
Spencer, C.R., 



Yeager, Peo., 
Orendorff, Bio. -Peo., 



SHORTSTOPS. 
25 32 62 4 .9591 Williams, C.R., 
133 341 431 53 . 936 1 Raymond, Peo., 



OUTFIELDERS. 
30 1 1000 1 Ruby, Spr., 
18 5 1000|Loughlin, C.R., 



PITCHERS. 

8 27 lOOOlSteiger, Spr., 
6 46 1 .98l!Neal, R.I., 



CATCHERS. 

29 129 46 2 .9891 Wilkins, Dec-Dub., 
51 290 55 6 .9831 Smith, Cln., 



27 47 
131 293 


82 10 
303 48 


.928 
.925 


130 201 
67 190 


9 

8 


1 
1 


.995 

.994 


43 22 
29 6 


122 

86 


3 

2 


.980 
.979 


19 122 
67 270 


20 
S6 


3 

S 


.979 
.978 







■Jr«L. ) 









I 



1, Mullin; 2. Simon; 3, Howard; 4, Collins; 5, Malicoat: 6. Allen; 

7, Carmichael: 8, Chase; 9, Hill, Mgr.; 10, Davis; 11. Williams: 12, 

Spencer; 13, Walsh; 14, Sours. Photo by Reitz. 

CEDAR RAPIDS TEAM— I.I.I. LEAGUE. 




1, Gilbert; 2, Beltz; 3, Nelson; 4, Saint: 5, Orendorff; 6, Rohn; 7, 
■Wolfe; 8, Swalm; 9, Donnelly, Mgr.; 10, Higgins; 11, Lewee; 12, 



Raymond; 13, Bewer. 



PEORIA TEAM— I.I.I. LEAGUE. 



t t It 


fsf 'firf- 


Mir i ^ * K j 




Yf& 16 ^ t7 ^ 


1 1 18 * <h 



1, Miller; 2, Ovitz; 3, T. O'Brien; 4. Gurney; 5. Pierce; 6. Genins: 
7, Companion; 8, Vandine; 9. M. O'Brien: 10, Nolden; 11. Most; 12, 
Rowland, Mgr.; 13, Pres. Murphy; 14, Lejeune; 15, Weakley; 16, 
Carr, Capt. ; 17, Plass: 18. Daringer. Packwood, Photo. 

DUBUQUE TEAM— I.I.I. LEAGUE. 





i% 



a J 



g»:^ kiij; 



1, Jockhurst; 2, Kuhn; 3, Barker; 4, Syfert; 5, Cormers, Mgr. ; 6, 
Wilson: 7, Godwin; 8, Melchoir; 9. Davidson; 10, Orendorf; 11, 
Beck; 12, Salisbury: 13, Lons; 14. Snyder. 

BLOOMINGTON TEAM— I.I.I. LEAGUE. 




1, Scott; 2, Starke; 3, Novacek; 4, Howard; 5, Lakaff: 6, Neal; 7, 
Wise: 8, Bersrer; 9, Tiche, Mgr.; 10, Wilson; 11, Eng; 12, Lundin; 
13, Murphy; 14, Cook. 

ROCK ISLAND TEAM— I.I.I. LEAGUE. 




1, Fleet; 2, Ohland; 3, Horilik: 4, Jaeger: 5, Isaacs: 6. Nieman: 7, 
Grogan: 8, Nye: 9. Bcelow, Mgr.: 10. Smith; 11. Ronan; 12. Baker: 
13, Thiery 14, Reitz. CLINTON TEAM— I.LI. LEAGUE. Reitz, Photo 




1, Pres. W. R. Bryan; 2^ Gardner; 3, Lang; 4, Dunbar; 5, Bartos; 6, 

Sec. J. F. Komers; 7, Baker; 8, Beumiller; 9, Erickson; 10. Ferguson, 

Mgr.; 11, Dooner; 12. Bredenhagen; 13, McAuley; J 4, Miller: 15. Fox. 

WAUSAD TEAM, CHAMPIONS WISCONSIN-ILLINOIS LEAGUE. 




1, Howell; 2, Letcher: 3, Cook; 4, Hyland, Mascot; 5, Mee: 6. Whit- 
more; 7, Liese; 8, Shaw: 9, Armstrong; 10, Steele; 11, Cassiboine, 
Mgr.; 12, Grimes; 13, Smith; 14, Newell. 

MADISON TEAM— WISCONSIN-ILLINOIS LEAGUE. 




1, Duchem; 2, Becker; 3, Watson; 4, Harms; 5, Flynn; 6, Bues; 7, 
Eberle; 8, Bailies: 9, Safford; 10, Tracey; 11, Hawley, Mgr.; 12, 
Graves; 13, Killian; 14, Bond: 15, Jones. 

LA CROSSE TEAM— WISCONSIN-ILLINOIS LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



247 



Wisconsin-Illinois League 

By Manning R. Vaughan, Milwaukee, Wis. 

The Wisconsin-Illinois league, known as the "Little Giant of the 
West," finished the year of 1908 well fortified to start its campaign 
of 1909. 

Playing Class B ball and paying Class B salaries in a Class D 
league is usually followed by disaster, but thanks to unusual pat- 
ronage and clever management President Moll's organization was 
able to do this and finish the season with a clean slate. 

An exciting pennant race, which was won by the Wausau club 
headed by Charley Ferguson, the former St. Paul pitcher, kept the 
interest at a high pitch all season and resulted in an increase in 
attendance of thirty per cent over that of the previous year. Wausau 
won only after a hard struggle, each of the first four clubs having 
a chance of taking top honors until two weeks of the season's 
finish. 

Much share of the credit for the successful season enjoyed by the 
league belongs to Charles P. Moll of Milwaukee, through whose 
efforts the organization was increased from a six- to an eight-club 
league. He handled the affairs connected with his office in a busi- 
ness-like manner. That his efforts were appreciated by the club- 
owners was demonstrated at the annual meeting, following the 
close of the season, ■ when he was re-elected for a term of three 
years. 

Though many freak performances marked the race, one record 
established by the Fond du Lac club deserves mention. This club,, 
under the management of Bobby Lynch, played forty-eight con- 
secutive innings before reaching a decision. On Decoration Day, 
Madison and Fond du Lac played a twelve-inning 1 to 1 tie in the 
morning. The game was called to allow the players to eat. At 
two o'clock the battle was renewed, and after seventeen innings 
of the hottest kind of Base Ball the game was called with the score 
again a tie. On the following day the two clubs played once more. 
Again it was nine innings to a 1 to 1 tie, the game, being called to 
allow the visiting team to catch a train. The next day Fond du Lac 
club went to Oshkosh, where it was beaten in another extra inning- 
game which went eleven rounds before a decision was reached. 

On August 3 Fond Du Lac and Oshkosh played a contest of 
twenty-three innings. In this game second baseman Wisser of the 
Fond Du Lack club accepted thirty-five chances without an error. 
Neither pitcher gave a man a base on balls or hit a batter. 

Base Ball has come to stay in Wisconsin, and with the next 
taking of a national census, the league will probably be raised to 
a Class C organization. 

The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders in 
Batting and Fielding in the Wisconsin-Illinois League in 1908, ac- 
cording to the official records, are given herewith. The complete 
official records are published in Spalding's Official Base Ball 
Record,, for sale by all newsdealers, price 10 cents. 



STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 



Club. 



Won. Lost. PC. 



Wausau 71 48 .597 

Madison 6S 54 .550 

La Crosse 66 57 .537 

Green Bay 65 58 .528 



Club. Won. Lost. PC. 

Fon du Lac 58 65 .472 

Freeport 57 64 .471 

Oshkosh 55 66 .455 

Rockford 48 n .393 




1, Harninond; 2. Saveland; 3, Saxe; 4, Kiernan; 5. Carroll; 6, Roach; 

7, Strernmel: 8, Pickett, Mgr. ; 9, Miller; 10, Vance; 11. Johnston; 

12, Boyle: 13. Stickney: 14, Mascot. Kurz. Photo. 

GREEN BAY TEAM— WISCONSIN-ILLINOIS LEAGUE. 




1, Zackert: 2. Watson; 3. Schaub; 4. Parish; 5, Leise; 6. Riley; 7. 
Stang; S, Rowley: 9, McDonald; 10, Hooker; 11, Kostal; 12, Lynch; 
13, Wisser: 14, Kroy. 

FOND DU LAC TEAM— WISCONSIN-ILLINOIS LEAGUE. 




1, Oieson; 2, Rogers; 3, Smith: 4, Olis; 5. Kaphan; 6, Sullivan; 
7. Green: S. Palmer: 9, Golden: 10. Hutton: 11, Wallace; 12, Rora- 
baugh; 13. O'Leary; 14, Chambers: 15. Butcher. 

ROCKFORD TEAM— WISCONSIN-ILLINOIS LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



249 



CHAMPIONSHIP 

1905— La Crosse 

1306— La Crosse G44 



WINNERS IN PREVIOUS YEARS. 

623 1907— Freeport 658 



Name and Club. 
Miller. Wau., 
. Whitiuore, Mad., 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 
G. AB. R. H. PC. | Name and Club. 
124 408 91 156 .383 Kroy, Fon., 
118 446 56 148 .3321 



G. AB. R. H. PC. 
71 270 36 82 .303 



Name and Club. 
McCauley, G.B., 
Brady, Wau., 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 
FIRST BASEMEN. 
G. PO. A. E. PC. i Name and Club. 
61 617 27 10 .985 Tracey, Lax., 
120 1344 34 23 .984[Rainey, Osh., 



G. PO. A. E. PC. 

118 1171 51 20 .984 
16 16„ 18 5 .984 



SECOND BASEMEN. 
Anklam, Osh., 107 253 277 21 .980[ Ferguson, Wau., 

Harris, Roc, 16 34 45 3 .964|Wisser, Fon., 



47 77 44 5 .959 
82 214 245 25 .948 



Bues. Lax., 
O'Leary, Roc, 



THIRD BASEMEN. 
117 150 230 25 .9381 Fox, Wau., 
117 130 265 27 .936[Dolan, Osh. 



107 182 311 35 .933 
120 186 153 25 .931 



Groh, Osh., 
Cook, Mad., 



SHORTSTOPS. 

119 256 362 42 .9361 Hammond, G.B., 

120 229 302 42 .927|Fiske, Fre., 



62 166 250 36 .920 
126 267 331 53 .919 



Kowalke, Osh., 
Corrigan, G.B., 



OUTFIELDERS. 



lOOOlLannon, Fre., 
lOOOl Howell, Mad. ; 



17 51 3 1000 
92 197 23 2 .991 



Smith. Mad., 
Stark, Fre., 



CATCHERS. 

71 647 117 6 .992( Johnson, G.B., 
113 585 266 10 .990] Erickson, Wau., 



89 627 139 9 .990 
112 656 150 12 .985 



Tonneson, Mad., 
Puttman, G.B., 



PITCHERS. 

1000|Miller, G.B.-Roc, 

10001 Lang, Wau., 

□ □ □ 



38 17 108 1 .992 
50 30 103 1 .992 



Gulf Coast League 

The Gulf Coast League started its season April 30 and', owing 
to continuous bad weather, the attendance was very light. The 
League decided to close on June 1. Standing of the clubs at the 
time of disbandment : 



Cluh. Won. Lost. PC. 

Lake Charles 18 9 .667 

Orange 15 16 .4*4 



Alexandria 14 



15 



Club. Won. Lost. TC. 

Morgan City 14 15 .483 

Beaumont 11 13 .458 

Crowley 13 17 .433 



250 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

Eastern Illinois League 

By 0. H. Henson, Dalton City, 111, 

Having had a successful season in 1907, and having proved 
to be one of the fastest leagues of its class despite its youth, 
the Eastern Illinois was preparing for another good year, when 
the financial situation caused the league to disband. This 
league was organized at Pana a year ago, and its godfather 
was Joe Adams, "Old Wagon Tongue," as he is known all over 
Illinois. 

That year six clubs were awarded franchises — Pana, Shelby- 
ville, Charleston, Taylorville, Paris and Mattoon, and last year 
the same clubs, with two additions (Danville, 111., and Yin- 
cennes, Ind.), made a circuit of eight clubs. 

After dragging along for two or three months, Pana and 
Danville threw up its franchise. Then the remaining clubs met 
and admitted two new clubs (Linton, Ind., and Staunton, 111.), 
and started again. Within a month or so Paris and Charleston 
quit, leaving six clubs. 

The league played ahead till about August 20, when the 
directors of the clubs held a meeting which caused the league 
to disband. 

The league developed some fast youngsters, who were signed 
by several clubs, and are as good players as any Class D 
league ever turned out. Coombs, the star outfielder of the 
Eastern Illinois League, will be with Decatur in the Three-Eye 
League. Pitcher Carter of Mattoon will be given a trial by 
Decatur. Pitcher Carmical of Vincennes, the leading pitcher, 
was given a trial with Cedar Rapids in the Three-Eye League 
and was considered a star. Higgins of Shelbyville and Saint 
of Taylorville were taken on by Peoria in the Three-Eye League. 

STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 

Club. Won. Lost. PC. Club. Won. Lost. PC. 

Staunton 23 9 .718 Shelbyville 17 17 .500 

Vincennes 23 10 .690 Taylorville 16 16 .500 

Paris 17 15 .531 Linton 7 26 .212 




1, Wagner; 2, Lattimer; 3, Zurich; 4, Snyder; 5, Hollycross; 6, 

Narien; 7, Quiesser; 8, Campbell; 9, Wortham, Pres. and Mgr. ; 10, 
Grimes; 11, Fleming; 12, Dethridge, Capt. 

DANVILLE (ILL.) TEAM— EASTERN ILLINOIS LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



251 



Oklahoma-Kansas League 

By President D. M. Shively 

The Oklahoma-Kansas League had indifferent success last season, 
and will not be in existence in 1909. The season started April 30 
with six towns, including Iola, Independence, Bartlesville, Tulsa, 
Muskogee and McAlester. The McAlester club quit July 5, and Iola 
was allowed to withdraw and transfer its players to Springfield a 
few days later. The other four clubs ran on through the season, 
closing September 8, one day later than called for in the original 
schedule. 

Bartlesville and Muskogee were anxious to join the Western 
Association, and as there were vacancies on account of the sale of 
Topeka and Wichita to the Western League, the other clubs decided 
to let the two Oklahoma towns go. Tulsa and Independence were 
both considered for Western Association berths, but Bartlesville 
and Muskogee were considered the best and plucked the plums. 

The Oklahoma-Kansas League season was split last year and the 
races of both halves were exciting. Bartlesville beat Muskogee out 
in the last three games of the first season and Tulsa performed the 
the same feat with Independence in the last season. Tulsa had a 
walkover with Bartlesville in the play off, winning two straight out 
of the three scheduled. 




I, Lyons, Capt.; 2, Long; 3, Speck; 4, R. Gill; 5. Dennv; 6, Alford; 
7, Sanrwein, Mgr. ; 8, T. C. Harden. Pres. ; 9, J. Kelly; 10, W. Kelly; 

II, Mason; 12, Campbell; 13, Wolverton; 14, J. Gill; 15, Killilay. 
TULSA TEAM, CHAMPIONS OKLAHOMA-KANSAS LEAGUE. 




W % 3 1 



1, Webster; 2, Hoey; 3, Wagner; 4, Doak; 5, Ross; 6, Rath; 7, 
McDonald; 8, Bussey; 9, Kite; 10, Sec.-Treas. Hatch; 11, Smith, 
Mgr.-Capt.; 12, Pres. Gwaltney; 13, Levy; 14, Cooper; 15, Jays; 16, 
Sharp. Ellis, Photo. 

WILMINGTON TEAM, CHAMPIONS EASTERN CAROLINA 
LEAGUE. 




1, Wagner: 2, Mavberry; 3, Thompson; 4, Miller: 5, Guerrant; 6, 
Mills: 7, Moore: 8, Holt, Mgr. ; 9, Ogle; 10, Turner; 11, Hugg; 12, 
Anderson; 13. Adams. Foust, Photo. 

WILSON TEAM— EASTERN CAROLINA LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 253 

Eastern Carolina League 

By Louis T. Moore, Wilmington, \. C. 

The season started June S. 100S, with a six-team circuit, the 
places represented being Wilson. Wilmington. New Berne, Raleigh, 
Kinston and Goldsboro. After the season had been continued for 
about five weeks, New Berne and Kinston, on account of poor 
support of their teams, withdrew. Wilson was in the lead at the 
time of the disbandment. The remaining four teams held a meeting 
and decided to continue the season until August 18, dividing the 
season into equal halves. Wilson was declared the winner of the 
first half and the team leading in the second, according to arrange- 
ment, was to play off a series of games with Wilson for the pennant. 

The race for the first position in the second half of the season 
was pretty to a degree, and at the conclusion of a stirring series of 
games between Wilmington, Wilson and Goldsboro, these teams 
finished in the order named with only a few points separating the 
aggregations in the per rentage column, with Raleigh bringing up the 
rear of the procession. 

It was decided that Wilmington and Wilson should play a series 
of seven games for the pennant, the team winning four games to 
have the emblem. The first three games were played at Wilmington. 
and this team succeeded in securing two victories out of the three 
contests. The teams then went to Wilson for the concluding games 
of the intended series. Rain interfered with the playing of the 
games for two successive days at the end of which period the 
Wilson team disbanded, with the Wilmington team intact on the 
scene and ready to finish the series. Wilson, however, had let its 
team depart and Wilmington therefore claimed the pennant. 

Just before the conclusion of the season Wilmington and Golds- 
boro, while fighting desperately for positions, played a most remark- 
able series of games at Wilmington. Four games were played in 
contests of nine, seventeen, fourteen and seven innings respectively. 
Wilmington shut out Goldsboro in every game, the score in the 
first game being 2 to 0, and in the remaining three games 1 to 0, 
respectively, in favor of Wilmington. The last two games were 
played in one afternoon. In the games Wilmington played Golds- 
boro for a total of forty-seven innings, the equivalent of five and 
two-ninths games, without allowing a single runner to cross the 
plate. In the fourteen-inning game, which was pitched for Wilming- 
ton by McDonald, who finished the season here after the Spartan- 
burg team in the Carolina Association team disbanded, the minimum 
number of batters which could face the pitcher was forty-two. and 
only three above this number stepped to the plate. In the last 
eleven innings only thirty-three batters faced McDonald. Levy, for 
Wilmington, who pitched the seventeen-inning game, made equally as 
good a record and allowed only one hit in nine innings. The re- 
maining six hits secured by Goldsboro came in different innings 
and had no effect upon Levy's sensational work. 

m Indications are very bright for the approaching season. The 
circuit will be extended to six teams by the addition of Rocky 
Mount and Fayetteville, and the schedule' will cover four and one- 
half months. 

The standing of the clubs in the East Carolina League in 1908, 
according to the official records, is given herewith. 

Club. Won. Lost. PC. Club. Won. Lost. PC. 

Wilmington 22 12 .647 Goldsboro 18 16 .529 

Wilson 19 12 .613 Raleigh S 27 .229 




1, Goode: 2, Broderiek: 3. Breen: 4. Ehman: 5. Nebinger: 6. Texter: 
7, Brackenridse. MgF.; 8, Davidson; 9. Speas; 10. Callahan: 11. Hille; 
12. Murray; 13. Schwartz. Capt.; 14, Carroll; 15, Murphy: 16. Arm- 
strong. Peck, Photo. 

AKRON TEAM, CHAMPIONS OHIO-PENNSYLVANIA LEAGUE. 




1, Tenable: 2, McClellan; 3. Alcock: 4. Rapp; 5, Gaston: 6. Wolfe; 
7, Woodruff: 8. Phillips; 9, Tarleton; 10, Nolly; 11, Manning; 12, 
Fisher; 13, Beecher. 

EAST LITERPOOL TEAM— OHIO-PENNSYLTANIA LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 255 

Ohio and Pennsylvania League 

By Nate Tuholkey, Akron, Ohio 

Before the season opened Canton and East Liverpool, in Ohio, and 
AlcKeesport and Erie, in Pennsylvania, were admitted to the new 
organization, making an eight-club circuit. With these additions 
the league had five towns in which steel mills were the principal 
industries. 

The financial reverses that prevailed during the summer of 1008 
forced the closing of these mills. Naturally attendance in the 
league was greatly affected. 

By July 4 most of the towns had found the going very rough 
and " only the tact and sound judgment of President Morton kept 
the organization on its feet. In the latter part of August McKees- 
port club owners announced that they could not play longer than 
September 7, Labor Day. At this time, however, the league voted 
down the proposition to close on that date. 

League affairs were brought to a crisis near the close of the 
month by the withdrawal of support by the Youngstown backers. 
The Youngstown team was forced to play on the co-operative plan, 
transferring all home games, and on a second vote the league decided 
to quit September 7. 

By its early close the league lost much money which would other- 
wise have been received for drafted and purchased players. 

Akron won the pennant and established a new winning per- 
centage of .692. The best previous percentage was made in the 
full season of 1907 by Youngstown and was .623. 

Akron made a record by leading all the other clubs in hitting, 
fielding, base running and sacrifice hitting. Akron also made more 
runs, more total bases on hits and fewer errors. 

As usual Youngstown made a whirlwind start and held the 
leadership at times until July 4. After that Y^oungstown suddenly 
went to pieces and gradually slipped down in the race to fifth place, 
where it finished. 

For a time East Liverpool made a hard fight for first position, 
but Akron gradually increased its lead and by the first week in 
August the final result was a foregone conclusion. Although Goode, 
who led the league in hitting, was sold to Cleveland in the middle 
of the season, Akron finished with a spurt, winning twenty-two out 
of the last twenty-six games and the last fourteen in a row. 

The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders in 
Batting and Fielding in the Ohio and Penn. League in 1908, accord- 
ing to the official records, are given herewith. The complete 
official records are published in Spaldng's Official Base Ball 
Record, for sale by all newsdealers, price 10 cents. 

STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 

Club. Ak. E.L. Can. Sh. Ygs. New.McK. Erie. G.W. PC. 

Akron 9 11 10 12 13 10 16 81 .692 

E. Liverpool '7 .. 8 12 11 8 12 12 70 .625 

Canton 4 6 .. 10 10 15 10 10 65 .546 

Sharon 9 6 8 .. 7 11 10 11 62' .525 

Youngstown 4 5 8 8 .. 9 11 13 58 .492 

Newcastle 7 3 5 4 10 .. 8 10 47 .402 

McKeesport 4 6 6 8 4 9 .. 7 44 .37J 

Erie 1 7 8 4 6 5 11 .. 42 .347 

Games lost 36 42 54 56 60 70 72 79 




1. Brittsen: 2, McKeehnie; 3, Bales: 4, Reirdon; 5, Lindsay; 6, 
Baley: 7. Murphy: 8, Myers: 9. Vasbinder: 10. Lichtenbaugh; 11, 
Brown: 12. Miller: 13. Miller: 14. Mimson: 15. Perry. 

CANTON TEAM— OHIO AND PENNSYLVANIA LEAGUE. 






1. Gray; 2. Sellers: 3. Patterson. Mgr. : 4. Rapp: 5. Noah: 6. Mackev; 
7. Tooley: 8. Clyde: 9. Miller: 10. Clever: 11, Bair; 12. Clark; 13, 
Cullen. 

SHARON TEAM— OHIO AND PENNSYLVANIA LEAGUE. 




1. McNeil: 2. Kirwin: 3, Rodebaugh: 4. West: 5. Shettleworth; 6, 

Strood: 7. Beatty: S. Mattison: 9, Crutchley; 10. Nallin: 11, Cole; 

12, Kipp: 13. Castle. Hoyt, Photo. 

ERIE TEAM— OHIO AND PENNSYLVANIA LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



257 



1905 



CHAMPIONSHIP 
-Youngstown 



WINNERS IN PREVIOUS YEARS. 



1906— Youngstown 613 1 



72S 1 1907— Youngstown 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 



Name and Club. 


G. AB. 


R. H.SH. 


PC 


Name and Club. 


G. AB. 


R. H.SH. 


PC. 


W'eimer. N., 


71 258 


31 99 7 


.384 


J. Miller, McK., 


43 170 


23 52 4 


.306 


Goode, A., 


96 387 


58 143 9 


.370 


Fisher, E.L., 


47 161 


18 49 1 


.304 


Gray, S., 


83 310 


37 105 7 


.339 


Bailey, C, 


119 429 


69 130 14 


.303 


McAleese, Y., 


114 455 


81 150 7 


.330 


Schwartz, A., 


105 405 


57 122 33 


.301 


RayMiller,McK. 


92 342 


60 111 13 


.325 


Murphy, A., 


93 313 


31 92 13 


.294 


Woodruff, E.L., 


99 370 


38 120 20 


.324 


Perry, C, 


108 392 


61 114 8 


.291 


Tarleton, E.L., 


108 395 


71 125 14 


.316 


Hanlon, S., 


34 117 


14 34 4 


.291 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 
FIRST BASEMEN. 
Name and Club. G. PO. A. E. PC. I Name and Club. G. PO. A. E. PC. 

Schwartz, A.. 104 1052 39 5 .995iSnvder, McK., 22 222 7 2 .991 

Kemmer. McK., 23 221 18 2 .991|Tarleton, E. L., 108 1136 84 14 .989 



SECOND BASEMEN. 



Clever, N.-S., 
Gilligan, Y., 


68 
32 


213 

89 


162 
79 


9 .977jMcGrew, C, 
6 .966JMcClintock, Y., 


24 
36 


51 
97 


72 
113 


5 
9 


.961 

.959 








THIRD BASEMEN. 












Getz, McK., 
McKechnie, C, 


35 
118 


49 
155 


89 
317 


8 .945|McCay, McK., 
29 .942|Cosma, E., 

SHORTSTOPS. 


16 
15 


21 
52 


43 
23 


4 

5 


.941 
.938 


Lindsay. C. 
Broderick, A., 


114 
116 


267 
248 


465 
379 


31 .959 Clever, N.-S., 
33 .950iColligan, E.-Y., 


36 


61 
165 


110 
247 


9 

2S 


.950 
.936 








LEFT FIELDERS. 












Mathay. A.. 
Woodruff, E. L., 


15 
86 


20 
173 


3 
16 


1.000 'Collins. S., 
4 .979 ! Tuohey, E., 


25 

20 


43 
39 


1 


1 
1 


.978 
.976 








CENTER FIELDERS. 












McCrossen. N., 
Callahan, A., 


33 

27 


66 
56 


3 
1 


1.000 Sellers, S., 

1 .983,McCracken, C.-E. 


110 
34 


272 
^67 


16 
4 


6 

2 


.9S0 
.973 








RIGHT FIELDERS. 












Callahan. A., 
Strom, E., 


83 

17 


108 
10 


7 



l.OOOTlorv. E., 
l.OOOiKerr, Y., 

PITCHERS. 


15 

104 


16 
1S3 



10 




2 


1.000 
.990 


Brittsen, C, 
Clyde, S., 


26 
24 


4 

5 


90 
60 


1.000 Eastley, McK., 

1 .985iBrackenridge, A., 

CATCHERS. 


2° 
25 


14 
9 


33 
106 


1 
3 


.981 
.975 


Kunkle, E. L., 
Texter, A., 


24 
28 


112 
164 


21 
25 


1 .993!Hanlon. S.. 

2 .990 Murphy. A., 


34 
92 


197 
469 


37 

74 


3 

S 


.987 
.985 








PITCHERS' RECORDS. 












Name and Club 




G. 


W. 


L. PC. | Name and Club. 




G. 


W. 


L. 


PC. 


Philipps, E. L., 
Ehman, A:, 




22 
33 


18 
25 


4 .818 Compton. Y., 
8 .758 Fisher, E. L., 




17 
26 


12 

18 


5 

S 


.706 
.692 



258 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

South Carolina State League 

By Secretary E. B. Houseal 

The South Carolina League ended its season August 1 with the 
Sumter team again in the lead for the pennant, this same club 
having captured the Palmetto emblem the season before. This fast 
Class D circuit began its season May 7. From the very jump 
Sumter took the lead and held it, except for one or two brief spells 
when the contest waxed warm. Especially close and exciting was 




1, Temple; 2, Hammond; 3, Wideman; 4, Caldwell, Mgr. ; 5, Drake; 
6, Brownlee; 7, Hamrick; 8, Prim; 9, Averett; 10, Thackam; 11, 
Blanton; 12, Mascot. CHESTER TEAM. 

the wind-up when the sturdy Chester team, fighting every inch of 
ground, climbed close up to the Sumter club and fought it out 
until one day before the close of the season, when Sumter won a 
decisive battle over Orangeburg, and the Chester Collegians went 
down before their most bitter enemy — Rock Hill? 




1, Winger; 2, Thomas; 3, Goheen; 4, Richardson; 5, Miller; G, Clan- 
cey; 7, Asper; 8, Brown; 9, James; 10, Gunter, Mgr.; 11, Whalen; 



12, Robertson. 



ROCK HILL TEAM. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



259 



The quality of the hall handed out hy this four-cornered circuit 
is best evidenced by the fact that only a few of the players have 
been retained by the clubs for next season, the financial end of 
the game having been materially strengthened by sales outright and 
by drafting. 

The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders in 
Batting and Fielding in the South Carolina League in 1908, accord- 
ing to the official records, are given herewith. The complete 
official records are published in Spalding's Official Base Ball 
Record, fcr sale by all newsdealers, price 10 cents. 

STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 
Club. Won. Lost. PCI Club. Won. Lost. PC. 

Sumter 41 27 .603 Rock Hill 28 40 .412 

Chester 40 30 .571 [Orangeburg 27 



.409 



Championship team 1907, Sumter, .651. 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 

Name and Club. G. AB. R. H. SH.PC. I Name and Club. G. AB. R. H. SH.PC. 

Simmons, O., 46 144 24 51 6 .354 Brownlee, C, 46 163 17 49 8 .301 

Temple, C, 47 158 29 52 3 .329|Murrow, S.-O., 64 229 29 67 8.293 



Name and Club. 
Moran, O.-S., 
Brownlee, C, 



Drake, C, 
Callahan, O., 



Sorrell, S., 
Brown, R. H.-S., 



Simmons, O., 
Dingle, S., 



Callahan, O.. 
Winger, R. H., 



Name and Club. 
Roberts, O., 
Biel, C, 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 
FIRST BASEMEN. 
G. PO. A. E. PCI Name and Club. 
49 463 12 9 .982 Murrow, S.-O., 

42 462 2 14 .971|Yount, C, 

SECOND BASEMEN. 

72 151 206 29 .925|Brown. R. H.-S., 
46 118 117 23 .911 1 Wynne, S., 

THIRD BASEMEN. 
46 41 86 13 .935|Simmons, O., 

43 41 56 10 .907|Bissell, R. H., 

SHORTSTOPS. 

23 48 71 13 .923|Fischman, C, 
48 80 144 19 .922lHartsell, O., 

OUTFIELDERS. 

23 38 6 2 .978 1 Glaze, O., 
38 41 3 2 .977lLong, S., 

PITCHERS. 
G. PO. A.E. WP.rC I Name and Club. 
10 1 24 1000 Garner, S., 
20 14 40 2 .964|Long, S., 



G. PO. A. E. PC 

63 567 15 18 .970 
16 120 1 6 .962 



?0 
56 


32 
145 


50 
134 


8 

28 


.911 
.909 


22 
18 


30 
14 


43 
18 


8 
5 


.901 
.865 


23 
20 


48 
35 


34 
53 


13 

16 


.863 
.846 


38 

22 


68 
34 


4 



2 
1 


.973 
.973 


0. 


PO.A.E.WP.PC 


11 

12 


9 33 1 
6 32 1 




2 


.953 
.927 



Name and Club. 
Hamrick, C, 
Sturtevant, O., 



Name and Club. 
Long. S., 
Temple, C, 



CATCHERS. 
G. TO. A. E. FB.PC I Name and Club. 
52 272 49 9 3 .964 MeCormick. O., 
40 271 33 10 4 .956lAsper, R. IL, 

PITCHERS' RECORDS. 
G. W. L. T. PC! Name and Club. 
12 9 3 .750 Cowell, S., 
22 15 7 .682lJohnson, O., 



G. PO. A.E.PB.rC 

22 137 28 8 8 .954 
39 224 37 6 8 .953 



G. W. L. T. PC. 

16 11 5 .650 
13 6 5 2 .545 



260 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

Arkansas State League 

By Douglass Hotchkiss, Hot Springs, Ark. 

Closing a first year under such wholesome conditions as to warrant 
the prophecy -that the Arkansas State League will remain a part 
and parcel of organized balldom indefinitely, officers of this fir^t 
year's venture are now looking to the future with highest antici- 
pation. The State League was organized one year ago after inde- 
pendent teams had been maintained in four of the cities of the 
State with some degree of success. 




1, Dr. W. O. Forbes, Pres.; 2, Cowan; 3, Blakenv; 4, Chas. H. Davis, 
Sec.-Treas.: 5, Fay: 6. Wrisrtit: 7, Naylor; 8, Williams: 9, Liles; 10, 
Coyle; 11, Blakeley; 12, Smitheal; 13, Besse; 14, Hilgefort. 
HOT SPRINGS TEAM— CHAMPIONS ARKANSAS STATE LEAGUE. 

At the opening meeting and formation of the league Hot Springs. 
Argenta, Pine Bluff, Helena, Newport, in Arkansas, and Poplar BluflE 
in Missouri, were represented and each took franchises. 

T. J. Craighead of Hot Springs was elected president, W. W. 
Hurst of Argenta, vice-president : Charles H. Davis of Hot Springs, 
secretary, and J. W. Faulkner of Helena, treasurer. 

One notable sale was made during the playing season when Hot 
Springs disposed of James Vaughan, a Texas left-hander, to the 




1, Harmon; 2, Schmidt; 3, Haiald; 4, Benhain; 5, Weber; t>, Uornian; 
7, Jetzi; 8, Cooney; 9, Rodgers; 10, Patton; 11, Begley. 
HELENA TEAM— ARKANSAS LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



261 



New York Americans, for ,$750. Vaughan had pitched fourteen 
games for the team and won all but one, which resulted in a tie. 

The league starts the 1909 season with a new organization. At 
the winter meeting W. W. Hurst, former vice-president, was elected 
president, secretary and treasurer, the three offices having been 
combined under a special resolution. 

The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders in 
Batting and Fielding in the Arkansas State League in 1908, accord- 
ing to the official records, are given herewith. The complete 
official records are published in Spalding's Official Base Ball 
Record, for sale by all newsdealers, price 10 cents. 

STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 



Club. Won. Lost. 

Hot Springs 78 38 

Newport 65 . 44 

Helena 67 48 



PC. 

.672 
.596 
.583 



Club. Won. Lost. PC. 

Pine Bluff 51 61 .455 

Argenta 49 68 .419 

Brinkley 28 79 .262 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 



AB. R. H. SH. PC. 

L .444 



Name and Club. 
Hoffman, New., 
Coyle, H.S., 
Blakeley, H.S., 
Rollins, Bri., 144 14 53 

Herrold, Hel., 63 8 22 

Besse, H.S., 
Castle, New. 
Fisher, Arg., 



37 6 16 1 
473 134 178 18 
311 68 115 19 
3 
7 
471 109 65 12 
164 29 56 ' 9 
129 21 42 5 



.376 
.370 
.369 
.365 
.350 
.341 
.341 



Name and Club. 
Kimbell, New. 



AB. R. H. SH. PC. 

172 26 56 



Parrott, Arg.-H.S., 344 45 111 14 .323 

Rogers, Hel., 115 17 36 7 .313 

Dawkins, Bri.-PB., 247 37 77 6 .312 

Bromley, Arg., 432 63 133 17 .310 

Keathley, H.S.-Br. 179 26 55 1 .307 

Huff, Hel., 193 23 57 5 .295 

Hayes, New.-Bri., 82 16 24 2 .293 



Name and Club. 
Riggs, Arg., 
Begley, Hel., 



Castle, New., 
Cowan, H.S., 



Earthman, New., 
Weber, Hel., 



Wilhelm, Arg., 
Michael, Arg., 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 
FIRST BASEMEN. 
PO. A. E. PC. I Name and Club. 
103 33 6 .982 Coyle, H.S., 
660 53 13 .98l|Rainey, H.S.-Brink., 

SECOND BASEMEN. 
103 109 11 .950|Jetsie, Hel., 
159 162 18 .947|Crimmins, Brink., 

THIRD BASEMEN. 

41 50 12 .980|Larsen, Hel., 
12S 112 13 .949|Ruh, P.B., 

SHORTSTOPS. 
60 83 21 .971jO'Hern, New., 
216 314 40 .930|Smitheal, H.S., 



PO. A. E. PC. 

1200 91 31 .977 



26 24 3 .943 
332 236 44 .912 



Keeler, New., 50 

Henderson, New., 10 



Rogers, Hel., 18 92 

Cooney, Hel., 25 27 



A.Nay'r,H.S.(also lb.) 17 
Parrott, Arg.-H.S., 595 115 



OUTFIELDERS. 

3 1000|Sullinger, Arg., 
3 1000|Gfoerer, P.B., 

PITCHERS. 

7 .970|Kimbell, New., 
2 .969 1 Robertson, New., 

CATCHERS. 
1000 1 Berry, P.B., 
12 .99l|Harlow, Hel., 



Name and Club. 
VaugLan, H.S., 
Wright, H.S., 27 



PITCHERS' RECORDS. 

W. L. Tie. I Name and Club. 
9 1 Hilgefort. New.-H.S., 



3 1 Weber, Hel., 



48 


98 


8 .939 


54 


95 


16 .904 


155 


311 


43 .915 


109 


244 


35 .910 


11 


1 


1000 


175 


13 


2 .939 


40 


103 


5 .987 


7 


22 


1 .966 


417 


83 


5 .990 


466 


85 


9 .983 


W. 


I 


. Tie. 


25 




8 


11 




3 J 



"' If- 


jjlPj . 


>.,. 


I*'* In 


n v 




'i •«»] 


Ml ; ■ ,. 


Si, SMI 

. ST ; 


...^J 


%m 


pb^ ' fiR 



1, Lindsay; 2, Pickett; 3, Garvey; 4, Parsons; 5. Miller; 6, Link; 7, 

Fink; 8, Sykes; 9, Jackson, Capt. ; 10, Newnham; 11, Dunnigan, 

Mgr.; 12, E. Reilly; 13, A. Reilly; 14, Nefeau; 15, Foutz. Photo 

LIMA TEAM— OHIO STATE LEAGUE. Fenner Bros. 




1, Harmon; 2, Bailey; 3, Lloyd; 4, Yarnell; 5. Bucholz; 6, Davey; 
7, Breymaier; 8, Kettler; 9, Biery, Capt.; 10, Pres. Sturges: 11, 
Whiting, Bus. Mgr.; 12, Flood, Mgr.; 13, Mathay; 14, Jewell; 15, 
Burke; 16, M^-n- 17. Channel. 

MANSFIELD TEAM— OHIO STATE LEAGUE. 




1, Dooin; 2, Mercer; 3, Spencer; 4, Gray; 5, Dailev; 6, Latimore; 
7, Moeller; 8, LaRue: 9. Botford; 10, Doyle; 11, Bohannon; 12, Ed 
Ransick, Pres.; 13, Burt, Capt.; 14, Fish. 

PORTSMOUTH TEAM— OHIO STATE LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 263 

Ohio State League 

By W. D. Nothacker, Lancaster, Ohio 

The Ohio State League made its debut last season and proved 
to be one of the best of the lower class leagues in the country, 
much credit of which was due to the able admii.: : its 

president. Robert Quinn of Columbus, O. He ht " " 

:he rules of the league were Lived 
limit of £1.600 a month was adopted, and 
it, ex surplus players were a necessity. 

re in a position 
little winning streak, to step in the lead. I 



tight 



st 1. with a 
led that 
paramount problem of organized Base Ball — the umpire — unusually 




1, White; 2, Mock; 3, Humphrey: 4. Fox, Mgr.\ I Pipei 

7. Eichberger; S. I, Lallier; 10, Br: 11, Locke; 

12, Gowdy; 13, Reynolds; 14, Justus. 

LANCASTER TEAM. CHAMPIONS OHIO STATE LEAGUE. 

nd up the season with two of the imps? 

with which is a rare occurreu lays. 

His admin satisfactory that he was elected for 

another year. 

Les comprising the league — Lancaster. Mans- 
field. Newark and Marion — were members of the Ohio and Per.: 
vania League in 1 1907. and when the dissolution occui 

:• a long di Tangle, Lima and Springfield wc 

in a: te formed. 

; nnant in the new league. The race 
up to the last three weeks, when the *"Lapiks" took a 
their com: qh they w 

strong hitting team they had a pitching staff that is seldom equalled 
in a minor league in Justus. White and Mock, who pitc 



264 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



ball all season and all were drafted at the end. This trio of 
pitchers gained the distinction of working in six no-hit games during 
the season, Justus in four and White and Mock in one each. 

For a yearling the league was closely watched by the big league 
scouts and was badly shattered when the drafting season opened, 
losing more players than any Class C or D league in the country. 

The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders in 
Batting and Fielding in the Ohio State League in 1908, accord- 
ing to the official records, are given herewith. The complete 
official records are published in Spalding's Official Base Ball 
Record, for sale by all newsdealers, price 10 cents. 



STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 



Club. 
Lancaster 

Lima 

Marion . . . 



Won. 
. 92 


Lost. 
57 


. sa 


67 



PC. 

.617 

.544 
.523 



Club. Won. Lost. PC. 

Mansfield 76 73 .510 

Newark 74 75 .497 

Portsmouth 46 103 .309 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 



G. AB. R.H.SH.PC. 

140 528 63 169 18 .320 



Name and Club. 
Tate, Mar., 
Channel. Man., 137 4S3 71 151 16 .313 
Jewell, Man., 110 435 62 136 17 .313 

Ketter, Mar., 147 514 63 161 20 .311 



Name and Club. 
H. Bailey, Man., 
Craig, Mar., 
Kahl, Lima, 
Parson, Lima, 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 
FIRST BASEMEN. 



Name and Club. < 
Remolds, Man.-Lan., 
Crockett, Mar., 



PO. A. E. PC. 

L 422 15 8 .982 
3 258 9 5 .982 



G. AB. R.H.SH.PC. 

45 119 15 37 3 .311 
26 82 6 25 3 .305 
94 326 49 97 22 .297 
18 58 5 17 1 .293 



Name and Club. 
Sykes, Lima, 
Lotshaw, Mar., 



G. PO. A. E. PC. 
981 

9S1 



146 1427 86 
29 295 8 



Pinkney, New., 
Fink, Lima, 


41 78 109 4 .979|Wratten, New., 
89 ISO 233 15 .965|lvahl, Lima, 

THIRD BASEMEN. 


54 
61 


71 119 7 

165 157 14 


.964 
.958 


King. Mar., 
LaRue, Por.-Mar., 


49 61 119 10 .947 1 Heller, Lan., 
146 ISO 331 34 .939|Lallier, Lan., 

SHORTSTOPS. 


77 

68 


73 115 13 

66 103 12 


.935 
.934 


McClintock. New., 
Newnham, Lima, 


47 81 136 9 .9601 Humphreys, Lan., 
114 240 333 35 .942|0'D?.y, Mar., 


152 284 366 42 
40 S5 110 13 


.939 
.938 




OUTFIELDERS. 








Heller, Lan., 
Doyle, Por., 


70 119 3 1 .992|Farrell. Marion, 
3S 65 10 1 .9S7|Jackson, Lima, 

PITCHERS. 


125 
49 


256 7 5 
25 79 2 


.9S1 

.931 


Doyle. Por., 
Garvey, Lima, 


24 6 69 1000|Linke, Lima. 
23 7 43 1000IG. Fox, Marion, 


33 

16 


11 75 1 
2 47 1 


.989 

.980 



Geo. Fox. Lan., 
Luskey, Mar., 



Name and Club. 
White. Lan., 
Pickett, Lima, 



CATCHERS 
33 243 33 2 .993|Piper. Lan.. 119 710 106 18 .978 

76 407 76 8 .984,E. Reilly, Man. -Lima. 90 463 113 13 .978 



PITCHERS' RECORDS. 
G.BB.SO.W.L. PCI Name and Club. 
40 110 262 28 12 .700 Mock. Lan., 
34 68 108 21 9 .700 Parsons, Lima, 



G.BB.SO.W.L. PC. 

36 56 147 22 10 .688 
18 54 99 11 5 .688 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE 265 

Carolina Association 

By C. J. Lambe, Greensboro, N. C. 

The initial season of the Carolina Association from a sporting 
viewpoint was a splendid success, but financially it did not pan out 
so well as the promoters had hoped for, yet the encouragement 
they received caused them to hold a meeting in Charlotte shortly 
after the end of the season and map out plans for the season of 
1909. There was some talk at that time of making it an eight- 
town circuit instead of six, but, after considering the applications 
of Raleigh and Wilmington, the directors deemed it best to let the 
league remain as then constituted with teams in Greensboro, Wins- 




1, Sisson; 2, Anthony: 3, Cook; 4, Hammersley; 5, Couch; 6, Doak; 
7, Sharp; 8, Cogswell; 9, McKevitt, Mgr. : 10, Ties. Brandt; 11, Hicks; 
12, Walsh; 13, McCorriston; 14, Schmidt; 15, Moore, Mascot. 

Moose, Photo. 
GREENSBORO TEAM, CHAMPIONS CAROLINA ASSOCIATION. 

ton-Salem and Charlotte in North Carolina, and Spartanburg,. 
Greenville and Anderson in South Carolina. The fans in these six 
towns rallied nobly to the respective teams last season and the 
outlook for the season of 1909 is unusually bright. 

In the past season there were many exciting games, but probably 
the one in which the greatest interest centered was in the final 
series between Greensboro and Greenville at Greensboro, w T hen the 
standing of these two teams was so close that the championship 
was decided by the third game of the series of four, and Greens- 
boro captured the pennant, winding up the season with a standing 
of .573, w T hile Greenville's standing was .571. 

Among those who were drafted by or sold to higher class leagues, 
were Jackson and Barre of Greenville to the Athletics in Philadel- 




1, Pressly; 2, Clark; 3, Tribble; 4, Barr; 5, Jackson; 6, Scott; 7, 

Stouch, Mgr.; 8, McFarlin; 9, Quigley; 10, Brumfiold; 11, Laval: 12, 

Kelly; 13, Eskew, Mascot. Wheeler & Son, Photo. 

GREENVILLE TEAM— CAROLINA ASSOCIATION. 



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1, Newton; 2, Finn; 3, Brennan; 4, Schumaker; 5, Collins. Mgr.: 6, 
Fulenwider; 7, Noojin; 8, Drumm; 9, Sharpe; 10, Sherrill; 11, Hunter; 
12, Snedden. 

CHARLOTTE TEAM— CAROLINA ASSOCIATION. 




1, Reggy, Capt.; 2, Willis; 3, Oakley; 4, Fischman; 5, Rainwater; 
6, Corrigan; 7, Cooper; 8, Stoehr; 9, Woodward; 10, Clarke; 11, 
Schmick; 12, Dobson. 

ANDERSON TEAM— CAROLINA ASSOCIATION. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



267 



phia : Fulenweider. the Charlotte pitcher, to Little Rock: Jule 
Watson, the Greensboro boy who held clown third sack for Spartan- 
burg, goes to Mobile : Lindsay, the fast shortstop of Wins ton -Salem,, 
goes to Memphis : Stoehr and Cooper, who formed the Anderson 
battery, go to Roanoke : Martin. Spartanburg's shortstop, goes to 
Danville, in the Virginia League. These men more than "made 
good" in the Carolina Association, but they have all been replaced 
by fast players and the lovers of the national sport in the circuit 
will see faster ball than ever. 

The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders in 
Batting and Fielding in the Carolina Association in 1908, accord- 
ing to the official records, are given herewith. The complete 
official records are published in Spalding's Official Base Ball 
Record, for sale by all newsdealers, price 10 cents. 



STANDING Oi 
Club. Won. 

Greensboro 51 

Greenville 48 

Spartanburg 49 



' CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 

Lost. PC! Club. Won. Lost. 

38 .5731 Winston 41 48 

36 .571 Charlotte 40 47 

39 .557 Anderson 32 53 



Name and Club. 
Jackson, Gve.. 
Watson.Jule,S., 
Hess, W., 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 
G. AB. R. H.SH.PC. I Name and Club. 
.346 Carter. W., 
.341 Barre, Gve.. 



87 347 
90 331 



43 120 .. 
49 113 .. 



G. AB. 

94 350 



17 50 



16 



.320,Hornhorst, A., 42 157 



R.H.SH 

59 111 20 
62 98 11 
18 46 .. 



re. 

.461 
.460' 
.376- 



PC 



.29S> 
.295 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 
FIRST BASEMEN. 
Name and Club. G. TO. A. E. PC.| Name and Club. 
Hicks, Gbo., 20 204 17 2 .991jPressly, Gve., 



G. PO. A. E. PC. 

32 355 10 6 .984 



Scott, Gve., 


59 


625 


18 


9 .986lBenbow, S., 


45 


450 


17 


8 


.983= 








SECOND BASEMEN. 












Brennan. C, 
Corrigan, A., 


55 
26 


164 
72 


168 
44 


12 .965|Stouch, Gve.. 
7 .943iSharp, Gbo.-C, 


74 
54 


169 
129 


237 

128 


25 
17 


.942 
.938 








THIRD BASEMEN. 












Bowers, W., 
Betscher, A., 


43 

24 


63 
39 


96 
67 


12 .9 301 Watson. Jule, S., 
9 . 922 1 Woodward, W., 

SHORTSTOPS. 


90 
27 


114 
31 


210 
51 


30 
8 


.915 
.911 


Reggy. A.. 
Lindsay, W., 


59 
68 


152 
148 


187 
240 


23 .937|Hicks, Gbo., 

30 .928|Brumfield, Gve., 

OUTFIELDEPS. 


73 

82 


185 
150 


232 
215 


4 2 
3S 


.909 
.906 


Foley. C. 
Pressly, Gve., 


33 

21 


53 
27 


4 
1 


1000'Drumm. C. 
lOOOJBenbow, S., 

CATCHERS. 


17 
17 


19 
15 


1 
2 







1000 
1000 


Hes:, W., 
Hobbs, L., W., 


17 
46 


92 
229 


9 
46 


10001 Walsh. Gbo., 
3 .989|Sherrill, C, 

PITCHERS. 


87 
50 


347 
322 


119 
49 


8 


.9S3 
.9S2 


McGill. W.. 
Fulenwider, C, 


20 
20 


13 
3 


48 
50 


2 .968|Willis. A.. 
2 .9641 McDonald, S., 


23 
19 


13 
10 


60 
37 


3 

2 


.961 
.959 



Name and Club. 
Fulenwider. C. 
Hammersley, Gbo., 



PITCHERS' RECORDS. 

G. W L. T. PC. Name and Club. 
18 13 4 1 .765 McFarlin; Gve., 
32 22 S 2 .733 Barre, Gve., 



G. W. L. T. PC. 

*24 16 S .667 
IS 12 6 .667 




1, McAleese; z, McCofmiek; 3, McGinty; 4, Elm; 5, Gribben; 6, S. 
Dawson; 7, Lower: 8. Welch, Vice-Pres. ; 9, Drumm, Mgr.; 10, An- 
derson, Bus. Mgr.: 11, McKenna; 12, J. Dawson; 13, Miller; 14, 
McAvoy: 15. Fletcher: 16, Conway; 17, Wilson. The Ideal. Photo. 

CLARKSBURG TEAM— PENN.-WEST VIRGINIA LEAGUE. 




1, Losgrove, Uapt.; 2, \\ . Humphries; 3, May; 4, Heinz; 5, Coulson; 
6, O'Hare; 7, McCleary; 8, Osborne. Mgr.; 9, Dunn; 10, B. Hum- 
phries: 11, Toohey; 12. Houser; 13, Nalley; 14, Daley. 

CHARLEROI TEAM— PENN.-WEST VIRGINIA LEAGUE. 




1, Ellam; 2, Blanchard; 3. Jacobson; 4, Tiffany; 5, Francis; 6, Ctotter; 

7, Cannon: 8. Montgomery, Mgr.; 9, Price; 10, Birmingham; 11, 

Wallace: 12. Montgomery, Mascot: 13. Lawton. Chircosta, Photo. 

CONNELLSVILLE TEAM— PENN.-WEST VIRGINIA LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



269 



Pennsylvania-West Virginia League 

The Pennsylvania and West Virginia League composed of Union- 
town, Clarksburg-, Charleroi, Connellsville, Fairmont and Scottdale 
, opened its initial campaign on May 1, closing on September 12 
with the clubs finishing in the order named. Charleroi took the 



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1, Walters; 2, Cromley; 3, Jenkins; 4, Carlisle; 5, Hunt; 6. Gates; 
7, King; 8, Core; 9, Pies. Haymond; 10, Parker; 11, Fisher; 12, 
Haught; 13, Keener; 14, Snodgrass, Mgr. ; 15, Jackley, 

FAIRMONT TEAM— PENN.- WEST VIRGINIA LEAGUE. 

lead from the first and maintained it until June with Clarksburg 
and Uniontown consistently gaining until McClosky's Uniontown 
bunch moved into first place, from which time they, in turn, were 
compelled to fight every inch of the way in order to nose out the 



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1, James; 2. Andrews; 3, Jenkins, Umpire; 4, Jenkins; 5, Mcllvaine; 
6, Cornelius: 7, Hazleton; S. Jacobson; 9, Vice-Pres. Hartley; 10, 
King; 11. Pres. Souders; 12, Ganier; 13, Sec. Schuster; 14, Ferguson; 
15, Bouldin; 16, Bail. 

GRAFTON TEAM— PENN.-WEST VIRGINIA LEAGUE. 



270 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



Clarksburg club, which they finally succeeded in doing by the very 
close margin of twenty-seven points. ^ 

On July 29 Scottdale was compelled to surrender its franchise 
and the club was transferred to Grafton. Considering the many 
disadvantages under which Connellsville, Fairmont and Grafton 
were placed it must be conceded that they played remarkably good** 
"ball and proved to be a constant menace to the first division 
contenders. 

The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders in 
.Batting and Fielding in the Pennsylvania- West Virginia League in 
1908, according to the official records, are given herewith. The 
complete official records are published in Spalding's Official Base 
Ball Record, for sale by all newsdealers, price 10 cents. 



STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 
Club. Won. Lost. PC. I Club. Won. Lost. 

Uniontown 68 41 .624 Connellsville 54 56 

Clarksburg 71 48 .597 Fairmont 55 64 



Charleroi 61 



58 



.513 Grafton 36 80 



FC. 

.491 
.462 
.310 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 

Name and Club. G. AB. R. 1B.SH.PC.I Name and Club. G. AB. R. 1B.SH.PC. 

Phillips, Un., 98 349 53 107 10 .307 Gainear, Graf., 27 103 13 31 1 .301 

Elliott, Char., 34 131 8 40 5 .305 Zurlage, Fair.. 48 ISO 20 54 5 .300 

Toohey, Char., 24 S6 5 26 2 .302|Jacobson, Graf., 101 405 57 119 7 .294 



Name and Club. 
Fisher, Fair., 
Price, Un., 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 
FIRST BASEMEN. 



G. PO. A. E. PC. 

54 486 47 9 .984 
84 798 49 14 .984 



Name and Club. 
Heintz. Char., 
Conway, Clark., 



G. PO. A. E. PC. 

92 874 28 19 .979 
10S 1284 41 31 .977 



SECOND BASEMEN. 
McCloskey. Un., 73 160 230 11 .973|Drumm, Clark., 

Cosgrdve, Char., 99 148 297 13 .972|McCombs, Clark., 



39 64 96 7 .958 
50 113 149 14 .949 



King. Graf., 
Hilley, Un., 



THIRD BASEMEN. 

56 87 90 10 .946iO'Connor, G., 38 162 29 15 
96 317 111 25 .945|Gates, Fair., 101 133 197 2S 



Dunn. Char., 
King, Fair., 



SHORTSTOPS. 
74 146 222 19 .9511 Guest, Fair., 
84 163 226 20 .95l!Ellani, Conn., 



36 57 121 11 .942 
105 344 360 48 .936 



Washer, Graf., 
O'Hara, Char., 



19 49 
55 117 



OUTFIELDERS. 

4 lOOOIMcKenna, Clark., 
4 2 .9S4 1 Phillips, Un., 



30 52 3 1 .9S2 
28 195 21 4 .982 



Jackson, Graf., 
McCormick, Clark., 



PITCHERS. 
29 23 3S 1 .984! Andrews, Graf., 
24 33 69 2 .9SllFletcher, Clarks., 



12 5 29 1 .971 
15 2 28 1 .968 



Jackley. Fair.. 
Snodgrass. Fair., 



CATCHERS. 
71 299 47 4 .9S9|Frankenberry, Un.. 
83 417 70 7 .9S6lMay. Char., 



56 333 53 6 .985 
2S 111 16 2 .9S4 




1, E. N. Walker, President Oakland Club, Pacific Coast League; 2, 
Judge W. W. McCredie, President Portland Club, Pacific Coast 
Leaeue; 3, R. P. Brown, Secretary and Manager Aberdeen Club, 
Northwestern League; 4, D. E. Dugdale, President Seattle Club, 
Northwestern League; 5, George M. Shreeder, President and Man- 
ager Tacoma Club, Northwestern League. 

- A GROUP OF MINOR LEAGUE CLUB OFFICIALS. 




1, J. H. Clarkin, President Hartford; 2, P. H. Prindiville, President 
Holyoke; 3. H. R. Durant. President and Manager Waterbury; 4, 
James H. O'Rourke. President and Manager Bridgeport; 5, Daniel 
O'Neil, President and Manager Springfield: 6. C. H. Cheney, Presi- 
dent Meriden; 7, Thomas Dowd, Manager Hartford. 

A GROUP OF CONNECTICUT LEAGUE CLUB OFFICIALS. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

Connecticut League 



273 



As in many other Base Ball organizations in 1908— major and minor— 
the championship race of the Connecticut League narrowed down 
to a last-week-of-the-season finish, the Springfield (Mass.) team pass- 
ing the Hartford club and winning by a margin of only five points. 




1. McLean: 2. Yale: 3. Stankard; 4, Powell: 5. Luby: 6. Hess: 7, 
Maggert: 8. Waite; 9. Dan O'Neil. Owner and Mgr. ; 10. Rising; 11, 
Connors; 12, Burns; 13, Parker; 14, McAndrews; 15, Hirst. 

SPRINGFIELD TEAM. CHAMPIONS CONNECTICUT LEAGUE. 

Both teams were far ahead of the other six comprising the organi- 
zation and practically fought it out among themselves during the 
last portion of the schedule. There was a strong rivalry between 
the various cities, and the season was a success financially. 

The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders in 
Batting and Fielding in the Connecticut League in 190S, accord- 






111 i i if 



1, Connery: 2. Clarkin. Prop.: 3. Noyes: 4, O'Leary; 5, Gardner: 6, 

Justice: 7. Casey: 9, Fallon: 10. Wallace; 11. Swan son: 12, Wilson; 

13, Yancey: 14. Evans; 15. Schunian. Oliver, Photo. 

HARTFORD TEAM— CONNECTICUT LEAGUE. 




1, Pleiss; 2, Havel; 3, Duggan; 4, Corcoran; 5. Bone, Mgr. : 6, 
Herbst: 7, Hay ward: 8. Zacher: 9. Waters; 10, Connell; 11, Wilhelm; 
12, Sherwood: 13. Simmons: 14, Noire. 

NEW HAVEN TEAM— CONNECTICUT LEAGUE. 




1, Seanlon; 2, Danahey: 3. Dolan: 4, Ahearn: 5, Rorty; 6, Massey; 
7. Lavender: 8. Baker: 9. Perkins; 10. Burke: 11. Reiger; 12, 
Sindler; 13, Winkler; 14, Hodge; 15, Hambacher: 16, Boucher. 
HOLYOKE TEAM— CONNECTICUT LEAGUE. 



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1, McNulty: 2. Farley: 3, Singleton; 4, Kelly: 5, Fitzpatrick; 6, 
Nichols: 7. Ward: 8. Howard: 9. Bronslie: 10. Wiggins: 11. Rogers; 
12, Slosher: 13. Lucia: 14. Rice: 15. Leen; 16, Swander; 17, McEnroe; 
18, Shincel; 19. Barrett; 20. Ccsey. 

WATERBURY TEAM— CONNECTICUT LEAGUE, 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



275 



ing to the official records, are given herewith. The complete 
official records are published in Spalding's Official Base Ball 
Record., for sale by all newsdealers, price 10 cents. 

STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 

Club. Won. Lost. PC. Club. Won. Lost. FC. 

Sprinsrfield 84 41 .672 Holyoke 60 66 .473 

Hartford S4 42 .667 Bridgeport 55 71 .437 

New Haven 63 63 . 500 Meriden 54 72 .429 

New Britain 61 64 .4SS AVaterbury 42 S4 .333 

CHAMPIONSHIP WINNERS IN PREVIOUS SEASONS. 

1S97— Meriden 684 1903— Holvoke 632 

- W aterbury 623 1904— Bridgeport 612 

-New Haven 591 1905— Holyoke 699 

—Norwich 660 1906— Norwich 576 

1901— Bristol 606 1907— Holyoke 664 

1902— New Haven 642, 



Name and Club. 
McCabe. N.B.. 
O'Rourke, B.. 
Simmons. N.H., 
Padron, N.B., 
Maggart, S., 
Rising, S.. 
Ha., 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 
G. AB. R. H.SH.PC; Name and Club. 
120 453 53 145 20 .320 Gardner. Ha., 
93 371 59 118 4 .318 Soffel. M., 

.313 Stankard, S., 
.313 Ladd. B.. 
.312 Almeida. N.B., 
Nops. B.. 



G. AB. R. H.SH.PC. 



IS 496 78 155 
76 204 34 64 
58 211 37 66 
123 465 73 143 
16 46 2 14 



111 453 63 137 


20 


.302 


121 468 72 139 


7 


.297 


122 476 71 141 


18 


.296 


127 448 59 144 


18 


.:? r 


86 326 50 95 


16 


.291 


13 31 1 9 


2 


.290 



304 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 
FIRST BASEMEN. 
Name and Club. G. PO. A. E. PC.i Name and Club. G. PO. A. 
Connerv. Ha.. 126 1249 49 12 .991 Yale. S.. 127 1324 67 

Massey. Ho., 124 1444 43 18 .9SSiLachance.W.-N.H. 65 665 25 



E. PC. 

17 .988 
10 .9S6 



Gardner. Ha., 
Burns, N.B.. 


Ill 
124 


236 
340 


Noyes. Ha.. 
Connaughton.N 


B. 15 


19 


Cabrera. N.B.. 
Burns. S., 


65 
1 




Pleiss, N.H.. 
Wallace. Ha.. 


60 


65 


Fisher. Ha., 
Nops, B., 


16 
13 


1 



Armbruster. Ho.. 24 
Conn.: i 109 



Name and Club. 
Fisher. Ha., 
Parke: 



SECOND BASEMEN. 

.970 Havel. N.H., 
357 26 .964, Rogers, B.. 

THIRD BASEMEN. 
224 34 .919 Barbour. M., 
35 5 .915i Murphy. W., 

SHORTSTOPS. 

~ .923 Justice. Ha.. 
325 48 .918. Singleton. W., 

OUTFIELDERS. 
4 5 .976: Ladd. B.. 
8 2 .975|Rodgers, Ho., 

PITCHERS. 

45 1.000'Tuckev. M., 

27 1.000 Reiger, NB-Ha. 

CATCHERS. 

22 1 .992 Casey. Ha.. 
113 9 .9SS ; Sehincil, W., 

PITCHERS' RECORDS. 



29 
35 



127 182 2^9 
76 111 205 



125 233 361 
33 57 108 



127 
43 



£1 
30 



.949 



.911 
.911 



.914 
.906 



8 .973 

- 



.991 
.9S5 



65 441 60 7 
104 440 173 17 



G. 
13 
26 



Name and Club. 
Tuckey. M., 
Powell, S., 



G. W. 
25 19 
28 20 8 .714 



L. PC. 

6 .760 




1, Briswalter; 2, Nagle: 3, Gray: 4. Hosp; 5, Kocstner: 6, Thorsen; 
7, Hogan: S, W. H. Berry. Mgr. : 9, Dillon. Capr. : 10. Easterly; 11, 
Phillips; 12. Wheeler; 13. Howard: 14. Delmas; 15, Smith; 16, Ber- 
nard; 17, Ellis; 18, Cakes: 19. Brashear. 

Copyright, 19<>S. by Central Studio. Los Angeles. 
LOS ANGELES TEAM, CHAMPIONS PACIFIC COAST LEAGUE. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

Pacific Coast League 



27? 



i^or the second successive year Manager Berry's Los Angeles team 
w-tptured the pennant of the Pacific Coast League, in the ninth 
* annual championship race of that organization. Unlike the contests 
in many other leagues last year, the race was not close enough 
after the middle of the season to warrant any doubt as to the 
ultimate result. Portland, the runner-up, made a good start, and 
hopes were entertained at one time that the honor would go to the 
North, but the Los Angeles pace finally proved too strong. San 
Francisco finished within sight of Portland, with Oakland far behind. 
Los Angeles made her best gains against San Francisco and Oak- 
land, Portland beating her in their series. Portland was absolutely 




1, Cook; 2, Van Haltren; 3, Nelson; 4, Heitmuller; 5, Pres. Walter; 
6, Miller; 7, Eagan; 8, Slattery; 9, Cornell, Trainer; 10, Lewis; 11, 
Hogan; 12, Truesdale; 13, Christian; 14, LaLonge; 15, Wright. 
OAKLAND TEAM— PACIFIC COAST LEAGUE. 

Dorsaz, Photo. 

impartial, as far as possible, in her treatment of the other three- 
teams, winning 31 from Los Angeles and 32 each from San Francisco 
and Oakland. . 

Financially the season was successful, and good sport was furnished 
by all the teams. A great deal of the credit of winning the long- 
race by the Los Angeles team must be given to Manager Berry and 
Captain Frank Dillon, their popular personality and ability being 
rewarded in the work of the players and the support accorded the 

team by the public. 

The standmg of the clubs and the averages of the leaders m 
Batting and Fielding in the Pacific Coast League in 1908, accord- 
ing to the official records, are given herewith. The complete 



•278 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



official records are published in Spalding's Official Base Ball 
.Record, for sale by all newsdealers, price 10 cents. 



STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 



Club. Won. Lost. PC. 

Los Angeles 110 78 .585 

Portland 95 90 .513 



Club. Won. Lost. PC. 

San Francisco 100 104 .490 

Oakland 83 116 .417 



CHAMPIONSHIP WINNERS IN PREVIOUS YEARS. 

1903— Los Angeles 630(1906— Portland 

1904— Tacoma 589U907— Los Angeles 

1905— Tacoma (first series) 583) r nlav-off Los Ansreles W( 

1905— Los Angeles (second series) .604) in piay on: L0S An S eies w< 



.657 
.608 



INDIVIDUAL 

Name and Club. G. AB. R. H. SH.PC. 

Slattery, Oak., 99 360 37 119 6 .331 

Easterley, L.A., 123 376 53 116 23 .309 



BATTING. 

Name and Club. G. AB. R. H. SH.rC. 
Danzig, Por., 180 685 92 204 25 .298 



Name and Club. 
Dillon, L.A., 
IHogan, Oak., 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 
FIRST BASEMEN. 



G. PO. A. E. PC. 

168 1585 133 22 .987 



Name and Club. 
Williams, S.F., 
Slattery, Oak., 



G. PO. A. E. PC. 

198 2028 137 30 .986 
33 303 25 7 .979 



Casey, Por., 
Wheeler, L.A., 



SECOND BASEMEN. 
174 360 495 41 .953|Mohler, S.F., 
43 88 1S4 13 .945|Altman, Oak., 



201 591 533 69 .942 
24 61 80 9 .940 



McCay, Oak., 
McArdle, S.F., 



THIRD BASEMEN. 

17 31 25 4 .950 1 Johnson, Por., 
156 225 315 31 .946 1 Airman, Oak., 



131 188 277 35 .930 
83 134 206 24 .929 



SHORTSTOPS. 
Delmas, L.A.. 177 305 586 78 .920]Zeider, S.F., 

Cooney, Por., 180 336 577 79 .920lEagan, Oak. ; 



201 386 611 96 .913 
156 259 444 75 .904 



OUTFIELDERS. 
Henley, S.F., 17 19 10 1000|Beck, S.F., 

Melchoir, S.F., 178 291 32 8 .976| Van Haltren, Oak., 



97 241 20 8 .970 
186 378 48 14 .969 



PITCHERS. 
Berger, S.F., 11 2 6 lOOOiLoucks, Oak., 

Wright, Oak., 41 33 110 4 .973 1 Griffin, S.F., 



29 11 90 3 .971 
14 10 19 1 .967 



CATCHERS. 

Name and Club. G. PO. A. E. PB.PC. I Name and Club. G. PO. A. E. PB.PC. 

<C. Lewis, Oak., 82 333 121 13 8 .972|Killifer, S.F., 25 104 19 4 1 .968 

Lalonge, Oak., 98 515 146 21 12 .969, Slattery, Oak., 66 202 100 14 2 .965 



PITCHERS' 
Name and Club. W. 

Browning, San Francisco 9 

Briswalter, Los Angeles 13 



^Nagle, Los Angeles 24 



<Jray, Los Angeles. 



26 



RECORDS. 
j. T. R. 

2 23 



SO. BB. HB. WP. B. PC. 

1 .818 



80 46 
99 82 
249 158 



.722 
3 ^706 
.703 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



279 



Texas League 



STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF 



Club. Won. Lost. 

San Antonio 95 48 

Dallas 90 55 

Houston 77 67 

Waco 71 72 



SEASON. 

Won. Lost. 
68 74 



Name and Club. 

Salm, F. W., 103 375 57 114 

Griggs, S. A., 118 435 60 132 

Maloney, D., 147 560 71 169 

Westerzil, S.A., 58 176 22 53 



PC. Club. 

.664 Fort Worth 68 

.620 Shre report 66 

.535 Galveston 59 

.497 Austin 49 

Championship team 1907, Austin. 

INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 
G.AB. E. H. SH. PC. Name and Club. G. AB. R. H 



Stovall, S.A., 
Wallace, H., 
Sentz, F.W., 



136 525 82 156 
116 415 54 121 
71 282 37 82 



SH. 

13 
18 
3 



Name and Club. 
Mickle, A., 
Lauzon, G., 

Murphy, F.W., 
Th'p'n, SA-FW, 

Stark, S.A., 
Pend'ton, SA-FW, 

Markley, S.A., 
Hartman, F.W. 



Griffin, F.W., 
Pulliam, F.W., 



Nelson, H-W., 
McGill, A., 



Alexander, S.A., 
Wick, F.W., 



Name and Club. 
Griffin, F.W., 
Burns, S.A., 



A. E. 

58 18 
53 36 



77 
211 



54 
378 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 
FIRST BASEMEN. 
G. PO. A. E. PC! Name'and Club. G. PO. 
112 1010 60 18 .9S3jWeikart, G., 84 848 

18 113 6 2 .9S3jNewnam, S.A., 147 1467 

SECOND BASEMEN. 
33 76 86 7 .959|Adams, A., 28 64 50 

139 346 316 29 .958|Griggs, S.-S.A., 107 208 258 
THIRD BASEMEN. 
30 37 63 3 .971 [Hoffman, W.-S., 33 

78 115 168 10 .966JFirestine, A., 109 

SHORTSTOPS. 
142 233 359 42 .934|Mowry, H., 20 

142 317 417 54 .931 [Fletcher, D., 147 

OUTFIELDERS. 
22 33 1000!Collins, S.A., 129 

53 77 9 1 .9S9jThebo, S., 135 

PITCHERS. 

11 1 22 lOOOlCasey, A., 21 

10 3 6 1000|Galbraith,FW-S, 14 

CATCHERS. 

79 453 83 3 .9941 Petit, S., 100 
87 416 96 7 .987!Kiilifer, A., 54 

PITCHERS' RECORDS. 
G. W. L. T. PC. I Name and Club. G. W. L. T. 

32 23 9 .719|Harris, S.A., 31 22 9 

14 10 4 .714|Cooper, D., 31 22 9 

Interstate League 



PC. 
.479 

.458 
.407 
.340 



PC. 

.297 
.291 
.291 



PC. 

.979 
.977 

.958 
.957 

.962 



217 
299 



236 



44 
30 



.903 

.901 

.9S7 
.985 

.983 
.974 

.979 

.978 

PC. 
.710 
.710 



The Interstate League, which opened its championship season on May 13, 
closed on June 7, owing to bad weather and other causes. 
STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE. 

Name and Club. Won. Lost. PC. | Name and Club. Won. Lost. PC. 

Olean 16 2 .889'Franklin 8 13 .381 

Warren 11 8 .579lOil City 6 11 .353 

Bradford 12 9 .572iErie 4 14 .222 

CHAMPIONSHIP WINNERS IN PREVIOUS YEARS. 

1905— Coudersport 603[1906— Erie 613- 

1907— Oil City 



280 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



Northern League 



STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 
Club. Won. Lost. PCI Club. Won. Lost. 

Brandon 50 31 .617|Duluth 45 45 

Winnipeg 47 33 .588|Fargo 23 56 

CHAMPIONSHIP WINNERS IN PREVIOUS YEARS. 

1902— Winnipeg 11905— Duluth 

1903— Winnipeg 1906— Calumet 



PC. 

.500 
.291 



.653 
.620 



1904— Duluth 11907— Winnipeg 755 



Name and Club. G.AB. 

L.C. Piper, Win. 35 141 

W. Crum, Win., 65 245 

G.Metzgar,Win., 83 302 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 

Name and Club. 
Giencke, Win., 
Sturgeon, Far., 

INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 



R. 


H. SH.PC. 


41 


52 3 .369 


46 


84 25 .343 


49 


83 15 .342 



G.AB. R. H. SH.PC. 

46 122 15 40 6 .320 
37 127 22 37 5 .292 



FIRST BASEMEN. 



Name and Club. G. TO 
D. Williams, Duluth, 
O'Dea, Brandon, 



A. E. PC. 

71 432 20 6 .989 
49 607 17 9 .986 



King, Winnipeg, 
O'Brien, Dul., 



Metzger, Winnipeg, 
Brookins, Fargo, 



Leighty, Brandon, 
Sensenbach, Winnipeg 



Bond. Winnipeg, 
Carroll, Duluth, 



Smith. Brandon, 
Nelson, Brandon, 



Custer. Bran., 
Ulrich, Win., 



Name and Club. 
Nelsom. Brandon, 
Thorson, Duluth, 



Name and Club. 
Beatty, Winnipeg, 
Burke, Fargo, 

SECOND BASEMEN. 

79 169 196 23 .94l|Livingston, Brandon, 
89 278 240 35 .937 1 Godfrey, Fargo, 

THIRD BASEMEN. 

83 158 188 21 .9411 Thompson, Fargo, 
65 74 131 13 .94l|Westcott, Duluth, 

SHORTSTOPS. 

80 105 225 34 .915'Clevinger, Fargo, 
67 138 173 36 .897|Koepping, Duluth, 

OUTFIELDERS. 

30 41 11 1000 1 Crum, Winnipeg, 
25 40 9 1 .980 1 Piper, Winnipeg, 

PITCHERS. 

24 12 60 3 .960fBrandt, Duluth, 
48 37 70 5 .956|Krick, Duluth, 

CATCHERS. 
63 318 85 5 .988|Pratt, Duluth, 
69 249 63 7 .985|Sheehan, Fargo, 

PITCHERS' RECORDS. 
G. W. L. PCI Name and Club. 
22 17 5 .773 Theobald. Winnipeg, 
14 10 4 .715iGiencke, Winnipeg, 



G. PO. A. E. PC. 

78 417 59 23 .938 



80 173 174 26 .931 
56 101 68 20 .894 



80 170 177 36 .907 
21 22 59 10 .890 



32 35 101 20 .872 
66 121 118 37 .866 



65 144 25 6 .978 
35 75 8 2 .977 



30 3 88 5 .948 
29 17 88 7 .938 



60 279 84 9 .976 
46 255 70 21 .940 



G. W. L. PC. 

16 11 5 .688 
22 15 7 .677 



Blue Grass League 

STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 



Club. Won. Lost. PC 

Frankfort 47 

Lexington 37 

{Richmond 36 



23 


.671 


31 


.544 


34 


.514 



Club. Won. Lost. 

Lawrenceburg 33 35 

Shelbyville 32 37 

Winchester 22 47 



PC. 

.485 
.464 
.319 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



281 




Frank Herman 

President 



California State League 

The California State League, one of 
the most formidable outlaw Base Ball 
organizations in existence, had a most 
successful season during 1908, and the 
outcome of the race was in doubt up 
to the very last games of the season. 
As it was, Stockton, four times pennant 
winners, annexed first place by the close 
margin of but 12 points. 

The league this year branched out 
into an eight-club organization, Fresno 
and Santa Cruz being admitted. Both 
of the new clubs had but a short time 
in which to skirmish around for talent, 
and, while they secured high-class play- 
ers, the necessary team-work was lack- 
ing, and after the first few months they 
were out of the running. Alameda, 
Oakland and San Francisco were hope- 
lessly outclassed, but Sacramento, with 
California State League its collection of stars, was an important 
factor right up to the final month, when a slight slump put 
them out of the race. San Jose, while not having quite as 
many high-salaried or as classy men as Stockton, put up a 
great fight. The probability is that if the Stockton manage- 
ment hadn't engaged Hal Chase to strengthen the club at the 
wind-up, first place would have been captured by the Prune 
Pickers. 

A glance at the following names serve to show what a strong 
organization this outlaw league is, as most of them are capable 
of holding their own in almost any Base Ball society. On the 
Stockton team there were such shifty players as Hal Chase, 
Danny Shay, Bill Moriarity, Ben Henderson, "Doc" Moskiman, 
Tom Hackett, Jimmy Smith and Jimmy McHale. Sacramento 
had Joe Nealon, Jimmy Whalen, Fred Brown, Fred Raymer, 
Jimmy Byrnes, Charlie Graham, Jansing, Doyle, Hopper and 
Enright. San Jose had Elmer Stricklett, Harry Wolters and 
Bob Eager. Fresno had Spider Baum, Roscoe Miller, Ed Ken- 
nedy, Mott, Spencer and Blankenship. 

The officers of the California State League are : President, 
Frank Herman, San Francisco ; vice-president, Fred W. Swanton, 
Santa Cruz ; secretary-treasurer, Cy Moreing, Jr., Stockton. 

The standing of the clubs and the averages of the leaders 
in Batting and Fielding in the California State League in 
1908, according to the official records, are given herewith. 
The complete official records are published in Spalding's 
Official Base Ball Record, for sale by all newsdealers, 
price 10 cents. 



STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 



Club. Won. Lost. P.C. 

Stockton 62 17 .785 

San Jose 58 17 .773 

Sacramento 55 20 .733 

Fresno 47 31 603 



Club. Won. Lost. P.C. 

Santa Cruz 60 46 .566 

Alameda 24 50 .324 

San Francisco 9 67 .118 

Oakland 4 71 .053 



282 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 



Name and Club. G. 

Chase, Stock., 21 

Nealon, Sac, 62 

Hooper, Sac., 77 

Wolters, S. Jose, 74 

Happy Smith, S.J. 65 

Collins, S.Cruz, 98 



AB. R. IB. SB. PC. 

81 20 31 5 .385 

231 39 86 6 .372 

294 47 101 41 .344 

283 66 96 27 .339 

249 38 83 14 .333 

349 65 116 19 .332 



Name and Club. G. 
Shinn, S. Cruz, 105 
Devereaux, S.Cruz 96 
Enright, Sac, 76 

Garibaldi, S.C.-F., 50 
Haley, S.Cruz, 51 

Blankenship,Fres. 65 



AB. R.1B.SB. 

377 81 119 53 
316 53 99 20 



304 58 
175 27 
189 40 
224 35 



93 25 
53 19 
57 26 
67 34 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 
FIRST BASEMEN. 



Name and Club. 
Nealon, Sac, 
Kennedy, Fresno, 

Raymer, Sac, 
Shay, Stockton, 

Hallinan, Alameda, 
Schiinpff, S. Cruz, 

Waters, Santa Cruz, 
Iverson, Sac-S.Cruz, 

Reid, San Jose, 
Kennedy, Fresno, 

Moskiman, Stock., 
Deparade, San Fr., 

Graham, Sac, 
Kuhn, S.Fr. -Fresno, 

Name and Club. 
Wolters, San Jose, 
Henderson, Stock., 



G. PO. A. E. PC. 

62 625 46 9 .987 
48 544 17 12 .979 
SECOND 

54 157 159 9 .972 
74 180 214 13 .968 



Name and Club. 
Wulzen, Oakland, 
Chase, Stockton, 
BASEMEN. 
Randolph, Alameda, 
Kelley, Fresno, 
THIRD BASEMEN. 
56 88 115 12 .944iShinn, Santa Cruz, 
15 22 24 3 .939]Lacey, San Jose, 

SHORTSTOPS. 
26 65 78 9 .941|Streib, San Jose, 
60 86 204 22 .929|Schimpff, S. C.-Fres. 

OUTFIELDERS. 
66 100 2 1000 (Lewis, Alameda, 

26 34 5 lOOOICroll, Fresno-Sac, 

PITCHERS. 
35 31 129 1 .9941 Pierce, S. Cruz- Ala., 
11 5 34 1 .975|Stricklett, San Jose, 

CATCHERS. 

27 173 37 2 .9911 Eager, S. Jose, 

19 100 24 2 .984|Blankenship, Fresno, 
PITCHERS' RECORDS. 

Won. Lost. PC. I Name and Club. 
25 2 .926 Whalen, Sac, 

35 5 .875lArrellanes, S. C.-S. J. 



G.PO. A. E. 

29 309 11 7 
21 208 10 5 

10 24 27 2 
76 193 215 23 



27 13 7 
95 138 20 



PC 

.316 
.313 
.306 
.303 
.302 
.299 



PC. 

.979 



.962 

.947 



.928 
.921 



75 158 224 37 .912 

38 98 100 19 .912 

38 58 9 1 .985 

59 116 6 3 .976 

27 8 64 2 .973 

35 18 147 5 .971 

57 340 65 10 .976 

59 268 61 10 .971 

Won. Lost. PC. 

31 8 .795 

10 3 .714 



Atlantic Association 

This New England organization opened May 2 and closed May 21. 



Club. 
Lewiston . 
Pawtucket 
Portland . 



Won. Lost. P.C. 

,... 8 3 ,727 

.... 6 3 .667 

...6 3 .667 



Club. Won. Lost. TC. 

Newport 4 4 .500 

Attleboro 1 11 .083 

Woonsocket 1 .000 

International League 

Th.3 International League opened its season May 20 and played 
until the last of July. 

Club. Won. Lost. PC. I Club. Won. Lost. PC. 

Hamilton 22 18 .550 London 20 21 .489 

St. Thomas 22 20 .524 I Niagara Falls 19 24 .432 



Maine League 



The Maine League started its season with Portland, Bangor, Pine 

Tree, Biddeford, York Beach and Lewiston, and disbanded August 28. 

Club. Won. Lost. PC. I Club. Won. Lost. PC. 

Portland 32 20 .615 Augusta 20 26 .435 

Bangor 31 22 .585 Biddeford 18 30 .375 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



283 



Pennant Winners in 1908 



Leagues 



American League 

National League 

American Association 

Arkansas League 

Central League 

Carolina Association 

Connecticut League 

Cotton States League 

Central Association 

Eastern League 

Eastern Carolina League 

I.-I.-I. League 

Illinois-Missouri League 

New York State League 

New England League 

Northwestern League 

Ohio State League 

Oklahoma-Kansas League 

Ohio-Pennsylvania League 

Pacific Coast League 

Pennsylvania- W. Va. League. 

Southern Association , 

South Atlantic League , 

South Carolina League 

Southern Michigan League 

Tri-State League , 

Texas League 

Virginia League 

Western Association 

Western League 

Wisconsin-Illinois League 

Blue Grass (member for 1909) . 



Champions 



Detroit, Mich 

Chicago, 111 

Indianapolis, Ind. . . 
Hot Springs, Ark. . 

Evansville, Ind 

Greensboro, N. C 
Springfield, Mass . . 

Jackson, Miss 

Waterloo, Iowa. . . . 

Baltimore, Md 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Springfield, HI 

Hannibal, Mo 

Scranton, Pa 

Worcester, Mass. . . 
Vancouver, B. C. . . 

Lancaster, O 

Tulsa, Oklahoma. . . 

Akron, O 

Los Angeles, Cal. . . 
Union town, Pa. 
Nashville, Tenn. 

Jacksonville, Fla 

Sumter, S. C , 

Saginaw, Mich , 

Williamsport, Pa... 
San Antonio, Tex. . . 

Richmond, Va 

Topeka, Kans 

Sioux City. Iowa 

Wausau, Wis 

Frankfort, Ky 




LEAGUES NOT COMPLETING SCHEDULE. 



Atlantic Association 

Eastern Illinois League., 

Gulf Coast League 

Inter-State League 

International League 

Maine League 

Northern League , 



Lewiston, Me 

Staunton, 111 

Lake Charles, La. 

Olean, N. Y 

Hamilton, Ont. . . . 
Portland, Me..... 
Brandon, Minn . . . 



8 


3 


23 


9 


18 


9 


15 


2 


22 


18 


32 


20 


50 


31 



.727 
.718 
.667 
.882 
.550 
.€15 
.617 



LEAGUES NOT UNDER NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 



Atlantic League I Allen town, Pa.. 

California State League I Stockton, Cal.. 



34 
62 



16 
17 



.680 
.785 



284 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

SPALDING'S 
SIMPLIFIED BASE BALL RULES 

Simplified Base Ball rules have been prepared by Mr. A. G. 
Spalding of New York and Chicago, who is the recognized 
authority on the National Game. They are of great assistance 
to beginners as well as to veterans. Based on the Official 
Playing Rules, as published in Spalding's Official Base Ball 
Guide, they state in condensed form all the technicalities that 
must be observed in the sport without the somewhat dry and 
formal wording which is necessarily employed by the rule 
makers to state each fact with great explicitness. 

The Simplified Rules are intended especially for the amateur 
player and spectator. It is frequently the case that both have 
neither the time nor the inclination to study at length the 
reason for motives through the intricacies of the Complete 
Code of Playing Rules. The latter are essential, of course, to 
the professional expert. 

In the Simplified Rules nothing will be found lacking which 
is accessory to the game. Wherever the technical reading of 
a rule is sought the simplified code provides for ready refer- 
ence, which is another point in its favor. 

A division is made of the important departments under 
appropriate headings, with a special notation referring to the 
particular official rule in the Spalding Guide bearing upon 
the point which is under discussion. By this method it will be 
observed that it is easy to turn from the Simplified Rules 
to the Official Rules whenever the exact law as laid down by 
the authorities of the major leagues is deemed requisite for 
consultation. 



The Ball Ground- 
How to Lay it Out 



Base Ball is played upon a level field, upon which is out- 
lined a square, which is known as the infield or "diamond." 
The term "diamond," in a broader sense, is also frequently 
used in the United States to apply to the entire playing field. 
Literally, however, the "diamond" is the infield proper. 

The infield is bounded by the base-running paths, which 
extend from base to base. The bases are placed at right 
angles to each other, on each corner of the "diamond," at 
intervals of ninety feet beginning from the home plate. Thus, 
first base must be ninety feet from home plate, second base 
ninety feet from first base, third base ninety feet from second 
base and also ninety feet from the home plate, thus completing 
a perfect square. 

The territory which lies behind third base, second base and 
first base, beyond the infield and within the lines defining fair 
ground and also without these lines, is known as the outfield. 
All that portion of the field outside of the base lines that 
extend from home plate to first base and from home plate to 
third base, all territory behind the home plate and all terri- 
tory outside of straight lines reaching from the outside corner 
of third and first bases indefinitely to the outfield is foul 
ground. 

Sometimes it is impossible for boys who desire to play Base 
Ball to obtain a field sufficiently large for the regulation 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 285 

diamond, whose dimensions have previously been stated, and 
in such cases an effort should always be made to place the 
bases at equal distances from each other in order that the 
symmetry of the diamond and the correct theory of the game 
may be preserved. Players of younger years may find that a 
smaller diamond adds more enjoyment to their amusement, 
since they are better able to cover the ground in fielding the 
ball in a smaller area and do not become so fatigued by running 
the bases when the latter are stationed at their full legal dis- 
tance from each other. 

The bases, except home plate, are best constructed of canvas 
bags filled with sawdust. Home plate should be of whitened 
rubber, whenever it is possible to obtain it. Some cruder sub- 
stance may be used for bases if nothing else is obtainable, but 
it is best to follow the suggestions given. First, second and 
third bases should be attached to pegs driven in the ground, 
and home plate should be sunk so that its upper surface is on 
a level with the surface of the ground. 

The pitcher's position on a diamond of regulation size is 
located sixty and five-tenths feet from home plate, and on a 
straight line, extending from home plate to the center of second 
base. It, too, should be denoted by a plate of whitened rubber, 
to be sunk until its upper surface is on a level with the surface 
of the field. This plate should be the shape of a parallelo- 
gram twenty-four inches long by six inches wide, with the 
longer sides of the parallelogram at right angles to home 
plate. 

If a diamond smaller than the regulation size be used, the 

pitcher's position should be relatively closer to home plate. 

(For detailed description of laying out a "diamond" see 

Rules Nos. 1 to 13, inclusive, of Spalding's Official 

Base Ball Guide.) 

The Ball 

The Spalding Official National League Ball is used in regula- 
tion games, but for players fifteen years of age or younger, the 
Spalding Official "National League Junior" ball, made the 
same as the National League Ball, only slightly smaller in 
size, should be used, for it better fits the boy's hand and pre- 
vents straining the arm in throwing. 

(See Rule No. 14 of Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide.) 

The Regulation Bat 

The Bat must always be round and not to exceed 2% inches 
in diameter at the thickest part. Spalding Trade Mark Bats 
are made to suit all ages and physiques, and are strictly in 
accordance with official regulations. 

(See Rule No. 15 of Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide.) 

Regulation Gloves and Mitts 

The catcher or first baseman may wear a glove or mitt of 
any size, shape or weight. Every other player is restricted to 
the use of a glove or mitt weighing not over ten ounces and 
measuring not over fourteen inches around the palm. Spalding's 
Trade Marked Gloves and Mitts are regulation weight and size 
and are used by all champion players. 

(See Rule No. 20 of Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide.) 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



Players 9 Uniforms 



Games played by players not clad in a regular uniform are 
called "scrub" games and are not recorded as "match" games. 
Every club should adopt a regular uniform, not only to enable 
the players to play properly and with comfort, but to distin- 
guish one team from the other. 

(See Rule No. 19 of Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide.) 



Play 



ers* Benches 



All ball grounds should be provided with two players' benches 
back of and on each side of the home plate. They must be not 
less than twenty-five feet outside of the coachers' lines. The 
coachers may not go within fifteen feet of the base lines. Each 
team should occupy one of these benches exclusively, and their 
bats and accoutrements should be kept near the bench. 

(See Rule No. 21 of Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide.) 

Field Rules 

No person shall be allowed upon any part of the playing 
field except the players in uniform, the manager of each side 
(and the latter not when the game is in progress, except that 
he is in uniform) ; the umpire and the officers of the law. No 
manager, captain, or player is supposed to address the specta- 
tors. In a regular League match this is considered a viola- 
tion of the rules. 

(See Rules Nos. 75-77 of Spalding's Official Base Ball 
Guide.) 

Soiling and Providing Balls 

No player shall be allowed to soil a new ball prior to put- 
ting it into play. 

In League games the home team provides the ball. It is 
customary in smaller leagues to expect the home team to do 
the same. The umpire has the custody of the ball when it is 
not in play, but at the conclusion of the game the ball becomes 
the property of the winning team. 

(See Rule No. 14 of Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide.) 

Number and Position of Players 

Two teams make up each contest with nine players on each 
side. The fielders are known as the pitcher, the catcher, the 
first baseman, the second baseman, the third baseman, the 
shortstop, the left fielder, the center fielder and the right 
fielder. None of these is required to occupy an exact position 
on the field, except the pitcher, who must stand with his foot 
touching the pitcher's plate when in the act of delivering the 
ball to the batter, and the catcher, who must be within the 
"catcher's space" behind the batter and within ten feet of 
home plate. Players in uniform must not occupy seats in the 
stands or mingle with the spectators. 

(See Rules Nos. 16, 17 and 18 of Spalding's Official Base 
Ball Guide.) 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 287 



Substitute Players 



It is always advisable to have a sufficient number of sub- 
stitutes in uniform ready to take the field in case any player 
shall become disabled or be disqualified. 

(See Rule No. 28 of Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide.) 

Choice of Innings — 
Fitness of Field for Play 

The home team has the choice of innings and determines 
whether the ground is fit for play providing it has rained 
before the beginning of the game. If two clubs from the same 
city are playing, the captain of the team on whose ground the 
game is played has the choice of innings. 

(See Rule No. 29 of Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide.) 



A Regulation Game 



The game begins with the fielders of the team losing the 
choice of innings in their respective positions. The first batter 
of the opposing team is in his "box" at home plate. This 
"box" is a parallelogram, six feet by four, on either side of 
home plate, and six inches back from the furthest corner of 
the plate. 

If it is not possible to outline a "box" it should be remem- 
bered that the batter is never allowed to step over home plate 
to strike at the ball, and that he must not run forward toward 
the pitcher, to exceed three feet from the center of the plate, 
to strike at the ball. 

The umpire may take his position, at his option, either 
behind the pitcher or the catcher. He judges all balls and 
strikes, declares all outs, decides whether the ball is batted 
foul or fair, decides as to the legality of the pitcher's deliv- 
ery, and, in fact, has complete control of the game. His 
decisions must never be questioned, except by the captain of 
either team, and only by the latter when there is a difference 
of opinion as to the correct interpretation of the rules. 

The team at bat is allowed two coaches on the field, one 
opposite first base and the other opposite third base, but they 
must never approach either base to a distance closer than 
fifteen feet, and must not coach when there are no runners on 
the bases. 

Whenever a player is substituted on a nine he must always 
bat in the order of the man who retires from the game. A 
player may be substituted at any time, but the player whose 
place he takes is no longer eligible to take part in the contest. 

When a substitute takes the pitcher's place in the box he must 
remain there until the batsman then at bat either is retired or 
reaches first base. 

A game is won when the side first at bat scores fewer runs 
in nine innings than the side second at bat. This rule applies 
to games of fewer innings. Thus, whenever the side second 
at bat has scored more runs in half an inning less of play 
than the side first at bat it is the winner of the game, pro- 
vided that the side first at bat has completed five full innings 
as batsmen. A game is also won if the side last at bat scores 
the winning run before the third hand is out. 

In case of a tie game play continues until at the end of 
even innings one side has scored more runs than the other, 
provided that if the side last at bat scores the winning run 



288 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

before the third hand is out the game shall terminate. This 
latter provision applies to a regular nine-inning game. Rul- 
ings relative to drawn games and games that are called because 
of atmospheric disturbances, fire or panic will be found under 
the head of "Umpire's Duties." 

(See Rules Nos. 22-27 of Spalding's Official Base Ball 
Guide.) 



Pitching Rules 



Before pitching the ball the pitcher must face the batsman 
with both feet squarely on the ground and in front of the 
pitcher's plate. When the ball is delivered the pitcher must 
face the batter and one of his feet must be in contact with 
the pitcher's plate. Not more than one step must be taken in 
the act of delivery. 

Whenever the ball after being pitched and without striking 
the ground goes over any part of home plate between the knee 
and the shoulder of the batsman it must be called a strike, 
whether the batsman strikes at it or not. 

If the pitcher fails to deliver the ball over any part of the 
plate, or if he delivers it over the plate above the shoulder or 
below the knee and the batsman declines to strike at it, it is 
called a ball. 

If the ball touches the ground before it passes home plate 
and is not struck at by the batsman, it is a ball and must be 
called as such by the umpire. If struck at, it is, of course, 
recorded as a strike. 

At the beginning of each inning the pitcher is allowed to 
throw five balls to the catcher or to an infielder for ''warming- 
up" practice, the batsman refraining from occupying his posi- 
tion in the "box" at home plate. 

After the batsman steps into his position the pitcher must 
not throw the ball around the infield, except to retire a base 
runner. If he violates this rule and, in the opinion of the 
umpire, is trying to delay the game, the umpire may call a 
ball for every throw thus made. If the pitcher occupies more 
than twenty seconds in delivering the ball to the batter the 
umpire may call a ball for each offense of this nature. 

The pitcher must not make any motion to deliver the ball 
to the batsman and fail to do so, nor must he feint to throw 
to first base when it is occupied by a runner and fail to 
complete the throw. Violation of this rule constitutes a balk 
which gives all runners who are on the bases at the time an 
opportunity to advance a base each without being put out. 

A balk is also declared when the pitcher throws to any 
base to catch a runner without stepping directly toward that 
base in the act of making the throw ; when either foot of the 
pitcher is behind the pitcher's plate when he delivers the ball ; 
when he fails to face the batsman in the act of delivering the 
ball ; when neither foot of the pitcher is in contact with the 
pitcher's plate in the act of delivering the ball ; when in the 
opinion of the umpire the pitcher is purposely delaying the 
game ; when he stands in his position and makes any motion 
with any part of his body corresponding to his customary mo- 
tion when pitching and fails immediately to deliver the ball ; 
when he delivers the ball to the catcher when the latter is 
outside of the catcher's box. 

When a pitched ball, at which the batsman has not struck, 
hits the batsman or the umpire before the catcher touches it, 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 289 

the umpire must call it a dead ball and no base runner can 
advance. The batsman, however, must be in his position at 
the time that the ball hits him and must make every effort 
to get out of the way of the ball if he fears that it will hit 
him. 

If a batsman makes a foul strike, if a foul hit is not 
caught, if the umpire declares a dead ball, or if a fair hit ball 
touches a base runner, the ball becomes dead and is not in 
play until after it has been returned to the pitcher, standing 
in his position, and the umpire has given the word to resume 
play. No base runners may advance when the ball is not in 
play. 

Whenever a person not engaged in the game touches a batted 
or thrown ball, a block follows. This must at once be an- 
nounced by the umpire, and runners shall be privileged to 
advance bases until the ball is thrown to the pitcher, standing 
in his position. After that they advance at their peril. The 
pitcher may then throw a runner out wherever he sees a 
possibility of doing so. Should a spectator retain possession 
of a blocked ball, or throw it or kick it out of the reach «of 
the fielder who is endeavoring to recover it, the umpire must 
call "Time," and hold all runners at such bases as they occu- 
pied when he called "Time" until after he has permitted play 
to resume, with the ball returned to the pitcher standing in 
his position. 

(See Rules Nos. 30-37 of Spalding's Official Base Ball 
Guide.) 



Batting Rules 



Before the game begins each captain must present the bat- 
ting order of his team to the umpire, who shall submit it to 
the captain of the other side. This batting order is followed 
throughout the game except when a player is substituted for 
another, the substitute batting in the order of the retired 
player. 

Each player of each nine must go to bat in his regular 
order unless a substitute has been authorized to take his 
place. 

After the first inning the first batter in each succeeding 
inning is the player following the man who completed his 
full time at bat in the inning before. For instance, if a 
batter has but one strike in the first inning and the third 
hand be put out while he is at bat, he becomes the first batter 
in the following inning, not having completed his full time at 
bat in the inning previous. in such case, any balls and 
strikes called in the previous inning do not count when he 
resumes his time at bat. 

Players of the side at bat must remain on their seats on the 
players' bench except when called upon to bat, to coach, or to 
act as substitute base runners. 

No player of the side at bat except the batsman is priv- 
ileged to stand in the space behind the catcher, or to cross it 
while the pitcher and catcher are handling the ball. 

Players sitting on the bench of the side at bat must get out 
of the way of fielders who approach them while trying to 
field a batted or thrown ball. 

Any legally batted ball that settles on fair ground (the 
infield) between home and first base, or between home and 
third base, or that bounds from fair ground to the outfield 



290 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

inside of first base, or third base, or that touches the person of 
a player or the umpire on fair ground, is a fair hit. 

A fair hit is also any legally batted ball that first falls 
on fair territory beyond first base or third base. 

Any legally batted ball that settles on foul ground is a foul 
hit, except that a ground hit, should it roll from foul to fair 
territory between first and home and third and home, and 
remain there, is a fair hit. 

A ground hit that first strikes fair territory and rolls out- 
side of the foul line between first and home, or third and 
home, is a foul hit. 

Any legally batted ball that falls' on foul territory beyond 
first base, or third base, or that touches the person of a player 
or an umpire on foul ground, is a foul hit. 

A foul tip is the continuation of a strike which has merely 
been touched by the bat, shoots directly into the hands of the 
catcher and is held by him. 

A bunt hit is legally tapping the ball slowly within the 
infield by the batsman. If a foul result, which is not legally 
caught, the batsman is charged with a strike, whether it be 
the first, second or third strike 

Any hit going outside the ground is fair or foul as the 
umpire judges its flight at the point at which it passes beyond 
the limitations of the enclosure in which the contest takes 
place. A legal home run over a wall or a fence can only be 
made when the wall or fence is 235 feet from the home plate. 
This rule is not invariably followed in amateur games. 

If the batsman strikes at a pitched ball and misses it, a 
strike is called. 

If the batsman fails to strike at a pitched ball which passes 
over the plate at the proper height, a strike is called. 

A foul tip caught by the catcher is a strike. 

A foul hit, whether a fly or a ground hit, bounding to any 
part of foul ground, is a strike unless the batter has two 
strikes. After two strikes the batter may foul the ball without 
penalty unless he bunts or is caught out on a foul fly. 

All bunts rolling foul are strikes. If the batsman strikes 
at the ball and misses it, but the ball hits him, it is a strike. 

If the batsman, with either of his feet out of the batsman's 
box, hits the ball in any way it is a foul strike and the bats- 
man is out. 

If a batsman bats out of turn and it is discovered after 
he has completed his time at bat, but before the ball has been 
delivered to the succeeding batsman, the player who should 
have batted is out, and no runs can be scored, or bases be 
run, on any play made by the wrong batter. This penalty is 
not enforced unless the error has been discovered before the 
ball is delivered by the pitcher to the succeeding batsman. 

If the error is discovered while the wrong batsman is at 
bat, the proper player may take his place, but he must be 
charged with whatever balls and strikes have already been 
recorded against the wrong batsman. Whenever this happens 
the batters continue to follow each other in their regular 
order. 

Should the batsman who is declared out for batting out of 
order be the third hand out. the proper batsman in the next 
inning is the player who would have come to bat had the side 
been retired by ordinary play in the preceding inning. 

The batsman is out if he fails to take his position within 
one minute after the umpire has called for him. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 291 

The batsman is out if a foul fly, other than a foul tip, i* 
caught by a fielder, providing the latter does not use his cap,, 
his protector, or any illegal contrivance to catch the ball, and 
providing the ball does not strike some object other than a 
fielder before being caught. It has been ruled that when the 
ball lodges in the catcher's protector by accident and he 
secures it before it falls to the ground, the catch is fair. This* 
is a very exceptional play. 

The batsman is out on a foul strike. 

The batsman is out whenever he attempts to hinder the 
catcher from fielding or throwing the ball, either by stepping 
outside of the lines of his position or by deliberate obstruc- 
tion. 

The batsman is out when three strikes are called and first 
base is occupied, whether the catcher holds the ball or not, 
except there be two hands out at the time. 

The batsman is out, if, while attempting a third strike, the- 
ball touches any part of his person, and base runners are not 
allowed to advance. 

Before two men are out, if the batsman pops up a fly to the 
infield with first and second, or first, second and third bases 
occupied, he is out if the umpire decides that it is an infield 
hit. The umpire shall immediately declare when the ball i» 
hit whether it is an infield hit or an outfield hit. It is cus- 
tomary for the umpire to call the batter out in case that he" 
decides it an infield hit, so that base runners may be pro- 
tected and not force each other out through the medium of a 
double play. 

The batsman is out on a bunt that rolls foul if the attempted' 
bunt be made on the third strike. 

The batsman is out if he steps from one batsman's box to> 
the other after the pitcher has taken his position. 

(See Rules Nos. 38-51 of Spalding's Official Base Ball 
Guide.) 

Base Running Rules 

After the batsman makes a fair hit in which he is not put 
out he must touch first, second and third bases, and then the 
home plate in regular succession in order to score a run. 

No base runner may score ahead of the men who precedes 
him in the batting order, if that player is also a base runner. 

The batsman must run to first base immediately after mak- 
ing a fair hit, or when four balls have been called by the 
umpire, or when three strikes have been declared by the umpire. 

If the batsman is hit by a pitched ball, either on his per- 
son or clothing, and the umpire is satisfied that the batsman 
did not purposely get in the way of the ball, and that he 
used due precaution to avoid it, he is entitled to run to first 
base without being put out. 

The batsman is entitled to run to first base without being 
put out if the catcher interferes with him or tries to prevent 
him from striking at the ball. 

The batsman is entitled to first base, without being put: 
out, if a fair hit ball hit either the person or clothing of an 
umpire or a base runner who is on fair ground. 

Whenever the umpire sends the batsman to first base after 
four balls have been called, or for being hit by a pitched ball,, 
or because he has been interfered with by the catcher, all 
runners on bases immediately ahead of him may advance a. 



292 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GriDB. 

hase each without being put out. A runner on second or third 
base with first base unoccupied would not be considered a 
runner immediately ahead. 

Any base runner is entitled to advance one base when the 
umpire calls a balk. 

Anv base runner is entitled to advance one base when the 
ball, 'after being delivered by the pitcher, passes the catcher 
and touches the umpire, or any fence or building within ninety 
feet of the home plate. The penalty in regard to touching a 
fence or building is frequently waived by mutual consent where 
the ground area is limited. 

If a fielder obstructs a base runner the latter may go to the 
next base without being put out, providing the fielder did not 
Jaave the ball in his hand with which to touch the runner. 

A base runner may advance a base whenever a fielder stops 
or catches the ball with his cap, glove, or any part of his 
uniform detached from its proper place on his person. 

The base runner shall return to his base without liability 
•of being put out when a foul is not legally caught, when a 
ground ball is batted foul, or when the batter makes a foul 
•strike. 

On a dead ball the runner shall return to his base without 
liability of being put out, unless it happens to be the fourth 
pitched ball to the batter, in which case, if first, or first and 
second base, or first, second and third bases be occupied, run- 
ners shall advance to the next bases in regular order. If by 
.accident the umpire interferes with the catcher's throw, or a 
thrown ball hits the umpire, the runner must return to his 
base and is not to be put out. If a pitched ball is struck at 
by the batsman, but missed, and the ball hits the batsman, 
the runner must return to his base and may not be put out. 
In any of the above cases the runner is not required to 
touch any intervening bases to reach the base to which he is 
legally entitled. 

If after the third strike has been called and missed by 
the catcher the then batsman attempts to hinder the catcher 
from fielding the ball, he is out. 

Any fly ball legally hit by the batsman and legally caught 
-on fair or foul ground is out. 

Three strikes are out if the catcher holds the ball. In case 
he drops it, but picks it up, and touches the batsman, or 
throws it to first base, and the first baseman touches the base, 
or the batsman, before the latter can get to first base, the 
batsman is out. 

Should the batsman make a fair hit and in the last half of 
the distance between home plate and first base run more than 
three feet outside of the base line, he is out, except that he 
may run outside of the line to avoid interference with a fielder 
trying to field the ball as batted. This rule is construed rather 
liberally owing to the great speed with which runners go to 
•first base. 

Whenever the runner is on the way from first to second base, 
.second to third base, or third base to home plate, or in reverse 
order trying to secure the base which he has just left, he 
must keep within three feet of a direct line between bases. 
If he runs out of line to avoid being touched by a fielder, he is 
out. However, if a fielder is on the line trying'to field a batted 
ball, the runner may run behind him to avoid interference, and 
shall not be called out for it. 

Interference with a fielder attempting to field a batted ball 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 293 

retires the runner, unless two fielders are after the same hit, 
and the runner collides with the one whom the umpire be- 
lieves to have had the lesser opportunity to field the ball. 

The runner is always out at any time that he may be 
touched by the ball in the hands of a fielder, unless the runner 
is on the base to which he is legally entitled. The ball, how- 
ever, must be held by the fielder after he has touched the 
runner. If the runner deliberately knocks the ball out of the 
fielder's hands, to avoid being put out when not on base, he 
shall be declared out. 

If a runner fails to get back to a base after a foul or fair 
hit fly ball is caught, other than a foul tip, before the ball is 
fielded to that base and legally held, or the runner be touched 
by a fielder with the ball in his hands before he can get back 
to the base last occupied, the runner is out, except that if the 
ball be thrown to the pitcher, and he delivers it to the batter, 
this penalty does not apply. If a base should be torn from its 
fastenings as the runner strikes it. he cannot be put out. 

If a runner is on first base, or runners are on first and 
second bases, or on first, second and third bases, and the ball 
shall be legally batted to fair ground, all base runners are 
forced to run, except in the case of an infield fly (previously 
referred to), or a long fly to the outfield. Runners may be 
put out at any succeeding base if the ball is fielded there and 
properly held, or the runners may be touched out between 
in the proper manner. After a foul fly is caught, or 
after a long fly to the outfield is caught, the base runners 
have the privilege of trying for the next base. 

A base runner hit by a legally batted ball in fair territory 
is out. In such case no base shall be run, unless necessitated 
by the batsman becoming a base runner. No run shall be 
scored nor shall any other base runner be put out except the 
one hit by the batted ball, until the umpire puts the ball in 
play. 

A runner who fails to touch each base in regular or reverse 
order, when a fair play is being made, is out if the ball be 
properly held by a fielder on the base that should have been 
touched, or the' runner be touched out between bases by the 
ball legally held by a fielder, provided that the ball has not 
been delivered to the batsman in the meantime by the pitcher. 

If a runner fails to return to the base that he occupied 
when "Time" was called after the umpire has announced 
'■Play" he is out. provided that the pitcher has not in the 
meantime delivered the ball to the batsman. 

The runner is out if he occupies third base with no one 
out or one out and the batsman interferes with a play that is 
being made at home plate. 

The runner is out if he passes a base runner who is caught 
between two bases. The moment that he passes the preceding 
base runner the umpire shall declare him out. 

When the batter runs to first base he may overrun that base 
if he turns to the right after passing it. If he turns to the 
left he renders himself liable to be touched out before he gets 
back to the base. 

If, before two hands are out. and third base is occupied. 
the coacher at third base shall attempt to fool a fielder who is 
making or trying to make a play on a batted ball not caught 
on the fly. or on a thrown ball, and thereby draws a throw 
to home plate, the runner on third base must be declared out. 

If one or more members of the team at bat gather around 
a base for which a runner is trying, thereby confusing the 



294 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

fielding side, the runner trying for the base shall be declared 
out. 

If a runner touches home plate before another runner pre- 
ceding him in the batting order, the former loses his right to 
third base. 

(See Rules Nos. 52-57 of Spalding's Official Base Ball 
Guide.) 

Coaching Rules 

The coachers must confine themselves to legitimate direc- 
tions of the base runners only, and there must never be more 
than two coachers on the field, one near first base and the other 
near third base. 

(See Rule No. 58 of Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide.) 

Scoring of Runs 

One run shall be scored every time that a player has made 
the legal circuit of the bases before three men are out, pro- 
vided that a runner who reaches home on or during a play 
in which the third man is forced out, or the third man is put 
out before reaching first base, the runner shall not be entitled 
to score. 

A player who makes a legal hit to fair territory is entitled 
to as many bases as he can advance without being put out. 
If a fielder is unable to get the ball home until the man has 
completed the circuit of the bases, the latter is entitled to a 
home run, provided the fielder has not made a misplay in 
handling the ball. The same rule applies to the making of a 
three-base hit, a two-base hit, or a hit for one base, which is 
also known as a single. 

(See Rule No. 59 of Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide.) 

Ground Rules 

Any special ground rules shall be understood by both team 
captains and the umpire, or umpires, in case there be two 
oflicials. The captain of the home club establishes the ground 
rules, but if the visiting captain objects, the matter must be left 
to the umpire, who has final jurisdiction. 

(See Rule No. 69 of Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide.) 



Umpire's Duties 



The umpire has the right to call a draw game, whenever a 
storm interferes, if the score is equal on the last inning played. 
Calling a "draw game" must not be confounded with calling 
"time." 

If the side second at bat is at bat when a storm breaks, 
and the game is subsequently terminated without further play, 
and this side has scored the same number of runs as the other 
side, the umpire can call the game a draw without regard to 
the score of the last equal inning. In other words, the game 
is a draw just as it rests. 

Under like conditions if the side second at bat has scored 
more runs than the side first at bat, it shall be declared the 
winner, all runs for both sides being counted. 

A game can be forfeited by the umpire if a team refuses to 
take the field within five minutes after he has called "Play" ; 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 295 

if one side refuses to play after the game has begun ; if, after 
the umpire has suspended play, one side refuses to play after 
he has again called "Play" ; if one side tries to delay the 
game ; if the rules are violated after warning by the umpire ; 
if there are not nine players on a team after one has been 
removed by the umpire. The umpire has the right to remove 
players for objecting to decisions or for behaving in an un- 
gentlemanly manner. 

Only by the consent of the captain of an opposing team may 
a base runner have a player of his own side run for him. 

Play may be suspended by the umpire because of rain, and 
if rain falls continuously for thirty minutes the umpire may 
terminate the game. , The umpire may call "Time" for any 
valid reason. 



Umpire's Authority 



Under no circumstances shall a captain or player dispute 
the accuracy of an umpire's judgment and decision on a play. 
If the captain thinks the umpire has erred in interpretation 
of the rules he may appeal to the umpire, but no other player 
is privileged to do so. 

(See Rules Nos. 61-62 of Spalding's Official Base Ball 
Guide.) 



General Definitions 



"Play" is the order of the umpire to begin the game or to 
resume it after "Time" has been called. 

"Time" is the order of the umpire to suspend play tem- 
porarily. 

"Game" is the announcement of the umpire that the contest 
is terminated. 

"Inning" is the time at bat of one team and is terminated 
when three of that team have been legally put out. 

"Time at Bat" is the duration of a batter's turn against 
the pitcher until he becomes a base runner in one of the ways 
prescribed in the previous rules. In scoring a batter is exempt 
from a time at bat if he is given a base on balls, if he -makes 
a sacrifice hit, if he is hit by a pitched ball, or if he is inter- 
fered with by the catcher. 

(See Rules Nos. 78-82 of Spalding's Official Base Ball 
Guide.) 



Scoring Rules 



Each side may have its own scorer and in oase of disagree- 
ment the umpire shall decide, or the captain of each team 
may agree upon one scorer for the match. 

(See Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide for the Scoring 
Rules, and see Spalding's Official Score Book for a 
Complete Guide on "How to Score Correctly and 
with Understanding.") 



296 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

READY REFERENCE INDEX 
To the Official Playing Rules as Pub- 
lished in Spalding's Official 
Base Ball Guide 



The Ball Ground- 
How to Lay it Out 

See Official Rules, Nos. I to 13, inclusive, in Spalding's 
Official Base Ball Guide. 

The Players' Benches 

See Rule 21 in Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide. 

Field Rules 

See Rules 75-77 in Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide. 

The Official Ball 

See Rule 14 in Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide. 

The Regulation Bat 

See Rule 15 in Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide. 

Regulation Gloves and Mitts 

See Rule 20 in Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide. 

Players' Uniform 

See Rules 18-19 in Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide. 

Number and Positions of Players 

See Rules 16-17 in Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASH BALL GUIDE. 297 

Substitute Players 

See Rule 28 in Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide. 

Choice of Innings 

and Fitness of Field for Play 

See Rule 29 in Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide. 

General Definitions 

See Rules 78-83 in Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide. 

A Regulation Game 

See Rules 2.2-27 in Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide. 

Pitching Rules 

See Rules 30-37 in Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide. 

Batting Rules 

See Rules 38-51 in Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide. 

Base Running Rules 

See Rules 52-59 in Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide. 

Umpire's Duties 

See Rules 60-74 in Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide. 

Scoring Rules 

See Rules 84-86 in Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide. 



CORRECT DIAGRAM OF A BALL FIELD 




Enlarged Section Showing 
Home Base. 



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SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 299 

Official Playing Rules Professional 
Base Ball Clubs 

As adopted at the meeting of the Joint Playing Rules Committee of the 

National League and the American League, held at National 

League Headquarters, New York City, March 2, 1904. 

Amended February 14, 1906; February 25, 1907; 

February 27, 1908, and February 17, 1909. 

Amendment? indicated by Italics 

These Rules have also been adopted by 
The National Association of Professional, Base Ball Leagues. 

The Ball Ground. 

The ball ground must be enclosed. To ob- 

RULE 1. viate the necessity for ground rules, the 

shortest distance from a fence or stand on 

fair territory to the home base should be 235 feet and from 

home base to the grand stand 90 feet. 

To Lay Off the Field. 

To lay off the lines defining the location 
RULE 2. of the several bases, the catcher's and the 
pitcher's position and to establish the boun- 
daries required in playing the game of base ball, proceed as 
follows : 

Diamond or Infield. 

From a point., A, within the grounds, project a straight 
line out into the field, and at a point, B, 154 feet from point 
A, lay off lines B C and B D at right angles to the line 
A B ; then, with B as a center and 63.63945 feet as a radius, 
describe arcs cutting the lines B A at F and B C at G, B D 
at H and B E at I. Draw lines F G, G E, £ H, and H F, 
which said lines shall be the containing lines of the Dia- 
mond or Infield. 

The Catcher's Lines. 

With F as a center and 10 feet radius, de- 

RULE 3. scribe an arc cutting line F A at L, and 

draw lines L M and L O at right angles 

to F A, and continue same out from F A not less than 

10 feet. 



300 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

The Foul Lines. 

From the intersection point, F, continue 
RULE 4. the straight lines F G and F H until they 
intersect the lines L M and L O, and then 
from the points G and H in the opposite direction until 
they reach the boundary lines of the ground, and said lines 
shall be clearly visible from any part of the diamond, and 
no wood or other hard substance shall be used in the con- 
struction of such lines. 

The Players' Lines. 

With F as center and 50 feet radius, 
RULE 5. describe arcs cutting lines F O and F M 
at P and Q ; then, with F as center again 
and 75 feet radius, describe arcs cutting F G and F H at 
R and S ; then, from the points P, Q, R and S draw lines 
at right angles to the lines F O, F M, F G and F H, and 
continue the same until they intersect at the points T 
and W. 

The Coachers' Lines. 

With R and S as centers and 15 feet 

RULE 6. radius, describe arcs cutting the lines R W 

and S T at X and Y and from the points 

X and Y draw lines parallel with the lines F H and F G, 

and continue same out to the boundary lines of the ground. 

The Three-Foot Line. 

With F as a center and 45 feet radius, 
RULE 7. describe an arc cutting the line F G at 1, and 
from 1 to the distance of three feet draw a 
line at right angles to F G, and marked point 2 ; then from 
point 2, draw a line parallel with the line F G to a point 
three feet beyond the point G, marked 3 ; then from the 
point 3 draw a line at right angles to line 2, 3, back to 
and intersecting with F G, and from thence back along the 
line G F to point 1. 

The Batsman's Lines. 

On either side of the line A F B de- 
RULE 8. scribe two parallelograms six feet long and 
four feet wide (marked 8 and 9), their 
longest side being parallel with the line A F B, their 
distance apart being six inches added to each end of the 
length of the diagonal of the square within the angle F, 
and the center of their length being on said diagonal. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 301 

The Pitcher's Plate. 

Section i. With point F as center and 
RULE 9. 60.5 feet as radius, describe an arc cutting 
the line F B at line 4, and draw a line 5, 6, 
passing through point 4 and extending 12 inches on either 
side of line F B ; then with line 5, 6, as a side, describe a 
parallelogram 24 inches by 6 inches, in which shall be lo- 
cated the pitcher's plate. 

Sec. 2. The pitcher's plate shall not be more than 15 
inches higher than the base lines or the home plate, which 
shall be level with the surface of the field, and the slope 
from the pitcher's plate to every base line and the home 
plate shall be gradual. 



The Bases. 

Section i. Within the angle F, describe 
RULE 10. a five-sided figure, two of the sides of which 
shall coincide with the lines F G and F H 
to the extent of 12 inches each, thence parallel with the 
line F B 8^2 inches to the points X and Y, a straight line 
between which, 17 inches, will form the front of the home 
base or plate. 

Sec. 2. Within the angles at G, I and H describe 
squares, whose sides are 15 inches in length, two of such 
sides of which squares shall lie along the lines F G and 
G I, G I and I H, I H and H F, which squares shall be 
the location of the first, second and third bases respectively. 



The Home Base at F and the Pitcher's 
RULE 11. Plate at 4 must each be of whitened rubber, 
and so fixed in the ground as to be even 
with its surface. 

The First Base at G, the Second Base 
RULE 12. at E, and the Third Base at H must each 
be a white canvas bag filled with soft ma- 
terial and securely fastened in place at the points specified 
in Rule 10. 

The lines described in Rules 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 
RULE 13. and 8 must be marked with lime, chalk or 
other white material, easily distinguishable 
from the ground or grass. 



302 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

The Ball. 

Section i. The ball must weigh not less 
RULE 14. than five nor more than five and one-quar- 
ter ounces avoirdupois, and measure not 
less than nine nor more than nine and one-quarter inches 
in circumference. The Spalding National League Ball or 
the Reach American League Ball must be used in all 
games played under these rules. 

Sec. 2. Two regulation balls of the make adopted by 
the league of which the contesting clubs are members, 
shall be delivered by the home club to the umpire at or 
before the hour for the commencement of a championship 
game. If the ball placed in play be batted or thrown out 
of the grounds or into one of the stands for spectators 
or in the judgment of the umpire, become unfit for play 
from any cause, the umpire shall at once deliver the alter- 
nate ball to the pitcher and another legal ball shall be sup- 
plied to him, so that he shall at all times have in his con- 
trol one or more alternate balls. Provided, however, that 
all balls batted or thrown out of the ground or into a stand 
shall when returned to the field be given into the custody 
of the umpire immediately and become alternate balls and 
so long as he has in his possession two or more alternate 
balls, he shall not call for a new ball to replace one that has 
gone out of play. The alternate balls shall become the ball 
in play in the order in which they were delivered to the 
umpire. 

Sec. 3. Immediately upon the delivery to him of the 
alternate ball by the umpire, the pitcher shall take his posi- 
tion and on the call of "Play," by the umpire, it shall be- 
come the ball in play. Provided, however, that play shall 
not be resumed with the alternate ball when a fair batted 
ball or a ball thrown by a fielder goes out of the ground 
or into a stand for spectators until the base-runners have 
completed the circuit of the bases unless compelled to stop 
at second or third base in compliance with a ground 
rule. 



The Spalding League Ball has been adopted by the National League 
for the past thirty-two years and is used in all the League contests. It 
has also been adopted by the majority of other professional leagues and 
by practically all the colleges. 

For junior clwbs (clubs composed of boys under 16 years of age) we 
recommend them to use the Spalding Boys' League Ball, and that games 
played by junior clubs with this ball will count as legal games the same 
as if played with the Official League Ball. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 303 

Discolored or Damaged Balls. 

Sec. 4. In the event of a ball being intentionally dis- 
colored by rubbing it with the soil or otherwise by any 
player, or otherwise damaged by any player, the umpire 
shall, upon appeal by the captain of the opposite side, 
forthwith demand the return of that ball and substitute for 
it another legal ball, as hereinbefore described, and impose 
a fine of $5.00 on the offending player. 

Home Club to Provide Balls. 

Sec. 5. In every game the balls played with shall be 
furnished by the home club, and the last in play shall 
become the property of the winning club. Each ball shall 
be enclosed in a paper box, which must be sealed with 
the seal of the Secretary of the League and bear his certifi- 
cate that he has examined, measured and weighed the ball 
contained therein and that it is of the required standard in 
all respects. The seal shall not be broken by the umpire 
except in the presence of the captains of the contesting 
teams after "Play" has been called. 

Reserve Balls on Field. 

Sec. 6. The home club shall have at least a dozen reg- 
ulation balls on the field during each championship game, 
ready for use on the call of the umpire. 

The Bat. 

The bat must be round, not over two and 
RULE 15. three-fourth inches in diameter at the thick- 
est part, nor more than 42 inches in length 
and entirely of hardwood, except that for a distance of 
18 inches from the end, twine may be wound around or 
a granulated substance applied to the handle. 

Number of Players in a Game. 

The players of each club, actively en- 
RULE 16. gaged in a game at one time, shall be nine 
in number, one of whom shall act as cap- 
tain; and in no case shall more or less than nine men be 
allowed to play on a side in a game. 

Positions of the Players. 

The players may be stationed at any points 
RULE 17. of the field their captain may elect, regard- 
less of their respective positions, except 
that the pitcher, while in the act of delivering the ball to 



S04 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

the bat, must take his position as denned in Rules 9 and 
30; and the catcher must be within the lines of his position 
as defined in Rule 3 and within 10 feet of home base, when- 
ever the pitcher delivers the ball to the bat. 

Must Not Mingle With Spectators. 

Players in uniform shall not be permit- 
RULE 18. ted to occupy seats in the stands, or to 
mingle with the spectators. 

Uniforms of Players. 

Every club shall adopt two uniforms for 
RULE 19. its players, one to be worn in games at 
home and the other in games abroad, and 
the suits of each of the uniforms of a team shall conform 
in color and style. No player who shall attach anything 
to the sole or heel of his shoe other than the ordinary base 
ball shoe plate, or who shall appear in a uniform not con- 
forming to the suits of the other members of his team, 
shall be permitted to take part in a game. 

Size and Weight of Gloves. 

The catcher or first baseman may wear a 
RULE 20. glove or mitt of any size, shape or weight. 
Every other player is restricted to the use 
of a glove or mitt weighing not over 10 ounces and meas- 
uring not over 14 inches around the palm. 

Players' Benches. 

Section i. Players' benches must be fur- 
RULE 21. nished by the home club and placed upon 
a portion of the ground not less than twen- 
ty-five (25) feet outside of the players' lines. One such 
bench shall be for the exclusive use of the visiting team J 
and the other for the exclusive use of the home team. 
Each bench must be covered with a roof and closed at the 
back and each end ; a space, however, not more than six 
(6) inches wide may be left under the roof for ventilation. 
All players and substitutes of the side at bat must be 
seated on their team's bench, except the batsman, base- 
runners and such as are legally assigned to coach base- 
runners. Under no circumstances shall the umpire permit 
any person except the players and substitutes in uniform 
and the manager of the team entitled to its exclusive use 
to be seated on a bench. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 305 

Penalty for Violation. 

Sec. 2. Whenever the umpire observes a violation 
of the preceding section, he shall immediately order 
such player or players as have disregarded it to be 
seated. If the order be not obeyed within one minute the 
offending player or players shall be fined $5.00 each by the 
umpire. If the order be not then obeyed within one minute, 
the offending player or players shall be debarred from 
further participation in the game, and shall be obliged to 
forthwith leave the playing field. 

A Regulation Game. 

Every championship game must be com- 

RULE 22. menced not later than two hours before 

sunset and shall continue until each team 

has had nine innings, provided, however, that the game 

shall terminate : 

Section i. If the side first at bat scores less runs in nine 
innings than the other side has scored in eight innings. 

Sec. 2. If the side last at bat in the ninth inning scores 
the winning run before the third man is out. 

Sec. 3. If the game be called by the umpire on account 
of darkness, rain, fire, panic, or for other cause which puts 
patrons or players in peril. 

Extra-Inning Games. 

If the score be a tie at the end of nine 
RULE 23. (9) innings for each team, play shall be 
continued until one side has scored more 
runs than the other in an equal number of innings, pro- 
vided, that if the side last at bat score the winning run 
before the third man is out in any inning after the ninth, 
the game shall terminate. 

Drawn Games. 

A drawn game shall be declared by the 
RULE 24. umpire if the score is equal on the last 
even inning played when he terminates 
play in accordance with Rule 22, Section 3, after five or 
more equal innings have been played by each team. But 
if the side that went second to bat is at the bat when the 
game is terminated, and has scored the same number of 
runs as the other side, the umpire shall declare the game 
drawn without regard to the score of the last equal inning. 



306 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE 

Called Games. 

If the umpire calls a game in accordance 
RULE 25. with Rule 22, Section 3, at any time after five 
innings have been completed, the score 
shall be that of the last equal innings played, except that 
if the side second at bat shall have scored in an unequal 
number of innings, or before the completion of the un- 
finished inning, at least one run more than the side first at 
bat, the score of the game shall be the total number of runs 
each team has made. 



Forfeited Games. 

A forfeited game shall be declared by the 
RULE 26. umpire in favor of the club not in fault, in 
the following cases : 

Section i. If the team of a club fail to appear upon the 
field, or being upon the field, refuse to begin a game for 
which it is scheduled or assigned, within five minutes after 
the umpire has called "Play" at the hour for the beginning 
of the game, unless such delay in appearing, or in com- 
mencing the game, be unavoidable. 

Sec. 2. If, after the game has begun, one side refuse to 
continue to play, unless the game has been suspended or 
terminated by the umpire. 

Sec. 3. If, after play has been suspended by the umpire, 
one side fails to resume playing in one minute after the 
umpire has called "Play." 

Sec. 4. If a team employ tactics palpably designed to 
delay the game. 

Sec. 5. If, after warning by the umpire, any one of the 
rules of the game be wilfully and persistently violated. 

Sec. 6. If the order for the removal of a player, as 
authorized by Rules 21, 58 and 64, be not obeyed within 
one minute. 

Sec. 7. If, because of the removal of players from the 
game by the umpire, or for any cause, there be less than 
nine players on either team. 

Sec. 8. If, when two games are scheduled to be played 
in one afternoon, the second game be not commenced 
within ten minutes of the time of the completion of the 
first game. The umpire of the first game shall be the 
timekeeper. 

Sec. 9. In case the umpire declare the game forfeited, 
he shall transmit a written report thereof to the president 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 307 

of the League within twenty-four hours thereafter. How- 
ever, a failure on the part of the umpire to so notify the 
president shall not affect the validity of his award of the 
game by forfeiture. 

No Game. 

"No game" shall be declared by the um- 
RULE 27. pire if he terminates play in accordance with 
Rule 22, Sec. 3, before five innings are com- 
pleted by each team. Provided, however, that if the club 
second at bat shall have made more runs at the end of 
its fourth inning than the club first at bat has made in five 
completed innings of a game so terminated, the umpire 
shall award the game to the club having made the greater 
number of runs, and it shall count as a legal game in the 
championship record. 

Substitutes. 

Section i. Each side shall be required 
RULE 28. to have present on the field during a cham- 
pionship game a sufficient number of sub- 
stitute players in uniform, conforming to the suits worn 
by their team-mates, to carry out the provisions of this 
code which requires that not less than nine players shall 
occupy the field in any inning of the game. 

Sec. 2. Any such substitute may at any stage of the 
game take the place of a player whose name is in his 
team's batting order, but the player whom he succeeds 
shall not thereafter participate in that game. 

Sec. 3. A base-runner shall not have another player 
whose name appears in the batting order of his team run 
for him except by the consent of the captain of the other 
team. 

Choice of Innings — Fitness of Field for Play. 

The choice of innings shall be given to 
RULE 29. the captain of the heme club, who shall be 
the sole judge of the fitness of the ground 
for beginning a game after a rain; but, after play has been 
called by the umpire, he alone shall be the judge as to the 
fitness of the ground for resuming play after the game has 
been suspended on account of rain, and when time is so 
called the ground-keeper and sufficient assistants shall be 
under the control of the umpire for the purpose of putting 
the ground in proper shape for play, under penalty of 
forfeiture of the game by the home team. 



308 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

THE PITCHING RULES. 

Delivery of the Ball to the Bat. 

Preliminary to pitching, the pitcher shall 
RULE 30. take his position facing the batsman with 
both feet squarely on the ground and in 
front of the pitcher's plate ; and in the act of delivering the 
ball to the bat he must keep one foot in contact with the 
pitcher's plate defined in Rule 9. He shall not raise either 
foot until in the act of delivering the ball to the bat, nor 
make more than one step in such delivery. 

A Fairly Delivered Ball. 

A fairly delivered ball is a ball pitched 
RULE 31. or thrown to the bat by the pitcher while 
standing in his position and facing the bats- 
man that passes over any portion of the home base, before 
touching the ground, not lower than the batsman's knee, 
nor higher than his shoulder. For every such fairly deliv- 
ered ball the umpire shall call one strike. 

An Unfairly Delivered Ball. 

An unfairly delivered ball is a ball de- 
RULE 32. livered to the bat by the pitcher while 
standing in his position and facing the bats- 
man that does not pass over any portion of the home base 
between the batsman's shoulder and knees, or that touches 
the ground before passing home base, unless struck at by the 
batsman. For every unfairly delivered ball the umpire 
shall call one ball. 

Delaying the Game. 
Section i. If, after the batsman be stand- 
RULE 33. ing in his proper position ready to strike at 
a pitched ball, the ball be thrown by the 
pitcher to any player other than the catcher when in 
the catcher's lines and within 10 feet of the home base (ex- 
cept in an attempt to retire a base runner), each ball so 
thrown shall be called a ball. 

Sec. 2. The umpire shall call a ball on the pitcher each 
time he delays the game by failing to deliver the ball to 
the batsman for a longer period than 20 seconds, excepting 
that at the commencement of each inning, or when a pitch- 
er relieves another, the pitcher may occupy one minute in 
delivering not to exceed five balls to the catcher or an 
infielder, during which time play shall be suspended. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 309 

Sec, 3. In event of the pitcher being taken from the game 
by either manager or captain , the player substituted for him 
shall continue to pitch until the batsman then at bat has 
either been put out or has reached first base. 

Balking. 

A balk shall be: 
RULE 34. Section i. Any motion made by the 

pitcher while in position to deliver the ball 
to the bat without delivering it, or to throw to first base 
when occupied by a base runner without completing the 
throw. 

Sec. 2. Throwing the ball by the pitcher to any base to 
catch the base runner without stepping directly toward 
such base in the act of making such throw. 

Sec. 3. Any delivery of the ball to the bat by the pitcher 
while either foot is back of the pitcher's plate. 

Sec. 4. Any delivery of the ball to the bat by the pitcher 
while he is not facing the batsman. 

Sec. 5. Any motion in delivering the ball to the bat by 
the pitcher while not in the position denned by Rule 30. 

Sec. 6. Holding of the ball by the pitcher so long as, in 
the opinion of the umpire, to unnecessarily delay the game. 

Sec 7. Making any motion to pitch while standing in his 
position without having the ball in his possession. 

Sec 8. Making any motion of the arm, shoulder, hip or 
body the pitcher habitually makes in his method of delivery, 
without immediately delivering the ball to the bat. 

Sec 9. Delivery of the ball to the bat when the catcher 
is standing outside the lines of the catcher's position as 
defined in Rule 3. 

If the pitcher shall fail to comply with the requirements 
of any section of this rule, the umpire shall call a "balk." 

Dead Ball. 

A dead ball is a ball delivered to the bat 
RULE 35. by the pitcher, not struck at by the bats- 
man, that touches any part of the bats- 
man's person or clothing while he is standing in his position,, 
or that before passing or getting beyond the control of the 
catcher touches any part of the clothing or person of the 
umpire while he is on foul ground. 

Ball Not in Play. 

In case of a foul strike, foul hit ball not 
RULE 36. legally caught, dead ball, interference with 
the fielder or batsman, or a fair hit ball touch- 
ing a base runner, the ball shall not be considered in play 



310 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

until it be held by the pitcher standing in his position, and 
the umpire shall have called " Play." 

Block Balls. 

Section i. A block is a batted or thrown 
RULE 37. ball that is touched, stopped or handled by 
a person not engaged in the game. 
Sec. 2. Whenever a block occurs the umpire shall de- 
clare it, and base runners may run the bases without liabil- 
ity to be put out until the ball has been returned to and 
held by the pitcher in his position. 

( Sec. 3. If the person not engaged in the game should 
retain possession of a blocked ball, or throw or kick it 
beyond the reach of the fielders, the umpire shall call 
"Time" and require each base runner to stop at the base 
last touched by him until the ball be returned to the pitcher 
in his position and the umpire shall have called "Play." 

THE BATTING RULES. 
The Batsman's Position. 

Each player of the side at bat shall be- 
RULE 38. come the batsman and must take his posi- 
tion within the batsman's lines (as defined 
tin Rule 8) in the order that his name appears in his team's 
batting list. 

The Order of 3atting. 
Section 1. The batting order of each team 
RULE 39. must be delivered before the game by its cap- 
tain to the umpire, who shall submit it to the 
inspection of the captain of the other side. The batting order 
delivered to the umpire must be followed throughout the 
game unless a player be substituted for another, in which 
case the substitute must take the place in the batting order 
of the retired player. 

Sec. 2. When the umpire announces the pitcher prior 
io commencement of game, the player announced must pitch 
icntil the first batsman has either been put out or has reached 
first base. 

The First Batsman in an Inning. 

After the first inning the first striker in 
♦RULE 40. each inning shall be the batsman whose 
name follows that of the last man who 
completed his "time at bat" in the preceding inning. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 311 

Players Belong on Bench. 

When a side goes to the bat its players 
RULE 41. must immediately seat themselves on the 
bench assigned to them as denned in Rule 
21, and remain there until their side is put out, except 
when called to the bat or to act as coachers or substitute 
base runners. 

Reserved for Umpire, Catcher and Batsman. 

No player of the side "at bat," except the* 
RULE 42. batsman, shall occupy any portion of the- 
space within the catcher's lines as denned 
in Rule 3. The triangular space back of the home base is 
reserved for the exclusive use of the umpire, catcher and? 
batsman, and the umpire must prohibit any player of the 
side "at bat'' from crossing the same at any time while the 
ball is in the hands of the pitcher or catcher, or passing: 
between them while standing in their positions. 

Fielder Has Right of Way. 

The players of the side at bat must 
RULE 43. speedily abandon their bench and hasten 
to another part of the field when by remain- 
ing upon or near it they or any of them would interfere 
with a fielder in an attempt to catch or handle a thrown 
cr a batted ball. 

A Fair Hit. 
A fair hit is a legally batted ball that 
RULE 44. settles on fair ground between home and 
first base or between home and third base 
or that is on fair ground when bounding to the outfield 
past first or third base or that first falls on fair territory 
beyond first or 1hird base or that, while on or over fair 
ground, touches the person of the umpire or a player. 

A Foul Hit. 

A foul hit is a legally batted ball that 
RULE 45. settles on foul territory between home and 
first base or home and third base, or that 
bounds past first or third base on foul territory or that 
falls on foul territory beyond first or third base or, while 
on or over foul ground, touches the person of the umpire 
or a player. 



312 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

A Foul Tip. 

A foul tip is a ball batted by the bats- 
RULE 46. man while standing within the lines of his 
position, that goes sharp and direct from 
the bat to the catcher's hands and is legally caught. 

A Bunt Hit. 

A bunt hit is a legally batted ball, not 

RULE 47. swung at, but met with the bat and tapped 

slowly within the infield by the batsman. 

If the attempt to bunt result in a foul not legally caught, a 

strike shall be called by the umpire. 

Palls Patted Outside the Ground. 

Section i. When a batted ball passes 
fflULE 48. outside the ground or into a stand the um- 
pire shall decide it fair or foul according to 
nvhere it disappears from the umpire's view. 

Sec. 2. A fair batted ball that goes over the fence or 
into a stand shall entitle the batsman to a home run unless 
it should pass out of the ground or into a stand at a less 
distance than two hundred and thirty-five (235) feet from 
the home base, in which case the batsman shall be entitled 
to two bases only. The point at which a fence or stand 
is less than 235 feet from the home base shall be plainly 
indicated by a white or black sign or mark for the um- 
pire's guidance. Strikes. 

A strike is : 
RULE 49. Section i. A pitched ball struck at by 

the batsman without its touching his bat ; or, 

Sec. 2. A fair ball legally delivered by the pitcher at 
which the batsman does not strike. 

Sec. 3. A foul hit ball not caught on the fly unless the 
batsman has two strikes. 

Sec. 4. An attempt to bunt which results in a foul not 
legally caught. 

Sec. 5. A pitched ball, at which the batsman strikes but 
misses and which touches any part of his person. 

Sec. 6. A foul tip, held by the catcher, while standing 
within the lines of his position. 

Foul Strike. 

A "Foul Strike" is a ball batted by the 
RULE 50. batsman when either or both of his feet is 
upon the ground outside the lines of the 
batsman's position. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 313 

When Batsman is Out. 

The batsman is out : 
RULE 51. Section i. If he fail to take his position 

at the bat in the order in which his name 
appears on the batting list unless the error be discovered 
and the proper batsman replace him before he become a base 
runner, in which case, the balls and strikes called must 
be counted in the time "at bat" of the proper batsman. 
But only the proper batsman shall be declared out, and 
no runs shall be scored or bases run because of any act 
of the improper batsman. Provided, this rule shall not be 
enforced unless the out be declared before the ball be de- 
livered to the succeeding batsman. Should the batsman 
declared out under this section be the third hand out and 
his side be thereby put out, the proper batsman in the next 
inning shall be the player who would have come to bat 
had the players been put out by ordinary play in the pre- 
ceding inning. 

Sec. 2. If he fail to take his position within one minute 
after the umpire has called for the batsman. 

Sec. 3. If he make a foul hit other than a foul tip, as de- 
fined in Rule 46, and the ball be momentarily held by a 
fielder before touching the ground; provided, it be not 
caught in a fielder's cap, protector, pocket or other part 
of his uniform, or strike some object other than a fielder be- 
fore being caught. 

Sec. 4. If he make a foul strike, as defined in Rule 50. 

Sec. 5. If he attempt to hinder the catcher from fielding 
or throwing the ball by stepping outside the lines of the 
batsman's position, or in any way obstructing or interfer- 
ing with that player. 

Sec. 6. If, while first base be occupied by a base runner, 
the third strike be called on him by the umpire, unless two 
men are already out. 

Sec. 7. If, while attempting a third strike, the ball touch 
any part of the batsman's person, in which case base run- 
ners occupying bases shall not advance as prescribed in 
Rule 55. Section 5. 

Sec. 8. If, before two hands are out, while first and 
second or first, second and third bases are occupied, he 
hit a fly ball, other than a line drive, that can be handled 
by an infielder. In such case the umpire shall, as soon as 
the ball be hit, declare it an infield or outfield hit. 

Sec. 9. If the third strike be called in accordance with 
Sections 4 or 5 of Rule 49. 



314 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

Sec. io. If he steps from one batsman's box to the other 
after the pitcher has taken his position. 

BASE RUNNING RULES. 

Legal Order of Bases. 

The Base Runner must touch each base 
RULE 52. in legal order, viz., First, Second, Third 
and Home Bases ; and when obliged to re- 
turn while the ball is in play, must retouch the base or 
bases in reverse order. He can only acquire the right to a 
base by touching it, before having been put out, and shall 
then be entitled to hold such base until he has legally 
touched the next base in order, or has been legally forced 
to vacate it for a succeeding base runner. However, no 
base runner shall score a run to count in the game ahead 
of the base runner preceding him in the batting order, if 
there be such preceding base runner who has not been put 
out in that inning. 

When the Batsman Becomes a Base-Runner. 

The batsman becomes a base runner :. 
RULE 53. Section i. Instantly after he makes a 

fair hit. 

Sec. 2. Instantly after "Four Balls" have been called by 
the umpire. 

Sec. 3. Instantly after "Three Strikes" have been de- 
clared by the umpire. 

Sec. 4. If, without making any attempt to strike at the 
ball, his person or clothing be hit by a pitched ball unless, 
in the opinion of the umpire, he plainly make no effort 
to get out of the way of the pitched ball. 

Sec 5. If the catcher interfere with him in or prevent 
him from striking at a pitched ball. 

Sec. 6. If a fair hit ball strike the person or clothing of 
the umpire or a base runner on fair ground. 

Entitled to Bases. 

The base runner shall be entitled, with- 
RULE 54. out liability to be put out, to advance a base 
in the following cases : 
Section i. If, while the batsman, he becomes a base 
runner by reason of "four balls" or for being hit by a 
pitched ball, or for being interfered with by the catcher in 
striking at a pitched ball. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 315 

Sec. 2. If the umpire awards to a succeeding batsman a 
base on four balls, or for being hit by a pitched ball, or 
being interfered with by the catcher in striking at a pitched 
ball and the base runner be thereby forced to vacate the 
base held by him. 

Sec. 3. If the umpire call a "Balk." 

Sec. 4. If a ball delivered by the pitcher pass the catcher 
and touch the umpire or any fence or building within 
ninety (90) feet of the home base. 

Sec. 5. If he be prevented from making a base by the 
obstruction of a fielder, unless the latter have the ball in 
his hand ready to touch the base runner. 

Sec. 6. If the fielder stop or catch a batted ball with 
his cap, glove or any part of his uniform, while detached 
from its proper place on his person. 



Returning to Bases. 

The base runner shall return to his base 
RULE 55. without liability to be put out: 

Section i. If the umpire declares any foul 
not legally caught. 

Sec. 2. If the umpire declares a foul strike. 

Sec. 3. If the umpire declares a dead ball, unless it be 
also the fourth unfair ball, and he be thereby forced to take 
the next base, as provided in Rule 54, Section 2. 

Sec. 4. If the person or clothing of the umpire inter- 
fere with the catcher in an attempt to throw or the umpire 
be struck by a ball thrown by the catcher or other fielder 
to intercept a base runner. 

Sec. 5. If a pitched ball at which the batsman strikes 
but misses, touch any part of the batsman's person. 

Sec. 6. In any and all of these cases the base runner is 
not required to touch the intervening bases in returning to 
the base he is legally entitled to. 

When Base Runners are Out. 

The base runner is out : 
RULE 56. Section i. If, after three strikes have 

been declared against him while the batsman, 
the third strike ball be not legally caught and he plainly 
attempts to hinder the catcher from fielding the ball. 

Sec. 2. If, having made a fair hit while batsman, such 
fair hit ball be momentarily held by a fielder before touch- 
ing the ground or any object other than a fielder; pro- 



316 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

vided, it be not caught in a fielder's hat, cap, protector, 
pocket or other part of his uniform. 

Sec. 3. If, when the umpire has declared "Three 
Strikes" on him while the batsman, the third strike ball 
be momentarily held by a fielder before touching the 
ground; provided, it be not caught in a fielder's cap, 
protector, pocket or other part of his uniform, or touch 
some object other than a fielder before being caught. 

Sec. 4. If, after three strikes or a fair hit, he be touched 
with the ball in the hand of a fielder before he shall have 
touched first base. 

Sec. 5. If, after three strikes or a fair hit, the ball be 
securely held by a fielder while touching first base with 
any part of his person before such base runner touch first 
base. 

Sec. 6. If, in running the last half of the distance from 
home base to first base, while the ball is being fielded to 
first base, he run outside the three foot lines, as defined 
in Rule 7, unless he do so to avoid a fielder attempting to 
field a batted ball. 

Sec. 7. If, in running from first to second base, from 
second to third base, or from third to home base, he run 
more than three feet from a direct line between a base 
and the next one in regular or reverse order to avoid be- 
ing touched by a ball in the hands of a fielder. But in case 
a fielder be occupying a base runner's proper path in 
attempting to field a batted ball, then the base runner shall 
run out of direct line to the next base and behind said 
fielder and shall not be declared out for so doing. 

Sec. 8. If he fail to avoid a fielder attempting to field 
a batted ball, in the manner described in Sections 6 and 7 
of this rule, or in any way obstruct a fielder in attempting 
to field a batted ball, or intentionally interfere with a 
thrown .ball ; provided, that if two or more fielders attempt 
to field a batted ball, and the base runner come in contact 
with one or more of them, the umpire shall determine 
which fielder is entitled to the benefit of this rule, and 
shall not decide the base runner out for coming in contact 
with a fielder other than the one the umpire determines 
to be entitled to field such batted ball. 

Sec. 9. If at any time while the ball is in play, he be 
touched by the ball in the hands of a fielder, unless some 
part of his person be touching the base he is entitled to 
occupy; provided, however, that the ball be held by the 
fielder after touching him, unless the base runner delib- 
erately knock it out of his hand. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 317 

Sec. 10. If, when a fair or foul hit ball (other than a 
foul tip as denned in Rule 46) be legally caught by a 
fielder, such ball be legally held by a fielder on the base 
occupied by the base runner when such ball was batted, 
or the base runner be touched with the ball in the hands 
of a fielder, before he retouch such base after such fair or 
foul hit ball was so caught ; provided, that the base runner 
shall not be out in such case, if, after the ball was legally 
caught as above, it be delivered to the bat by the pitcher 
before the fielder hold it on said base, or touch the base 
runner out with it; but if the base runner, in attempting 
to reach a base, detach it from its fastening before being 
touched or forced out, he shall be declared safe. 

Sec. 11. If, when the batsman becomes a base runner, 
the first base, or the first and second bases, or the first, 
second and third bases be occupied, any base runner so 
occupying a base shall cease to be entitled to hold it, and 
may be put out at the next base in the same manner as in 
running to first base, or by being touched with the ball in 
the hands of a fielder at any time before any base runner 
following him in the batting order be put out, unless the 
umpire should decide the hit of the batsman to be an in- 
field fly. ■ 

Sec. 12. If a fair hit ball strike him before touching 
a fielder, and, in such case, no base shall be run unless 
necessitated by the batsman becoming a base runner, but 
no r i m shall be scored or any other base runner put out 
until *he umpire puts the ball back into play. 

^^ 13. If, when advancing bases, or forced to return 
to a base, while the ball is in play, he fail to touch the 
intervening base or bases, if any, in the regular or reverse 
order, as the case may be, he may be put out by the ball 
being held by a fielder on any base he failed to touch, or 
by being touched by the ball in the hands of a fielder 
in the same manner as in running to first base ; provided, 
that the base runner shall not be out in such case if the 
ball be delivered to the bat by the pitcher before the 
fielder hold it on said base or touch the base runner with it. 

Sec. 14. If, when the umpire call "Play," after the sus- 
pension of a game, he fail to return to and touch the base 
he occupied when "Time" was called before touching the 
next base ; provided, the base runner shall not be out, in 
such case, if the ball be delivered to the bat by the 
pitcher, before the fielder hold it on said base or touch the 
base runner with it. 



318 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

Sec. 15. If with one or no one out and a base runner on 
third base, the batsman interferes with a play being made 
at home plate. 

Sec. 16. If he pass a base runner who is caught between 
two bases, he shall be declared out immediately upon pass- 
ing the preceding base runner. 

Overrunning First Base. 

Sec. 17. The base runner in running to first base may 
overrun said base after touching it in passing without in- 
curring liability to be out for being off said base, pro- 
vided he return at once and retouch the base, after which 
he may be put out as at any other base. If, after over- 
running first base, he turn in the direction of or attempt 
to run to second base, before returning to first base, he 
shall forfeit such exemption from liability to be put out. 

Sec. 18. If, before two hands are out and while third 
base is occupied, the coacher stationed near that base shall 
run in the direction of home base on or near the base line 
while a fielder is making or trying to make a play on a 
batted ball not caught on the fly, or on a thrown ball, and 
thereby draws a throw to home base, the base runner en- 
titled to third base shall be declared out by the umpire 
for the coacher's interference with and prevention of the 
legitimate play. 

Sec. 19. If one or more members of the team at bat 
stand or collect at or around a base for which a base 
runner is trying, thereby confusing the fielding side and 
adding to the difficulty of making such play, the base run- 
ner shall be declared out for the interference of his team 
mate or team mates. 

Sec. 20. If he touch home base before a base runner pre- 
ceding him in the batting order, if there be such preceding 
base runner, lose his right to third base. 

When Umpire Shall Declare an Out. 

The umpire shall declare the batsman or „ 
RULE 57. base runner out, without waiting for an ap- 
peal for such decision, in all cases where 
such player be put out in accordance with any of these 
rules, except Sections 13 and 17 of Rule 56. 

Coaching Rules. 

The coacher shall be restricted to coach- 

RULE 58. ing the base runner only, and shall not 

address remarks except to the base runner, 

and then only in words of assistance and direction in run- 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 319 

ning bases. He shall not, by words or signs, incite or try 
to incite the spectators to demonstrations, and shall not 
use language which will in any manner refer to or reflect 
upon a player of the opposite club, the umpire or the spec- 
tators. Not more than two coachers, who must be players 
in the uniform of the team at bat, shall be allowed to oc- 
cupy the space between the players' and the coachers' lines, 
one near first and the other near third base, to coach base 
runners. If there be more than the legal number of coach- 
ers or this rule be violated in any respect the captain of 
the opposite side may call the attention of the umpire to 
the offense, and thereupon the umpire must order the il- 
legal coacher or coachers to the bench, and if his order 
be not obeyed within one minute, the umpire shall assess a 
fine of $5.00 against each offending player, and upon a 
repetition of the offense, the offending player or players 
shall be debarred from further participation in the game, 
and shall leave the playing field forthwith. 

The Scoring of Runs. 

One run shall be scored every time a 
RULE 59. base runner, after having legally touched 
the first three bases, shall legally touch the 
home base before three men are put out; provided, how- 
ever, that if he reach home on or during a play in which 
the third man be forced out or be put out before reaching 
first base, a run shall not count. A force-out can be made 
only when a base runner legally loses the right to the base 
he occupies and is thereby obliged to advance. 

UMPIRE AND HIS DUTIES. 
Power to Enforce Decisions. 

The umpire is the representative of the 
RULE 60. League and as such is authorized and re- 
quired to enforce each section of this code. 
He shall have the power to order a player, captain or man- 
ager to do or omit to do any act which in his judgment is 
necessary to give force and effect to one or all of these 
rules, and to inflict penalties for violations of the rules as 
hereinafter prescribed. 

There shall be no appeal from any de- 
RULE 61. cision of the umpire on the ground that he 
was not correct in his conclusion as to 
whether a batted ball was fair or foul, a base runner safe 
or out, a pitched ball a strike or ball, or on any other 
play involving accuracy of judgment, and no decision ren- 



B20 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

dered by him shall be reversed, except that he be con- 
vinced that it is in violation of one of these rules. The 
captain shall alone have the right to protest against a 
decision and seek its reversal on a claim that it is in con- 
flict with a section of these rules. 

Must Not Question Decisions. 

Under no circumstances shall a captain 
RULE 62. or player dispute the accuracy of the um- 
pire's judgment and decision on a play. 

Clubs Can Not Change Umpire. 

The umpire can not be changed during a 
RULE 63. championship game by the consent of the 
contesting clubs unless the official in charge 
of the field be incapacitated from service by injury or ill- 
ness. 

Penalties for Violations of the Rules. 

In all cases of violation of these rules, by 
RULE 64. either player or manager, the penalty shall 
be prompt removal of the offender from the 
game and grounds, followed by a period of such suspension 
from actual service in the club as the President of the League 
may fix. In the event of removal of player or manager by 
the umpire, he shall go direct to the club house and remain 
there during progress of the game, or leave the grounds; 
and a failure to do so will warrant a forfeiture of the game 
by the umpire. [ This rule shall be mandatory in the major 
leagues, but in minor leagues and in amatetir contests a 
fining system 7nay be substituted.'] 

Umpire to Report Violations of the Rules. 

The umpire shall within twelve hours 
RULE 65. after fining or removing a player from the 
game, forward to the president a report of 
the penalty inflicted and the cause therefor. 

Immediately upon being informed by the 
RULE 66. umpire that a fine has been imposed upon 
any manager, captain or player, the presi- 
dent shall notify the person so fined and also the club of 
which he is a member; and, in the event of the failure of 
the person so fined to pay to the secretary of the League 
the amount of said fine within five days after notice, he 
shall be debarred from participating in any championship 
game or from sitting on a player's bench during the prog- 
ress of a championship game until such fine be paid. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 321 

When the offense of the player debarred 
RULE 67. from the game be of a flagrant nature, 
such as the use of obscene language or an 
assault upon a player or umpire, the umpire shall within 
four hours thereafter forward to the president of the 
League full particulars. 

Warning to Captains. 

The umpire shall notify both captains be- 
RULE 68. fore the game, and in the presence of each 
other, that all the playing rules will be 
strictly and impartially enforced, and warn them that fail- 
ure on their part to co-operate in such enforcement will 
result in offenders being fined, and, if necessary to pre- 
serve discipline, debarred from the game. 

On Ground Rules. 

Before the commencement of a game the 
RULE 69. umpire shall see that the rules governing 
all the materials of the game are strictly 
observed. He shall ask the captain of the home club 
whether there are any special ground rules, and if there 
be he shall acquaint himself with them, advise the cap- 
tain of the visiting team of their scope and see that each 
is duly enforced, provided that it does not conflict with 
any of these rules, and are acceptable to the captain of the 
visiting team. If the latter object to a proposed ground 
rule, the umpire shall have authority to adopt or reject it. 

Official Announcements. 

The umpire shall call "Play" at the hour 
RULE 70. appointed for the beginning of a game, an- 
nounce "Time" at its legal interruption 
and declare "Game" at its legal termination. 

Suspension of Play. 

The umpire shall suspend play for the 
RULE 71. following causes: 

i. If rain fall so heavily as to cause the 
spectators on the open field and open stands to seek shelter, 
in which case he shall note the time of suspension, and 
should rain fall continuously for thirty minutes thereafter 
he shall terminate the game. 

2. In case of an accident which incapacitates him or a 
player from service in the field, or in order to remove 
from the grounds any player or spectator who has violated.. 



322 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

the rules, or in case of fire, panic or other extraordinary 
circumstances. 

Call of Time. 

In suspending play from any legal cause 
RULE 72. the umpire shall call "Time" ; when he calls 
"Time," play shall be suspended until he 
•calls "Play" again, and during the interim no player shall 
foe put out, base be run or run be scored. "Time" shall 
not be called by the umpire until the ball be held by the 
pitcher while standing in his position. 

Decisions on Balls and Strikes. 

The umpire shall call and count as a 
RULE 73. "ball" any unfair ball delivered by the 
pitcher to the batsman. He shall also call 
and count as a "strike" any fairly delivered ball which 
passes over any portion of the home base, and within the 
batsman's legal range as defined in Rule 31, whether struck 
at or not by the batsman ; or a foul tip which is caught 
by the catcher standing within the lines of his position, 
within 10 feet of the home base; or which, after being 
struck at and not hit, strike the person of the batsman; 
or when the ball be bunted foul by the batsman ; or any 
foul hit ball not caught on the fly unless the batsman has 
two strikes, provided, however, that a pitched ball shall 
not be called or counted a "ball" or "strike" by the um- 
pire until it has passed the home plate. 

If but one umpire be assigned, his duties 

RULE 74. and jurisdiction shall extend to all points, 

and he shall be permitted to take his stand 

in any part of the field that in his opinion will best enable 

him to discharge his duties. 

Field Rules. 

No person shall be allowed upon any 
RULE 75. part of the field during the progress of a 
game except the players in uniform, the 
manager of each side, the umpire, such officers of the law 
as may be present in uniform, and such watchmen of the 
home club as may be necessary to preserve the peace. 

No manager, captain or player shall ad- 
RULE 76- dress the spectators during a game except 
in reply to a request for information about 
the progress or state of the game. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 322? 

Every club shall furnish sufficient police 
RULE 77. force to preserve order upon its own 
grounds, and in the event of a crowd enter- 
ing the field during the progress of a game, and interfer- 
ing with the play in any manner, the visiting club may- 
refuse to play until the field be cleared. If the field be not 
cleared within 15 minutes thereafter, the visiting club may 
claim and shall be entitled to the game by a score of nine 
runs to none (no matter what number of innings has 
been played). 

General Definitions. 

"Play" is the order of the umpire to be- 
RULE 78. gin the game or to resume it after its sus- 
pension. 

"Time" is the order of the umpire to sus- 
RULE 79. pend play. Such suspension must not ex- 
tend beyond the day. 

"Game" is the announcement of the um- 
RULE 80. pire that the game is terminated. 

"An inning'' is the term at bat of the 
RULE 81. nine players representing a club in a game 
and is completed when three of such play- 
ers have been legally put out. 

"A Time at Bat" is the term at bat of a 
RULE 82. batsman. It begins when he takes his po- 
sition, and continues until he is put out 
or becomes a base runner. But a time at bat shall not be 
charged against a batsman who is awarded first base by the 
umpire for being hit by a pitched ball, or on called balls, or 
when he makes a sacrifice hit, or for interference by the 
catcher. 

"Legal" or "Legally" signifies as required 
RULE 83. by these rules. 



THE SCORING RULES. 

To promote uniformity in scoring cham- 

RULE 84. pionship games the following instructions 

are given and suggestions and definitions 

made for the guidance of scorers, and they are required to 

make all scores in accordance therewith. 



324 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

The Batsman's Record. 

Section i. The first item in the tabu- 

RULE 85. lated score, after the player's name and 

position, shall be the number of times he 

has been at bat during the game, but the exceptions made 

in Rule 82 must not be included. 

Sec. 2. In the second column shall be set down the runs, 
if any, made by each player. 

Sec. 3. In the third column shall be placed the first base 
"hits, if any, made by each player. 

The Scoring of Base Hits. 

Sec. 4. A base hit shall be scored in the following cases : 

When the ball from the bat strikes the ground on or 
within the foul lines and out of the reach of the fielders. 

When a fair-hit ball is partially or wholly stopped by 
a fielder in motion, but such player can not recover himself 
in time to field the ball to first before the striker reaches 
that base or to force out another base runner. 

When the ball be hit with such force to an infielder or 
pitcher that he can not handle it in time to put out the 
'batsman or force out a base runner. In a case of doubt 
over this class of hits, a base hit should be scored and 
the fielder exempted from the charge of an error. 

When the ball is hit so slowly toward a fielder that he 
cannot handle it in time to put out the batsman or force 
out a base runner. 

In all cases where a base runner is retired by being hit 
by a batted ball, unless batted by himself, the batsman 
should be credited with a base hit. 

When a batted ball hits the person or clothing of the 
umpire, as defined in Rule 53, Section 6. 

In no case shall a base hit be scored when a base runner 
is forced out by the play. 

Sacrifice Hits. 

Sec. 5. Sacrifice hits shall be placed in the Summary. 

A sacrifice hit shall be credited to the batsman who 
when no one is out or when but one man is out, advances 
a runner a base by a bunt hit, which results in the batsman 
being put out before reaching first, or would so result if 
it were handled without error. 

A sacrifice hit shall also be credited to a batsman who, 
when no one is out or when but one man is out, hits a fly 
ball that is caught but results in a run being scored, or 
would in the judgment of the scorer so result if caught. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASH BALL GUIDE. 325 

Fielding Records. 

Sec. 6. The number of opponents, if any, put out by 
each player shall be set down in the fourth column. Where 
the batsman is given out by the umpire for a foul strike, 
or fails to bat in proper order, or is declared out on third 
bunt strike, the put-out shall be scored to the catcher. In 
cases of the base runner being declared "out" for interfer- 
ence, running out of line, or on an infield fly, the "out" 
should be credited to the player who would have made 
the play but for the action of the base runner or the an- 
nouncement of the umpire. 

Sec. 7. The number of times, if any, each player assists 
in putting out an opponent shall be set down in the fifth 
column. An assist should be given to each player who 
handles the ball in aiding in a run out or any other play 
of the kind, except the one who completes it. 

An assist should be given to a player who makes a play 
in time to put a runner out, even if the player who could 
complete the play fail, through no fault of the assisting 
player. 

And generally an assist should be given to each player 
who handles or assists in any manner in handling the 
ball from the time it leaves the bat until it reaches the 
player who makes the put-out, or in case of a thrown 
ball, to each player who throws or handles it cleanly, and 
in such a way that a put-out results, or would result if 
no error were made by a team-mate. 

Assists should be credited to every player who handles 
the ball in the play which results in a base runner being 
called "out" for interference or for running out of line. 

A double play shall mean any two continuous put-outs 
that take place between the time the ball leaves the pitcher s 
hands until it is returned to him again standing in the 
pitcher s box. 

Errors. 

Sec. 8. An error shall be given in the sixth column 
for each misplay which prolongs the time at bat of the 
batsman or allows a base runner to make one or more 
bases when perfect play would have insured his being put 
out. But a base on balls, a base awarded to a batsman by 
bei?ig struck by a pitched ball, an illegal pitch, a balk, a 
passed ball or wild pitch, unless such wild pitch or passed 
ball be on the third strike and allow the batter to reach first 
base, shall not be included i?i the sixth column. In case of 
a wild pitch or a passed ball allowing the batter to reach 



326 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

first base, the Mtcher or the catcher, as the case may be, shall 
be charged with an error, 

An error shall not be charged against the catcher for a 
wild throw in an attempt to prevent a stolen base, unless 
the base runner advance an extra base because of the error. 

An error shall not be scored against the catcher or an 
infielder who attempts to complete a double play, unless 
the throw be so wild that an additional base be gained. 

In case a base runner advance a base through the failure 
of a baseman to stop or try to stop a ball accurately thrown 
to his base, the latter shall be charged with an error and 
not the player who made such throw, provided there was 
occasion for it. If such throw be made to second base the 
scorer shall determine whether the second baseman or 
shortstop shall be charged with an error. 

In event of a fielder dropping a fly but recovering the ball 
in time to force a batter at another base, he shall be exempted 
from an error, the play being scored as a "force-out ." 

Stolen Bases. 

Sec. 9. A stolen base shall be credited to the base run- 
ner whenever he advances a base unaided by a base hit, a 
put-out, a fielding or a battery error, subject to the follow- 
ing exceptions : 

In event of a double steal being attempted from bases one 
and two to bases two and three, where either is thrown out, 
the other shall not be credited with a stolen base. 

In event of a base runner being touched out after sliding 
over a base, he shall not be regarded as having stolen the 
base in question. 

In event of a base runner making his start to steal a base 
prior to a battery error, he shall be credited with a stolen 
base. 

In event of a palpable muff of a ball thrown by the catcher, 
when the base runner is clearly blocked, the infielder mak- 
ing the muff shall be charged with an error and the base 
runner shall not be credited with a stolen base. 

The Summary. 

The Summary shall contain: 
RULE 86. Section i. The score made in each in- 

ning of the game and the total runs of each 
side in the game. 

Sec. 2. The number of stolen bases, if any, by each 
player. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 327 

Sec. 3. The number of sacrifice hits, if any, made by each 
player. 

Sec. 4. The number of sacrifice flies, if any, made by 
£ach player. 

Sec. 5. The number of two-base hits, if any, made by 
each player. 

Sec. 6. The number of three-base hits, if any, made by 
each player. 

Sec. 7. The number of home runs, if any, made by each 
player. 

Sec. 8. The number of double and triple plays, if any, 
made by each club and the players participating in same. 

Sec. 9. The number of innings each pitcher pitched in. 

Sec. 10. The number of base hits, if any, made off each 
pitcher and the number legal at bats scored against each 
pitcher. 

Sec. 11. The number of times, if any, the pitcher strikes 
out the opposing batsmen. 

Sec. 12. The number of times, if any, the pitcher gives 
bases on balls. 

Sec. 13. The number of wild pitches, if any, charged 
against the pitcher. 

Sec. 14. The number of times, if any, the pitcher hits a 
batsman with a pitched ball , the name or names of the bats- 
man or batsmen so hit to be given. 

Sec. 15. The number of passed balls by each catcher. 

Sec. 16. The time of the game. 

Sec, 17. The name of the umpire or umpires'. 



828 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

Index to Rules 



TO LAY OFF THE FIELD. Sec. Rule. 

The ground 1 

Diamond or infield 2 

Catcher's lines 3 

Foul lines 4 

Players' lines 5 

Coachers' lines 6 

Three-foot line 7 

Batsman's lines 8 

Pitcher's plate 9 

Slope of infield from pitcher's plate 2 9 

The bases 2 10 

Material of 12 

The home base — shape and size of 1 10 

Material of 11 

Marking the lines — material of 13 

The ball 14 

Weight and size 1 14 

Make to be used 1 14 

Number to be delivered to umpire 2 14 

To be replaced if rendered unfit for play 2 14 

Return of those batted or thrown out of ground 2 14 

Alternate — when to be placed in play 3 14 

Penalty for intentional discoloring 4 14 

Furnished by home club 5-6 14 

The bat — material and size of 15 

THE PLAYERS AND THEIR POSITIONS. 

Number of players in the game 16 

Players' positions 17 

The pitcher's position 9, 30 

Must not mingle with spectators 18 

Uniforms and shoes 19 

Size and weight of gloves 20 

Players' benches 1 21 

Umpires not to wait for notice from captains 2 21 

THE REGULATION GAME. 

Time of commencing championship games 22 

Number of innings 22 

Termination of game 1-2-3 22 

Termination of game before completion of fifth inning 27 

Extra-innings game 23 

Drawn game 24 

Called game 25 

Forfeited game 26 

Failure of a club to appear 1 26 

Refusal of a club to continue play 2 26 

Failure of a club to resume play 3 26 

Resorting to dilatory tactics 4 26 

Wilfully violating rules 5 26 

Disobeying order to remove player 6 26 

Less than nine players 7 26 

Second game to begin ten minutes after completion of 

first 8 26 

If field be not cleared in fifteen minutes 77 

When groundkeeper is under umpire's control 29 

Umpire to make written report of forfeiture 9 26 

No game 27 

Substitutes 1 28 

May take place of player at any time 2 28 

Base runner — consent of opposing captain necessary ... 3 28 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 






Choice of innings — fitness of field for play 

Pitching rules: 

Delivery of the t all to bat 

A fairly delivered ball 

An unfairly delivered ball 

Penalty for delay by throwing tc bases 1 

Penalty for delay in delivery to batsman 2 

Balking: 

Failure to deliver ball after making motion 1 

Failure to step toward base before throwing 2 

Delivery of ball while foot is back of plate 3 

Delivery of ball while not facing batsman 4 

liotion to deliver ball while not in position 5 

Delaying game by holding ball 6 

Met::. )ut having ball 7 

Any habitual motion without delivery of ball to bat.. S 
Delivery :: ball while catcher is outside of his lines.. 9 

Dead ball — hitting batsman in position or umpire on foul 

ground 

Ball not in play 

Block rails: 

Touched : : . - : ; person not in game 1 

Base runners to stoi under certain conditions 3 

THE BATTING RULES. 

Batsman's position 

Order of batting 

First batsman in each inning 

Player- elong on bench 

Not to invade space reserved for umpire, catcher or 

batsman 

To vacate bench to prevent interference with fielder... 

A fair hit 

A foul hit 

A foul tip 

A bunt hit 

Infield fly — definition of 8 

Balls batted outside gr: 

Fair hi: over fence or into stand 1 

Fair or foul where last seen by umpire 1 

Batsman entitled to h :me run 2 

Strikes: 

Ball struck at bv batsman 1 

Fair ball not struck a: 2 

Foul hit not caught on fly unless batsman has two 

strikes 3 

Attempt to bunt resulting in foul 4 

Missed strike root which touches batsman 5 

Foul tip held by catcher 6 

A foul strike 



Rule. 
29 

SO 
31 
32 

33 

33 

34 
34 
34 
34 
34 
34 
34 
34 
34 

35 

36 



3S 

39 
40 

41 

42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
51 

48 

48 

4S 

49 
49 

49 
49 

49 
49 
50 



THE BATSMAN IS OUT. 

If he fail to take position in proper turn 

If he fail to take position within one minute 

If he make foul hit other than foul tip and ball is caught. 

If he make fool strike 

If he interfere with catcher 

If, with first base three strikes are called 

If. while attempting third striae, ball touch his person.... 

If. befc re : he hits infield fly 

If third strike is called in accordance with Sec. 4 o: 5 of 

Rule 49 

If he step from cne box to other 



10 



51 
51 
51 
51 
51 
51 
51 
51 

51 
51 



330 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

THE BASE-RUNNING RULES. Sec. Rule. 

Legal order of bases 53 

Not to score before runner preceding 53 

Batsman becomes base runner: 

After he makes fair hit 1 53 

After four balls are called 2 53 

After threv. strikes are called 3 53 

If he ue hit by pitched ball 4 53 

If catcher interfere with him 5 53 

If fair hit strike umpire or bass runner 6 53 

Entitled to bases (without liability to be put out) : 

If umpire call four balls 1 54 

If umpire award batsman first base for being hit by 

pitched ball 1 54 

If umpire award batsman first base for interference of 

catcher 1 54 

If umpire award next batsman first base 2 54 

If umpire call a "balk" 3 54 

If pitched ball pass catcher and hit umpire 4 54 

If prevented from advancing by fielder's obstruction.. 5 54 

If fielder stop or catch ball illegally 6 54 

Returning to bases (without liability to be put out) : 

If umpire declare any foul not legally caught 1 55 

If umpire declare foul strike 2 55 

If umpire declare dead ball 3 55 

If umpire interfere with catcher or throw 4 55 

If pitched ball struck at touches batsman 5 55 

When not required to touch intervening bases 6 55 

Base runners are out: 

Attempt to hinder catcher after three strikes 1 58 

Fielder hold fair hit 2 56 

Third strike held by fielder 3 56 

Touched with ball after three strikes 4 56 

Fielder touches first base ahead of runner 5 56 

Running out of three-foot lines 6 56 

Running out of line after having reached first 7 56 

Failure to avoid fielder in act of fielding ball 8 56 

Touched by fielder having ball in possession 9 56 

Ball held on base before runner can return 10 58 

Forced to vacate base by succeeding runner 11 56 

Hit by fair ball before touching fielder 12 56 

Failure to touch bases in regular or reverse order 13 56 

Failure to return to base held when "time" was called 14 56 

If batsman interfere with play at home plate 15 56 

Passing preceding base runner 16 56 

Overrunning first base 17 56 

Coacher drawing throw to plate 18 56 

Members of team at bat confusing fielding side 19 56 

Runner touching home before preceding runner 20 56 

Umpire to declare out without appeal for decision 57 

Coaching rules 58 

Scoring of runs 59 

Definition of a "force-out" 59 

THE UMPIRE AND HIS DUTIES. 

Power to enforce decisions 60 

No appeal from decision 61 

Captain alone has right to appeal on rule construction 61 

Cannot question umpire's accuracy of judgment 62 

Cannot change umpire during progress of game 63 

Penalties for violations 64 

Umpire to report fining or removal of player within 12 

hours 65 

Notification of fines and time of payment 66 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 331 

Se< , Rule. 

Umpire's report on flagrant cases 67 

Warning to captains 68 

Ground rules and materials of the game 69 

Official announcements 70 

Suspension of play 71 

Call of "time" 7i2 

Decisions on balls and strikes 73 

Position of umpire on field 74 

FIELD RULES. 

Persons allowed on field other than players and umpire 75 

Spectators shall not be addressed 76 

Police protection 77 

GENERAL DEFINITIONS. 

"Play" 78 

"Time" 79 

'Game" 80 

"An inning" • .. 81 

"A time at bat" .. 82 

"Legal" or "legally" • •• 83 

THE SCORING RULES (Rule 84). 

The batsman's record: 

Times at bat 1 85 

Number of runs 2 85 

First base hits 3 85 

When base hits should be credited 4 85 

Sacrifice tits 5 85 

The fielding record: 

Number of put outs, and explanation of , 6 85 

Number of assists, and explanation of 7 85 

Errors, and explanation of 8 85 

Exemption from errors 8 85 

Scorer to determine 8 85 

Stolen bases - 9 85 

The summary: 

The score of each inning and total runs 1 86 

The number of stolen bases 2 86 

The number of sacrifice hits 3 86 

The number of sacrifice flies 4 86 

The number of two-base hits 5 86 

The number of three-base hits 6 86 

The number of home runs .-. . 7 86 

The number of double and triple plays 8 86 

The number of innings each pitcher pitched in 9 86 

The number of base hits made off each pitcher 10 86 

The number of strike outs 11 86 

The number of bases on balls 12 86 

The number of wild pitches 13 86 

The number of hit batsmen 14 86 

The number of passed balls 15 86 

The time of the game 16 86 

The name of the umpire or umpires 17 86 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



Official National League Averages 



STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 



Clubs. 



Chi. N.Y. Pitts. Phil. Cin. Bos. Br. St.L. W. PC. 



Chicago 

New York 11 

Pittsburg 

Philadelphia 

Cincinnati 6 

Boston 

Brooklyn 

St. Louis 





11 


10 


9 


16 


16 


18 


19 


99 


.643 


11 




11 


16 


14 


16 


16 


14 


98 


.636 


12 


ii 




13 


14 


15 


13 


20 


98 


.636 


13 


6 


9 




12 


12 


17 


14 


83 


.539 


6 


8 


8 


10 




14 


16 


11 


73 


.474 


6 


6 


7 


10 


8 




12 


14 


63 


.408 


4 


6 


9 


5 


6 


10 




13 


53 


.344 


3 


8 


2 


8 


11 


8 


9 




49 


.318 



Lost 



56 



56 



71 



SI 



91 101 105 



Postponed Games— At Boston, 5; all played. At Brooklyn, 5; all played. 
At New York, 7; all played. At Philadelphia. 10; all played. At Pitts- 
burg, 13; all played. At Cincinnati, 6; all played. At Chicago, 11; all 
played. At St. Louis, 10; all played. 

Tie Games— At Boston, 1; played off. At New York, 3; played off. 
At Philadelphia, 1; played off. At Chicago, 1; played off. 



CHAMPIONSHIP WINNERS 

1871— Athletics 759 

1872— Boston 830 

1873— Boston 729 

1874— Boston 717 

1875— Boston 899 

1876— Chicago ... .788 

1877— Boston 646 

1878— Boston 683 

1879— Providence 702 

1880— Chicago 798 

1881— Chicago 667 

1882— Chicago 655 

1883— Boston 643 

1884— Providence 750 

1885— Chicago 770 

18S6— Chicago 726 

1887— Detroit 637 

1S88— New York 641 

18S9— New York 659 



IN PREVIOUS YEARS. 

1890 — Brooklyn 667 

1891— Boston 630 

1892— Boston 680 

1893— Boston 667 

1S94— Baltimore 695 

1895 — Baltimore 669 

1896— Baltimore 698 

1897— Boston 795 

1898— Boston 685 

1899— Brooklyn 682 

1900— Brooklyn 603 

1901— Pittsburg 647 

" ; 902— Pittsburg 741 

.903— Pittsburg 650 

. >)04— New York 693 

1905— New York 668 

1906 — Chicago 765 

1907— Chicago 704 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING 

Name and Club. G. AB. R. H. 

Wagner, Pittsburg 151 568 100 201 

Donlin, New York 155 592 71 198 

Doyle, New York 102 377 65 116 

Bransfield, Philadelphia 143 527 53 160 

Evers, Chicago 123 416 83 125 

Herzog, New York 59 160 38 48 

Lobert, Cincinnati 155 570 71 167 

Zimmerman, Chicago 30 113 17 33 

Titus, Philadelphia 149 539 75 154 

Bridwell, New York 147 467 53 133 

McCormick, Phila.-New York... 70 274 31 78 

Magee, Philadelphia 142 508 79 144 

Bresnahan, New York 139 449 70 127 

Murray, St. Louis 154 593 64 167 

Howard, Chicago 89 315 42 88 

Stem, Boston 19 72 9 20 

Kling, Chicago 125 424 51 117 

Graham. Boston 67 215 22 59 



TB. 


2B.3B.HR.SH.SB. 


PC. 


308 


39 


19 


10 


14 


53 


.354 


268 


26 


13 


6 


33 


30 


.334 


150 


16 


9 





25 


17 


.308 


208 


25 


7 


3 


16 


30 


.304 


156 


19 


6 





22 


36 


.300 


58 


6 


2 





10 


16 


.300 


232 


17 


IS 


4 


32 


47 


.293 


39 


4 


1 





.4 


2 


.292 


194 


24 


5 


9 


31 


27 


.286 


149 


14 


1 





20 


20 


.285 


100 


^o 


3 





7 


6 


.285 


212 


30 


16 


2 


19 


40 


.283 


161 


25 


3 


1 


24 


14 


.283 


237 


19 


15 


7 


4 


4S 


.282 


104 


7 


3 


1 


11 


11 


.279 


22 





1 





2 


1 


.278 


162 


23 


5 


4 


13 


16 


.276 


64 


5 








6 


4 


.274 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 333 

INDIVIDUAL BATTING.— (Continued. ) 

Name and Club. G. AB. R. H. TB. 2B.3B.HR.SH.SB. PC. 

Ritchey, Boston 120 421 44 115 137 10 3 2 21 7 .273 

Chance, Chicago 126 452 65 123 164 27 4 2 16 27 .272 

Bescher. Cincinnati 32 114 16 31 46 5 5 2 10 .272 

Merkle, New York 18 41 6 11 18 2 1 1 2 .268 

Seymour, New York 155 587 59 157 199 23 2 5 33 18 .267 

Osborn, Philadelphia 152 555 62 148 197 19 12 2 15 16 .267 

Beaumont, Boston 121 476 66 127 165 20 6 2 13 13 .267 

Tinker, Chicago 157 548 67 146 214 22 14 6 29 30 .266 

Maddox, Pittsburg 36 94 9 25 34 3 3 4 .266. 

Clarke, Pittsburg 151 551 83 146 200 18 15 2 22 24 .265 

Shaw, St. Louis 96 367 40 97 121 13 4 1 8 9 .264 

P. Moran, Chicago 45 150 12 39 46 5 1 8 6 .260 

Leach, Pittsburg 152 583 93 151 222 24 16 5 27 24 .259 

Kelley, Boston 62 228 25 59 77 8 2 2 6 5 .259 

Bates, Boston 117 445 48 115 144 14 6 1 13 25 .258 

Murdock, St. Louis 16 62 5 16 19 3 1 4 .258 

Tenney, New York 156 583 101 149 177 20 1 2 22 17 .256 

Delehanty, St. Louis 138 499 37 127 166 14 11 1 15 11 .255 

Hoblitzell, Cincinnati 32 114 8 29 36 3 2 3 2 .254 

Devlin, New York 157 534 59 135 167 18 4 2 19 19 .253 

Storke, Pittsburg 56 202 20 51 65 5 3 1 8 4 .252 

Thomas, Phila. and Pittsburg.. 107 410 54 103 137 11 10 1 8 11 .251 

Abbaticchio, Pittsburg 144 500 43 125 158 16 7 1 25 22 .250 

Ganzel. Cincinnati 108 388 32 97 136 16 10 1 18 6 .250 

Konetchy, St. Louis 154 545 46 135 193 19 12 5 25 16 .248 

Dooin, Philadelphia 132 435 28 108 133 17 4 12 20 .248 

Jordan, Brooklyn 146 515 58 127 191 18 5 12 11 9 .247 

Smith, Boston 38 130 13 32 41 2 2 1 4 2 .246 

Moren, Philadelphia 28 49 5 12 14 1 2 .245 

Grant, Philadelphia 147 598 69 146 175 13 8 14 27 .244 

Sweeney, Boston 127 418 44 102 123 15 3 18 17 .244 

Weimer, Cincinnati 15 45 7 11 12 1 2 1 .244 

Burch, Brooklyn 116 456 45 111 133 8 4 2 11 15 .243 

Hofman, Chicago 116 411 55 100 131 15 5 2 28 15 .243 

Paskert. Cincinnati 116 395 40 96 121 14 4 1 16 25 .243 

Becker, Pittsburg and Boston.. 60 236 17 57 64 3 2 2 9 .242 

Hummel, Brooklyn 154 594 51 143 190 11 12 4 12 20 .241 

Steinfeldt, Chicago 150 539 63 130 165 20 6 1 32 12 .241 

James Kane, Pittsburg 40 145 16 35 44 3 3 9 5 .241 

Karger, St. Louis 22 54 4 13 16 1 1 1 .241 

McGann, Boston 130 475 52 114 138 8 5 2 20 9 .240 

Dahlen, Boston 144 524 50 125 161 23 2 3 21 10 .239 

Huggins, Cincinnati 135 498 65 119 143 14 5 28 30 .239 

McMillan, Brooklyn 43 147 9 35 38 3 5 5 .238 

Schulte, Chicago 102 386 42 91 118 20 2 1 25 15 .236 

Wiltse, New York 44 110 9 26 28 2 7 1 .236 

Doolan, Philadelphia 129 445 29 104 143 25 4 2 19 5 .234 

Phelps, Pittsburg 20 64 3 15 21 2 2 1 .234 

Reulbach, Chicago 46 99 10 23 33 6 2 9 1 .232 

Hostetter, St. Louis 45 155 10 36 45 7 1 10 1 .232 

Sheckard, Chicago 115 403 54 93 123 18 3 2 21 18 .231 

Taylor, New York 27 35 8 8 5 .229 

Gibson, Pittsburg 140 486 37 111 144 19 4 2 10 4 .228 

Browne, Boston 138 536 61 122 147 10 6 1 18 17 .228 

Hulswitt, Cincinnati 119 386 27 88 110 5 7 1 12 7 .228 

Bowerman, Boston 74 254 16 58 71 8 1 1 4 4 .228 

Wilson, Pittsburg 144 529 47 120 151 8 7 3 19 12 .227 

Leifield, Pittsburg 34 75 6 17 20 1 1 3 2 .227 

Bayless, Cincinnati 19 71 7 16 20 1 1 1 .225 

Gill, Pittsburg 25 76 10 17 19 1 9 3 .224 

Mitchell, Cincinnati 119 406 41 90 114 9 6 1 14 18 .228 

Slagle, Chicago .• 101 352 38 78 84 4 1 22 17 .222 

Crandall, New York 32 72 8 16 26 4 2 6 .222 



334 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

INDIVIDUAL BATTING.— (Continued. ) 

Name and Club. G. AB. R. H. TB.2B.3B.HR.SH.SB. PC. 

Jacklitsch. Philadelphia 30 86 6 19 22 3 4 3 .221 

Schlei. Cincinnati 88 300 31 66 S3 6 4 1 13 2 .220 

Mowrey. Cincinnati 63 227 17 50 61 9 1 11 5 .220 

Lewis, Brooklyn 116 415 22 91 111 5 6 1 16 9 .219 

Knabe. Philadelphia 151 555 63 121 163 26 8 42 27 .218 

McLean. Cincinnati SS 309 24 67 S7 9 4 1 8 2 .217 

Luniley. Brooklyn 116 440 36 95 144 13 12 4 16 4 .216 

Pattee. Brooklyn 74 264 19 57 66 5 2 11 24 .216 

Swacina, Pittsburg 50 176 7 38 46 6 1 5 4 .216 

Shannon. N. Y. -Pittsburg 106 395 44 S5 96 2 3 1 13 IS .215 

Sheehan, Brooklyn 145 463 45 100 122 IS 2 26 9 .214 

Gilbert. St. Louis S9 276 12 59 66 7 8 6 .214 

John Kane. Cincinnati 127 455 61 97 131 11 7 3 26 30 .213 

Bliss. St. Louis 43 136 9 29 36 4 1 5 3 .213 

Barry, St. L.-N. Y 102 335 29 71 84 9 2 12 10 .212 

Richie. Philadelphia 25 52 11 15 2 1 .212 

Needham. New York 47 91 8 19 22 3 6 .209 

Brown. Chicago 44 121 5 25 25 5 2 .207 

Egan. Cincinnati 18 68 8 14 19 3 1 6 7 .206 

Marshall. St. Louis-Chicago.... 15 34 4 7 9 1 1 .206 

Charles, St. Louis 119 454 39 93 116 14 3 1 20 15 .205 

Hannifin, New York-Boston 80 259 30 53 69 6 2 2 11 7 .205 

Mclntire. Brooklyn 40 100 5 20 25 3 1 1 .200 

Alpermac Brooklyn 57 213 17 42 50 3 1 1 9 2 .197 

Osteen, St. Louis 29 112 2 22 26 4 2 .196 

Maloney. Brooklyn 107 359 31 70 93 5 7 3 14 14 .195 

O'Rourke, St. Louis 53 164 8 32 40 4 2 8 2 .115 

Spade, Cincinnati 35 S7 9 17 19 1 3 .195 

Ames, New York IS 36 5 7 7 4 .194 

Moeller, Pittsburg 27 109 14 21 26 3 1 4 .193 

Ritter, Brooklyn 37 99 6 19 23 2 1 2 .192 

Byrne. St. Louis 126 439 27 84 93 7 1 24 16 .191 

Catterson, Brooklyn 18 63 5 13 19 1 1 1 2 .191 

Raymond, St. Louis 48 90 3 17 19 2 3 .139 

Starr. Pittsburg 19 59 8 11 13 2 3 6 .136 

Ludwig, St. Louis 62 187 15 34 40 2 2 4 3 .182 

Courtney. Philadelphia 42 160 14 29 32 3 5 1 .181 

McGinnity. New York 37 61 3 11 12 1 5 1 .180 

Rucker, Brooklyn 42 117 3 21 23 1 1 1 .179 

Dorner. Boston 33 67 4 12 12 5 .179 

Morris. St. Louis 23 73 1 13 16 1 1 4 1 .173 

I. Young, Boston-Pittsburg 32 62 4 11 13 1 1 .177 

Lindaman, Boston 43 S5 10 15 16 1 4 .176 

Bergen, Brooklyn 99 302 8 53 65 S 2 13 1 .175 

C. Moran, St. Louis 16 63 2 11 16 1 2 .175 

Reilly. St. Louis 29 SI 5 14 18 1 1 2 4 .173 

Dunn, Brooklyn 20 64 3 11 14 3 2 .172 

Bell. Brooklyn 29 47 1 8 14 2 2 5 .170 

Lush, St. Louis 33 S9 7 15 17 2 4 1 .169 

Ferguson, Boston 37 65 S 11 14 1 1 3 .161 

Willis. Pittsburg 41 103 9 17 13 1 4 .165 

Mathewson, New York 56 129 11 20 26 2 2 7 .155 

McQuillan. Philadelphia 48 119 4 IS 19 1 6 .151 

Ewing. Cincinnati 37 94 5 14 17 3 4 2 .14* 

Lundsren. Chicago 23 47 2 7 7 5 .149 

Leever. Pittsburg 33 61 5 9 11 1 2 1 .148 

McCarthy. Cin.-Pitts.-Bos 17 41 4 6 710040 .146 

Boultes. Boston 17 21 2 3 3 4 1 .143 

Flaherty, Boston 31 86 8 12 16 2 5 2 .140 

Fromme, St. Louis 20 36 2 5 5 2 .139 

Dubuc. Cincinnati 16 29 2 4 5 1 2 .133 

Higginbotham. St. Louis 19 38 3 5 5 1 .132 

Overall. Chicago 37 70 3 9 12 1 1 8 1 .129 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



335 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING— (Continued). 

Name and Club. G. AB. R. H. TB. 2B.3B.HR.SH.SB. PC. 

Pastorius, Brooklyn 28 62 4 8 10 1 3 .12? 

Beebe, St. Louis 29 56 1 7 9 1 3 .12S 

Brain, Cincinnati-New York 25 72 6 9 9 1 1 .125- 

Corridon, Philadelphia 27 73 2 9 9 3 .123 

Fraser, Chicago 26 50 3 6 7 1 5 1 .120- 

Wilhelm, Brooklyn 42 111 4 12 12 5 .108 

Pfiester, Chicago 33 79 2 8 9 1 4 1 .101 

Foxen, Philadelphia 22 53 5 5 1 1 .094 

Strang, New York 22 53 8 5 5 2 5 .094 

Coakley, Cincinnati-Chicago 36 82 3. 7 8 1 5 .085 

Camnitz, Pittsburg 38 72 4 6 6 6 .08a 

Campbell, Cincinnati 35 72 1 6 8 1 6 .083. 

McGlynn, St. Louis 16 26 2 2 1 .077 

Sparks, Philadelphia 33 77 1 4 4 11 .052. 

Sallee, St. Louis 25 41 2 2 2 1 .049 

Malarkey, New York 15 6 1 .000- 

CLUB BATTING. 

Name and Club. G. AB. R. H. TB. 2B. 3B. HR. SH. SB. PC. 

New York 157 5006 651 1339 1667 182 43 20 250 181 .267 

Chicago 158 5085 625 1267 1632 196 56 19 270 212 .249 

Pittsburg 155 5109 585 1263 1696 162 98 25 184 186 .247 

Philadelphia 155 5012 503 1223 1586 194 68 11 213 200 .244 

Boston 156 5131 537 1228 1502 137 43 17 194 134 .239 

Cincinnati 155 4879 488 1108 1433 129 77 14 214 196 .227 

St. Louis 154 4959 372 1105 1404 134 57 17 164 150 .223 

Brooklyn 154 4897 375 1044 1358 110 60 28 166 113 .213 

Fly Ball Sacrifice Hits— New York, 49; Cincinnati, 47; Chicago, 47; Pitts- 
burg, 42; Boston, 41; Philadelphia, 28; St. Louis, 23; Brooklyn, 12. 

Three Leading Fly Ball Sacrifice Hitters— Seymour, New York, 13; 
Donlin, New York, 10; Tinker, Chicago, 8. 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 
FIRST BASEMEN. 



Name and Club 


G. 


PO. A. E. TC.PC. 


Name and Club. 


G. 


PO. A. E. 


TC.PC. 


Gill, Pi., 


25 


237 7 244 1000 


Bransfield, Ph. 


143 1472 89 22 


1583 


.986 


Stem, Bo., 


19 


192 9 1 202 .995 


Hoblitzell, Ci., 


32 


313 24 5 


342 


.985 


Tenney, N.Y., 


156 1624 117 18 1759 .990 


Swacina, Pi., 


50 


501 19 9 


529 


.983 


Ganzel, Ci., 


108 1116 61 12 1189 .990 


Jordan, Br., 


146 


1462 55 28 


1545 


.980 


Chance, Ch., 


126 


1291 86 15 1392 .989 


Hofman, Ch., 


37 


357 20 11 


388 


.972 


McGann, Bo., 


121 1229 93 16 1338 .988 


Kane, Pi., 


40 


378 24 14 


416 


.966 


Storke, Pi., 


49 


481 17 6 504 .988 


McLean, Ci., 


19 


165 5 8 


178 


.555 


Konetchy, S.L. 


154 1610 122 24 1756 .986 














SECOND BASEMEN. 










Knabe, Ph., 


151 


344 470 26 840 .969 


Gilbert, S.L., 


89 


222 254 24 


500 


.952 


Ab'ticchio,Pi., 


144 


268 423 22 713 .969 


Hofman, Ch., 


22 


41 55 6 


102 


.941 


Ritchey, Bo., 


120 


325 368 24 717 .987 


Doyle, N.Y., 


102 


180 291 33 


504 


.935 


Hannifin, Bo., 


22 


55 64 4 123 .967 


Alperman, Br., 


42 


74 110 13 


197 


.934 


Pattee, Br., 


74 


158 246 15 419 .964 


Zimmerman, Ch 


20 


41 43 7 


91 


.923 


Hummel, Br., 


43 


105 127 9 241 .963 


Charles, S.L., 


65 


123 182 26 


331 


.921 


Evers, Ch., 


122 


237 361 25 623 .960 


Herzog, N.Y., 


42 


61 125 16 


202 


.921 


Huggins, Ci., 


135 


302 406 30 738 .959 


Egan, Ci., 


18 


35 47 10 


92 


.891 






THIRD BASEMEN. 










Devlin, N.Y. 


157 


203 331 30 564 .947 


Sweeney, Bo., 


123 


174 277 34 


485 


.930 


Steinfeldt.Ch., 


150 


166 275 28 469 .940 


Hannifin, Bo., 


35 


53 79 10 


142 


.930 


Leach, Pi., 


150 


199 293 33 525 .937 


Byrne, S.L., 


122 


183 248 35 


466 


.925 


Mowrey, Ci., 


56 


51 110 11 172 .936 


Lobert, Ci., 


99 


121 181 26 


328 


.921 


Sheehan, Br., 


145 


174 280 34 488 .930 


Courtney, Ph., 


22 


18 36 5 


59 


.915 


Grant, Ph., 


134 


197 271 35 503 .930 


Charles, S.L., 


23 


35 45 8 


88 


.909 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



Name and Club. 
Tinker, Ch., 
Dahlen, Bo., 
Wagner, Pi., 
Lewis, Br., 
Doolan, Ph., 
Morris, S.L., 
Hulswitt, Ci., 



Bescher. Ci., 
Barry, N.Y., 
Burch, Br., 
Del'h'ty, S.L., 
Donlin, N.Y., 
Catterson, Br., 
Clarke, Pi., 
Hummel, Br., 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING— (Continued). 
SHORTSTOPS. 
G. PO. A. E. TC.PC. NameandClub. G. PO. A. E.^TC.PC. 



314 570 39 
291 553 43 
354 469 50 
227 352 35 
269 419 45 
47 75 8 
242 368 42 



923 .958 

887 .952 

873 .943 

614 .943 

733 .939 

130 .938 

652 .936 



Bridwell, N.Y. 
Lobert, Ci., 
Charles, S.L., 
McMillan, Br., 
Reilly, S.L., 
O'Rourke, S.L. 
Osteen, S.L., 



LEFT FIELDERS. 



32 82 

20 27 

47 91 

138 243 

28 42 

18 39 

150 346 

90 155 



84 1000 
27 1000 
101 .980 
260 .977 
44 .977 
41 .976 
15 10 371 .973 
18 5 178 .972 



Shannon, NY-Pi. 65 98 4 3 105 .971 M'C'r'k,NY-Ph. 59 91 3 8 102 .922 



Magee, Ph., 
Paskert, Ci., 
Slagle, Ch., 
Sheckard, Ch., 
Bates, Bo., 
Brain, Ci., 
Kelley, Bo., 
Lobert, Ci.. 



147 
35 
31 
29 
29 
53 
17 



277 486 55 
64 87 13 
57 95 15 
52 86 20 
34 69 16 
80 171 41 
30 42 13 



818 .933 

164 .921 

167 .910 

158 .873 

119 .866 

292 .860 

85 .847 



142 279 15 9 303 .970 

77 174 10 7 191 .963 

26 52 2 54 .963 

115 201 13 10 224 .955 

101 185 13 10 208 .952 

16 36 2 38 .947 

38 71 5 5 81 .938 

21 37 2 3 42 .929 



CENTER FIELDERS. 



Slagle. Ch. 
Kane, Ci., 
Thomas, Ph. -Pi. 107 
Browne, Bo., 17 

Burch, Br., 44 



5 147 6 

120 292 15 

282 7 



3 156 .981 

6 313 .980 

7 296 .976 
1 38 .974 
3 104 .971 



Osborn, Ph.. 146 342 14 12 368 .967 

Beaumont, Bo. 121 259 17 10 286 .965 



Howard, Ch., 30 52 12 55 .964 Murray, S.L. 



Shannon, Pi., 
Hofman, Ch., 
Wilson, Pi., 
Maloney, Br., 
Paskert, Ci., 
Seymour, N.Y. 
Shaw, S.L., 



20 66 2 3 71 .958 

50 US 9 6 133 .955 

34 56 3 3 62 .952 

95 224 11 12 247 .951 

34 72 5 4 81 .951 

155 340 29 20 389 .949 

67 146 18 10 174 .943 

87 183 11 19 213 .911 



RIGHT FIELDERS. 



Bayless, Ci., 
Schulte, Ch., 
Donlin, N.Y., 
Howard, Ch., 
Titus. Ph., 
Barry. SL.-NY. 
Mitchell, Ci., 



17 23 5 

89 118 8 

127 197 20 

51 77 9 

149 215 22 

79 115 10 

115 188 16 



Murray, S.L., 67 
Becker, Pi.-Bo., 59 55 12 3 70 .957 Shaw, S.L., 22 



28 1000 


127 


.992 


222 


.977 


89 


.966 


246 


.963 


130 


.962 


213 

70 


.958 
.957 



Burch, Br., 27 57 9 3 69 .957 

Wilson, Pi., 109 200 17 10 227 .956 



Lumley, Br., 116 


157 


13 8 


178 


.955 


Shannon, NY-Pi. 21 


38 


4 2 


44 


.955 


Moeller, Pi., 23 


38 


2 


40 


.950 


Browne, Bo., 109 


186 


16 12 


214 


.944 



CATCHERS. 
PO. 

194 
470 
657 



Name and Club. G. 

Bliss St. Louis 43 

Bergen, Brooklyn 99 

Bresnahan, New York 139 

Kling, Chicago 117 

Phelps, Pittsburg 20 69 

Jacklitsch, Philadelphia... 30 126 

Needham, Ne v York 47 168 

Smith, Boston 38 143 

Gibson, Pittsburg 140 607 

Bowerman, Boston 63 228 

P. Moran, Chicago 45 242 

Dooin, Philadelphia 132 554 

McLean, Cincinnati 69 280 

Schlei, Cincinnati 88 355 

Ritter, Brooklyn 37 132 

Dunn, Brooklyn 20 93 

Graham, Boston 62 242 

Ludwig, St. Louis 62 227 

Hostetter, St. Louis 41 182 

C. Moran, St. Louis 16 58 



A. 

59 
137 
140 
149 
15 
38 
30 
52 
136 
69 
56 
191 



87 
56 
26 



E. 

2 

7 
12 
16 

2 

4 

5 

5 
21 

9 
10 
26 
14 
18 

7 

6 
15 
16 
13 



91 11 9 111 .919 
33 4 4 41 .902 



TC. 

255 
614 



168 
203 
200 
764 



771 
376 
469 
183 
141 
33" 
330 
251 
93 



PB. 

5 
7 

17 
4 



PC. 

.992 
.989 
.985 
.979 
.977 
.976 
.975 
.975 
.973 
.971 
.968 
.966 
.963 



.957 
.955 
.952 
.948 
.903 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



337 



CLUB FIELDING. 



Club. G. PO. A. E. TC.PB. PC. 

Chicago. 153 4292 2051 205 6548 12 .969 

Pittsburg, 155 4201 1907 226 6334 8 .964 

Phila., 155 4157 2071 238 6466 19 .963 

New York, 157 4220 2086 250 6556 23 .962 



G. PO. A. E.TC. PB. PC. 
156 4157 2225 253 6635 10 .962 
154 4075 2044 247 6366 13 .961 
Cincinnati, 155 4085 1918 255 6258 21 .959 
St. Louis, 154 4039 2059 348 6446 24 .946 



Club. 
Boston, 
Brooklyn, 



PITCHERS' RECORDS. 

Record of those who pitched in fifteen or more games, arranged 
ing to percentage of victories: 

Field. H. B. St. W. E. T. Sh. 

Name and Club. G. PO. A. E.TC. PC. B. B. O. P. I. G. O. W. 

Reulbach, Chicago ..46 15 77 7 99 .929 12 105 133 5 4 1 6 24 

Mathewson, N. Y....56 27 141 2 170 .988 3 42 259 2 3 1 12 37 

Brow J , Chicago ....44 35 73 01081.000 5 49 123 6 5 9 29 

Maddox, Pittsburg... 36 8 77 3 88 .966 11 90 70 4 2 4 23 

Leever, Pittsburg.... 38 8 44 2 54 .963 6 41 28 3 2 4 15 

Willis. Pittsburg.... 41 11 87 1 99 .990 6 69 97 4 3 1 7 23 

Camnitz, Pittsbu-g. . . 38 7 64 6 77 .922 5 69 118 2 1 3 16 

Ames, New York IS 5 32 3 40 .925 1 27 81 2 7 

McCarthy, Ci.-Pg.-Bo. 17 4 36 1 41 .976 1 37 31 1 2 7 

Wiltse, New York... 44 25 89 2 116 .983 9 73 118 4 4 1 7 23 

Taylor, New York... 27 8 35 4 47 .915 4 34 50 4 1 1 8 

McGinnity, N. Y.... 37 10 50 5 65 .923 7 37 55 3 5 11 

Spade. Cincinnati ... 35 4 57 6 67 .910 5 85 74 1 3 3 17 

Corridon, Phila 27 13 78 5 96 .948 6 48 50 3 4 2 14 

Overall, Chicago .... 37 13 51 5 69 .928 2 78 167 6 2 1 4 15 

McQuillan, Phila. . . . 4S 14 95 6 115 .948 6 91114 5 3 7 23 

Fraser. Chicago 26 14 61 1 76 .987 6 61 66 7 4 11 

Pfiester, Chicago .... 33 13 56 2 71 .972 11 70117 5 1 2 3 12 

Weirner, Cincinnati.. 15 7 37 44 1.000 6 50 36 2 2 8 

Ewins:. Cincinnati.... 37 11 69 3 83 .964 5 57 95 7 3 1 4 17 

Leifield, Pittsburg... 34 6 62 5 73 .932 12 86 87 3 3 5 15 

Sparks, Philadelphia. 33 15 65 6 86 .930 8 51 85 4 2 16 

Crandall, New York. 32 15 52 1 68 .985 9 59 77 2 3 12 

Ferguson, Boston ... 37 9 45 6 60 .900 8 84 98 3 1 3 11 

Foxen. Philadelphia.. 22 9 51 3 63 .952 8 53 52 8 1 2 7 

Campbell, Cincinnati. 35 10 87 7 104 .933 10 44 73 3 1 2 12 

Rucker, Brooklyn. ... 42 13107 4124 .968 19125199 5 4 6 17 

Moren, Philadelphia.. 28 6 43 2 51 .961 2 49 72 5 4 8 

Dubuc, Cincinnati 16 7 26 2 35 .943 5 42 33 1 1 5 

Lindaman, Boston.... 43 9 68 2 79 .975 10 70 68 7 3 1 2 12 

Wilhelm, Brooklyn. .. 42 17 109 6 132 .955 6 83 99 5 3 6 16 

Richie, Philadelphia. 25 7 40 6 53 .887 6 49 58 3 3 1 1 7 

Flaherty, Boston .... 31 20 79 4103 .961 8 81 50 5 4 1 12 

I. Young, Bo.-Pg.... 32 10 42 7 59 .881 7 40 63 3 2 8 

Lundgren, Chicago... 23 6 34 1 41 .976 56 33 4 1 1 6 

Lush. St. Louis 38 15 73 7 95 .926 11 57 93 8 5 3 11 

Raymond. St. Louis. 48 12 108 8 128 .938 14 95 145 9 3 5 15 

Boultes, Boston .... 17 7 17 24 1.000 1 8 28 0100 3 

Coakley, Ci.-Ch 36 8 56 4 68 .941 4 70 68 1 2 5 10 

Mclntire, Brooklyn.. 40 6 74 4 84 .952 20 90 108 1 4 11 

Karger. St. Louis.... 22 10 33 2 45 .956 2 50 34 4 1 1 4 

Dorner, Boston 38 8 77 5 90 .944 15 77 41 2 1 3 3 

Beebe. St. Louis 29 9 54 2 65 .969 4 66 72 5 

Fromme. St. Louis.. 20 3 30 33 1.000 2 50 62 2 1 2 5 

Sallee. St. Louis 25 5 37 1 43 .977 3 36 39 2 1 1 3 

Higginbotham, St. L. 19 2 27 1 30 .987 3 33 33 7 1 1 3 

Bell. Brooklyn 29 2 51 1 94 .981 2 45 63 4 2 4 

Pastorious. Brooklvn. 2S 6 66 2 74 .973 7 74 54 6 3 2 4 

McGlvnn. St. Louis.. 16 1 29 4 34 .882 2 17 23 1 1 

Malarkey, New York 15 1 9 1 11 .909 1 10 12 1 

No-hit Games— Wiltse of New York vs. Philadelphia. July 4, A. 

innings.) ; Rucker of Brooklyn vs. Boston, September 5. 



accori- 




Bat. 


L. 


PC. 


7 


.774 


11 


.771 


9 


.763 


8 


.742 


7 


.682 


11 


.676 


9 


.640 


4 


.636 


4 


.636 


14 


.622 


5 


.615 


7 


.611 


12 


.583 


10 


.5S3 


11 


.577 


17 


.575 


9 


.550 


10 


.545 


7 


.533 


15 


.531 


14 


.517 


15 


.516 


12 


.500 


11 


.500 


7 


.500 


13 


.480 


19 


.472 


9 


.471 


6 


.455 


16 


.429 


22 


.421 


10 


.412 


18 


.400 


12 


.400 


9 


.400 


IS 


.379 


25 


.375 


5 


.375 


IS 


.357 


20 


.355 


9 


.303 


19 


.293 


13 


.278 


13 


.278 


S 


.273 


8 


.273 


13 


.211 


20 


.167 


6 


.143 


2 


.000 


M. 


(10 



338 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

Official American League Averages 

STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 
Club. Det. Clev. Chic. S.L. Bos. Ath. Wash.N.Y. Won. PC. 



Detroit 

Cleveland ... 

Chicago 

St. Louis ... 

Boston 

Athletic .... 
Washington 
New York .. 





9 


13 


12 


11 


14 


16 


15 


90 


588 


13 




14 


11 


12 


16 


8 


16 


90 


584 


9 


8 




11 


16 


13 


15 


16 


88 


579 


10 


11 


10 




7 


13 


15 


17 


83 


546 


11 


10 


6 


15 




9 


11 


12 


75 


487 


8 


6 


9 


8 


12 




11 


14 


68 


444 


5 


14 


6 


7 


11 


ii 




13 


67 


441 


7 


6 


6 


5 


10 


8 


9 




51 


381 



Lost 63 64 64 69 79 85 85 103 



CHAMPIONSHIP WINNERS IN PREVIOUS YEARS. 

1900— Chicago 607 

1901— Chicago 610 

1902— Athletics 610 

1903— Boston 659 



1904— Boston 617 

1905— Athletics 621 

1906— Chicago 614. 

1907— Detroit 613 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 

Name and Club. G. AB. R. H. SH. SB. 2B. 3B. HR. TC. 

Criss, St. Louis 64 82 15 28 1 6 .341 

Cobb, Detroit 150 581 88 188 14 39 36 20 4 .324 

Delehanty, Washington 83 287 33 91 9 16 11 4 1 .317 

Crawford, Detroit 152 591 102 184 23 15 33 16 7 .311 

Gessler, Boston 128 435 55 134 10 19 13 14 3 .308 

Thomas, Detroit 40 101 6 31 1 1 .307 

Thielman, Cleveland-Boston .... 14 23 4731210 .304 

Hemphill, New York 142 505 62 150 14 42 12 9 .297 

Mclntyre, Detroit 151 569 105 168 13 20 24 13 .295 

Rossman, Detroit 138 524 45 154 19 8 33 13 2 .294 

Bush, Detroit 20 68 13 20 4 2 1 1 .294 

Stovall, Cleveland 138 534 71 156 31 14 29 6 2 .292 

Schweitzer, St. Louis 64 182 22 53 7 6 4 2 1 .291 

Orth, New York 38 69 4 20 2 1 2 .290 

Lajoie, Cleveland 157 581 77 168 30 15 32 6 2 .289 

Unglaub, Boston-Washington ... 144 542 46 155 15 14 21 8 1 .286 

Blue, St. Louis-Philadelphia 17 42 4 12 1 1 2 .286 

Stone, St. Louis 148 588 89 165 13 20 21 8 5 .281. 

McConnell, Boston 140 502 77 140 11 31 10 6 2 .279 

Goode, Cleveland 46 154 23 43 4 7 1 3 1 .279 

Dougherty, Chicago 138 482 68 134 19 47 11 6 .278 

E. Collins, Philadelphia 102 330 39 90 15 8 18 7 1 .273 

Ferris, St. Louis 148 555 54 150 30 6 26 7 2 .270 

Cree, New York 21 78 5 21 1 1 2 .269 

J. Tannehill, Washington 27 45 1 12 1 .267 

Murphy, Philadelphia 142 525 51 139 23 16 28 7 4 .265 

Schmidt, Detroit 122 419 45 111 16 5 14 3 1 .265 

Hartzell, St. Louis 115 422 41 112 23 24 5 « 2 .265 

Keeler, New York 91 323 38 85 21 14 3 1 1 .263 

Anderson, Chicago 123 355 36 93 13 21 17 1 .262 

Schaefer, Detroit 153 584 96 151 43 40 20 10 3 .259 

Lord, Boston 145 558 61 145 36 23 15 6 2 .259 

Chase, New York 106 405 50 104 9 27 11 3 1 .257 

Cravath, Boston 94 277 43 71 8 6 10 11 1 .256 

Mullin, Detroit 55 125 13 32 3 2 2 2 1 .256 

Delehanty, New York 37 125 12 32 1 9 1 2 .256 

Thoney, Boston 109 416 58 106 9 16 5 9 2 .255 

Coombs, Philadelphia 78 220 24 56 9 6 9 5 1 .255 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 339 

INDIVIDUAL BATTING— (Continued). 

Name and Club. G. AB. R. H. SH. SB. 2B. SB. HR. PC. 

F. Jones, Chicago 149 529 92 134 28 26 11 ' 1 1 .253 

Wallace, St. Louis 137 487 59 123 19 5 24 4 1 .253 

Clymer, Washington 110 368 32 93 9 19 11 4 1 .253 

Freeman, Washington 154 531 45 134 9 6 15 5 1 .252 

Hahn, Chicago 122 447 58 112 13 11 12 8 .251 

Hoffman, St. Louis 99 363 41 91 11 17 9 7 1 .251 

O'Leary, Detroit 65 211 21 53 7 4 9 3 .251 

Stahl, New York-Boston 153 536 63 134 19 30 27 16 2 .250 

Niles, New York-Boston 113 394 47 98 14 21 14 6 5 .249 

La Porte, Boston-New York 101 301 21 75 8 6 4 8 .249 

T. Jones, St. Louis 155 549 43 135 34 18 14 2 1 .248 

H. Davis, Philadelphia 147 513 65 127 21 20 23 9 5 .248 

Wagner, Boston 153 526 62 130 21 20 11 5 1 .247 

Ball, New York 132 446 34 110 15 32 16 2 .247 

Isbell, Chicago 84 320 31 79 17 18 15 3 1 .247 

Burchell, Boston 32 69 6 17 3 .246 

Bradley, Cleveland 148 548 70 133 60 18 24 7 1 .243 

Hartsel, Philadelphia 129 460 73 112 8 15 16 6 4 .243 

J. Clarke, Cleveland 131 492 70 119 9 37 8 4 1 .242 

N. Clarke, Cleveland 97 290 34 70 7 6 8 6 1 .241 

Warner, Washington 51 116 8 28 5 7 2 1 .241 

Ganley, Washington 150 549 61 131 52 30 19 9 1 .239 

Milan, Washington 130 485 55 116 10 29 10 12 1 .239 

Turner, Cleveland 60 201 21 48 8 18 11 1 .239 

Conroy, New York 141 531 44 126 22 23 22 3 1 .237 

D. Sullivan, Boston-Cleveland... 104 359 33 85 15 15 7 7 .237 

Williams, St. Louis 148 539 63 127 22 7 20 7 4 .236 

Moriarity, New York 101 348 25 82 8 22 12 1 .236 

Powell, St. Louis 33 89 3 21 4 3 1 .236 

Carrigan, Boston 57 149 13 35 8 1 5 2 .235 

Hickman, Cleveland 65 197 16 46 2 2 6 1 2 .234 

McBride, Washington 155 518 47 120 16 12 10 6 .232 

C. Jones, St. Louis 74 263 37 61 6 14 11 2 .232 

Hinchman, Cleveland 137 464 55 107 19 9 23 8 6 .231 

O'Rourke, New York 34 108 5 25 3 4 1 .231 

White, Chicago 51 109 12 25 9 4 1 .229 

Cicotte, Boston 39 70 9 16 1 2 1 .229 

Young, Boston 36 115 9 26 2 3 .226 

Pickering, Washington 113 373 45 84 3 13 7 4 2 .225 

Bemis, Cleveland 91 277 23 62 10 14 9 1 .224 

McHale, Boston 21 67 9 15 4 4 2 2 .224 

Barry, Philadelphia 40 135 13 30 2 5 4 3 .222 

Rhoades, Cleveland 37 90 6 20 5 2 2 2 .222 

Oldring, Philadelphia 116 434 38 96 19 13 14 2 1 .221 

Altizer, Washington-Cleveland.. 96 294 30 65 24 15 2 3 .221 

Downs, Detroit 84 289 29 64 8 2 10 3 1 .221 

Schreck, Philadelphia-Chicago... 77 223 17 49 8 1 7 1 .220 

Speaker, Boston 31 118 12 26 3 2 2 3 .220 

Bender, Philadelphia 20 50 5 11 1 1 1 .220 

G. Davis. Chicago 128 419 41 91 30 22 14 3 .217 

J. Collins, Philadelphia 115 433 34 94 13 5 14 3 .217 

Nicholls, Philadelphia 150 550 58 119 31 14 17 3 4 .216 

L. Tannehill, Chicago 141 482 44 104 21 6 15 3 .216 

Perring, Cleveland 89 310 23 67 5 8 8 5 .216 

Coughlin, Detroit 119 405 32 87 15 10 5 1 .215 

Seybold, Philadelphia 48 130 5 28 3 2 2 .215 

Heidrick, St. Louis 26 93 8 20 3 3 2 2 1 .215 

Birmingham, Cleveland 122 413 32 88 11 15 10 1 2 .213 

Mcllveen, New York 44 169 17 36 4 6 3 3 .213 

Killifer, Detroit 28 75 9 16 6 4 1 .213 

Gardner, New York 20 75 7 16 3 2 .213 

Spencer, St. Louis 91 286 19 60 7 1 6 1 .210 

Shipke, Washington Ill 341 40 71 26 15 7 8 .208 



340 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

INDIVIDUAL BATTING— (Continued). 

Name and Club. G. AB. R. H. SH. SB. 2B. 3B. HR. PC. 

McFarland, Boston 19 48 5 10 1 2 1 

Parent, Chicago , 119 391 28 81 18 9 7 5 

D. Jones, Detroit 56 121 17 25 4 11 2 1 

Street, Washington 131 394 31 81 9 5 12 7 1 

J. Donahue, Chicago 93 304 22 62 8 14 8 2 

Altrock, Chicago 23 49 6 10 1 1 2 

Dineen, St. Louis 27 59 4 12 1 1 

Stephens, St. Louis 47 150 14 30 3 4 1 

Weaver, Chicago 15 35 1 7 1 1 

Donahue, Boston 35 86 8 17 2 2 1 

S. Smith, Philadelphia-St. Louis 73 204 14 40 4 2 12 1 

Elberfeld, New York 19 56 11 11 2 1 3 

Schlitzer, Philadelphia 23 46 1 9 1 

Hughes, Washington 43 87 7 17 8 1 3 

Atz, Chicago 83 206 24 40 12 9 3 

W. Sullivan, Chicago 137 430 40 82 21 15 8 4 

Criger, Boston 84 237 12 45 7 1 4 2 

Blair, New York 76 211 9 40 6 4 5 1 1 

F. Smith, Chicago 43 106 15 20 6 1 7 

Lake, New York 44 112 6 21 1 2 4 1 1 

Edmonson, Washington 26 80 5 15 4 1 

Manning, New York 44 91 7 17 1 1 2 2 

Cates, Washington 40 59 5 11 5 1 1 

Kohoe. Washington 17 27 1 5 1 

Howell, St. Louis 41 120 10 22 3 7 1 

Falkenberg, Washington-Cleve. . . 25 44 6 8 1 

Powers, Philadelphia 62 172 8 31 6 1 6 1 

Chesbro, New York 44 100 8 18 3 ' 2 1 

Plank, Philadelphia 36 89 4 16 1 1 4 

Owen, Chicago 25 50 3 9 1 1 3 

Liebhardt, Cleveland 38 80 4 14 10 4 1 

W T alsh, Chicago 66 157 10 27 8 2 7 1 1 

Kleinow, New York 96 279 16 47 8 5 3 2 1 

Johnson, Washington 36 79 7 13 5 3 2 

Vickers, Philadelphia 53 106 4 17 4 3 

Willett, Detroit 30 67 4 11 2 1 

Winter, Boston-Detroit 29 67 4 11 2 1 

Newton, New York 23 25 3 4 1 1 

Donovan, Detroit 30 82 5 13 1 2 1 

Manush, Philadelphia 23 77 6 12 2 2 2 1 

Joss, Cleveland 42 97 6 15 3 3 3 2 

Moran, Philadelphia 19 59 4 9 2 1 

Burns, Washington 23 54 1 8 1 2 

Sweeney. New York 32 82 4 12 2 2 

Barr, Philadelphia 19 56 4 8 1 2 

Killian, Detroit 28 73 5 10 3 

Purtell, Chicago 26 69 3 9 6 2 2 

Morgan, Boston 30 63 4 8 5 1 

Summers, Detroit 40 113 6 14 4 2 

Smith, Washington 30 65 5 8 5 1 1 

Graham, St. Louis 21 42 5 2 

Pelty, St. Louis 21 42 3 5 4 

Waddell, St. Louis 43 91 4 10 3 4 1 

Berger, Cleveland 29 74 3 8 5 0, 3 

Check, Cleveland 27 48 5 5 3 1 

Keeley, Washington 31 49 3 5 6 1 

Hosg, New York 24 43 1 4 1 

Bailey, St. Louis 22 34 3 3 2 

Shaw. Chicago 32 49 4 1 1 

rDygert, Philadelphia 41 75 5 6 5 

Pavne, Detroit 20 45 3 3 4 1 

Manuel, Chicago 17 15 1 1 

Steele, Boston 16 39 4 2 1 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



341 



CLUB BATTING. 

Name and^Club. G. AB. 

Detroit 154 5113 

Boston 155 5045 

St. Louis 155 5155 

Cleveland 157 5114 

New York 155 5084 

Washington 155 5037 

Chicago 15S 5030 

Philadelphia 157 5066 



R. 


H. 


PC. 


646 


1348 


.264 


564 


1248 


.247 


544 


1264 


.245 


568 


1223 


.239 


459 


1192 


.234 


479 


1181 


.234 


537 


1131 


.225 


486 


1132 


.223 



Name and Club. 
Donahue, Chi., 
Stovall, Cle., 
Isbell, Chi., 
T. Jones, St. L., 
H. Davis, Phila., 
Stahl, N. Y.-Bos., 
Rossman, Det., 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING. 
FIRST BASEMEN. 
G. PO. A. E. PC. Name and Club. G. PO. A. E. PC. 
[ Unglaub, Bos.-Wash. 76 783 54 16 .981 



132 1508 
65 824 
155 1616 
147 1410 



86 16 
46 9 

90 24 
86 22 
46 15 
138 1429 102 29 .981 



.986 



Chase, N.Y., 
Freeman, Wash., 
Moriarty, N.Y., 
Crawford, Det., 
Hickman, Clev., 



98 1020 
154 1548 
52 536 
17 176 
20 214 



54 22 .980 
66 41 .975 
26 15 .974 
13 6 .969 
15 8 .966 



SECOND BASEMEN. 



Unglaub, Bost.-Wash, 
Barry, Phila., 
Murphy, Phila., 
Lajoie, Clev., 
Williams, St.L., 
Delehanty, Wash., 
G. Davis, Chic, 
Altizer, Wash. -Clev., 
Killifer, Det., 
Schaefer, Det., 



Ferris, St.L., 
Schaefer, Det., 
Coughlin, Det., 
Purtell, Chic, 
Conroy, N.Y., 
Bradley, Clev., 
Tannehill, Chic, 
Manush, Phila., 



Turner, Clev., 
Wallace, St.L., 
Bradley, Clev., 
McBride, Wash., 
Bush. Det., 
Wagner, Bos., 
Parent, Chic, 
Perring. Clev., 
E. Collins, Phila., 



Speaker. Bos., 
Cree. N.Y.. 
Coombs. Phila.. 
Sullivan. Bos. -Clev. , 
Mclntyre, Det.. 
Hinchman. Clev., 



27 67 80 4 
20 29 56 3 
56 144 162 11 
156 450 538 37 
148 352 445 31 
80 181 232 16 
95 191 314 21 
38 68 119 8 
16 30 35 3 
58 122 160 15 



Nicholls, Phila., 
Gardner, N.Y., 
E. Collins, Phila., 
LaPorte, Bos.-N.Y., 
McConnell, Boston, 
Atz, Chic, 
Niles, N. Y.-Bos., 
Downs, Det., 
Isbell, Chic, 



23 51 58 6 .948 

20 49 59 6 .947 

47 111 127 14 .944 

53 90 171 16 .942 

127 237 349 38 .939 

46 82 137 15 .936 

93 183 240 30 .934 

82 180 265 36 .925 

18 40 58 9 .916 



THIRD BASEMEN. 



148 222 316 27 .952 
29 35 65 5 .952 
119 129 214 21 .942 
25 18 60 5 .940 
119 179 249 28 .939 
118 142 209 23 .939 
136 135 341 33 .935 
20 27 29 4 .933 



Shipke, Wash., 
Collins, Phila., 
Unglaub, Wash. -Bos. 
Perring, Clev.. 
Moriarty, N.Y., 
Lord, Bos., 
Altizer, Wash. -Clev., 



SHORTSTOPS. 

17 27 66 4 .95910'Leary, Det., 

137 286 510 41 .951 Schaefer, Det., 

30 50 87 7 .951 ! Elberfeld, N.Y., 

155 372 568 52 .948 Nicholls, Phila., 

20 42 63 7 .938 G. Davis, Chic, 

153 373 569 61 .932 Ball, N.Y., 

118 212 442 49 .930 Hinchman, Clev., 

48 74 159 18 .928 Hartzell, St.L., 

28 60 61 10 .924' 



OUTFIELDERS. 

31 37 8 1000iMcHale, Bos., 

21 35 4 1000 1 F. Jones. Chic, 

47 92 6 1 . 990 i Crawford, Det., 

99 195 18 4 .982|Hahn. Chic, 

151 329 17 8 .977 Ganley. Wash., 

75 106 13 3 .975 ! J. Clarke, Clev., 



110 111 190 22 


.932 


115 117 


216 26 


.928 


39 44 


98 11 


.928 


41 59 


77 11 


.925 


28 43 


76 10 


.922 


144 181 271 49 


.902 


16 19 


26 5 


.900 


64 130 179 27 


.920 


68 162 254 37 


.918 


17 36 


51 S 


.916 


120 221 


370 56 


.913 


23 51 


65 11 


.913 


130 268 438 80 


.898 


51 88 185 33 


.892 


18 33 


53 12 


.878 


19 30 


2 1 


.970 


149 288 


17 10 


.968 


134 252 


9 8 


.967 


119 160 


4 6 


.965 


150 280 


13 11 


.964 


131 220 


13 9 


.963 



342 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING— C 


OUTFIELDERS — (Continued) 






Name and Club. 


G. PO. 


A. 


E. 


PC. 


Name and Club. 


G. PO. 


A. E. 


PC. 


C. Jones, St.L., 


72 


116 


13 


5 


.963 


Stone, St.L., 


148 274 


11 16 


.947 


Murphy, Phila., 


83 145 


11 


6 


.963 


Dougherty, Chic, 


128 173 


7 10 


.947 


Anderson, Chic, 


90 


96 


9 


4 


.963 


Cobb, Det., 


150 212 


23 14 


.944 


Hoffman, St.L., 


99 185 


19 


8 


.962 


Hartzell, St. L., 


82 117 


15 8 


.943 


Hartsel, Phila., 


129 211 


6 


9 


.960 


Oldring, Phila., 


116 246 


9 16 


.941 


D. Jones, Det., 


32 


67 


5 


3 


.960 


Pickering, Wash., 


98 135 


6 9 


.940 


Milan, Wash., 


122 265 


18 


12 


.959 


Hemphill, N.Y., 


142 285 


13 20 


.937 


Birmingham, Clev 


., 121 250 


20 12 


.957 


Keeler, N.Y., 


88 123 


9 9 


.936 


Delehanty, N.Y., 


36 


64 


2 


3 


.957 


Clymer, Wash.. 


82 


81 


16 7 


.933 


Heidrick, St.L., 


25 


42 


3 


2 


.957 


Stahl, N.Y.-Bos., 


67 111 


14 9 


.933 


Schweitzer, St.L., 


55 


86 


14 


5 


.952 


Cravath, Bos., 


77 128 


7 11 


.925 


Altizer, Wash. -Clev., 24 


55 


5 


3 


.952 


Seybold, Phila., 


34 


32 


3 3 


.921 


Turner, Clev., 


36 


38 


2 


2 


.952 


Hickman, Clev., 


28 


34 


5 4 


.907 


Moran, Phila., 


19 


39 


1 


2 


.952 


LaPorte, Bos.-N.Y., 16 


17 


1 2 


.900 


■Gessler, Bos., 


126 162 


8 


9 


.950 


Edmonson, Wash. 


24 


34 


2 5 


.878 


Mcllveen, N.Y., 


44 


70 


4 


4 


.949 


Goode, Clev., 


42 


60 


11 


.849 


Thoney, Bos., 


101 208 


12 12 


.948 


















PITCHERS. 










Thielman, Clev. -Bos., 12 


1 


28 


1000 


Graham, St.L., 


21 


6 


35 2 


.953 


Glaze, Bos., 


10 


1 


7 


1000 


Steele, Bos., 


16 


11 


30 2 


.953 


White, Chic., 


41 


28 


116 


2 


.986 


Powell, St.L., 


33 


2 


56 3 


.951 


Berger, Clev., 


29 


8 


58 


1 


.985 


Coombs, Phila., 


26 


13 


42 3 


.948 


Chech, Clev., 


27 


7 


60 


1 


.985 


Chesbro, N.Y., 


44 


6 


94 6 


.943 


Smith, Chic, 


41 


23 


101 


2 


.984 


Summers, Det., 


40 


20 


90 7 


.940 


Rhoades, Clev., 


37 


18 


96 


2 


.983 


Johnson, Wash., 


36 


4 


56 4 


.938 


Smith, Wash., 


26 


2 


53 


1 


.982 


Owen, Chic, 


25 


6 


54 4 


.938 


Orth, N.Y., 


21 


6 


42 


1 


.980 


Vickers, Phila., 


53 


10 


83 7 


.930 


Pelty, St.L., 


20 


6 


43 


1 


.980 


Bender, Phila., 


20 


12 


28 3 


.930 


Dineen, St.L., 


27 


3 


44 


1 


.979 


Burns, Wash., 


23 


2 


69 6 


.922 


Dygert, Phila., 


41 


8 


79 


2 


.978 


Donovan, Det., 


29 


16 


39 5 


.917 


Falkenberg, Wn.-Cle. 25 


3 


42 


1 


.978 


Seiver, Det., 


11 


5 


16 2 


.913 


Hogg, N.Y., 


24 


5 


37 


1 


.977 


Arellanes, Bos., 


10 


2 


18 2 


.909 


Walsh, Chic, 


66 


41 


190 


6 


.975 


Cates, Wash., 


19 


8 


41 5 


.907 


Morgan, Bos., 


30 


11 


65 


2 


.974 


Tannehill, Bos.- Wash. 11 


5 


34 4 


.907 


Manning, N.Y., 


42 


3 


70 


2 


.973 


Newton, N.Y., 


23 


2 


27 3 


.906 


Schlitzer, Phila., 


23 


2 


30 


1 


.970 


Cicotte, Bos., 


38 


11 


65 8 


.905 


Plank, Phila., 


36 


17 


45 


2 


.969 


Bailey, St.L., 


22 





26 3 


.897 


Altrock, Chic, 


23 


20 


67 


3 


.967 


Hughes, Wash., 


43 


8 


87 11 


.896 


Carter, Phila., 


14 


7 


22 


1 


.967 


Waddell, St.L., 


43 


5 


79 10 


.894, 


Killian, Det., 


27 


15 


71 


3 


.966 


Winter, Bos. -Det., 


29 


16 


67 10 


.892 


Joss, Clev., 


42 


23 


109 


5 


.964 


Pruitt, Bos., 


14 


3 


21 3 


.889 


Mullin, Det., 


38 


21 


102 


5 


.961 


Manuel, Chic, 


17 


3 


20 3 


.885 


Howell, St. L., 


40 


21 


101 


5 


.961 


Lake, N.Y., 


37 


9 


64 10 


.880 


Willett, Det., 


30 


14 


SI 


4 


.960 


Keeley, Wash., 


28 


6 


64 10 


.875 


Liebhardt, Clev., 


38 


14 


78 


4 


.958 


Burchell, Bos., 


31 


5 


48 8 


.869 


Young, Bos., 


36 


5 


62 


3 


.957 


Doyle, N.Y., 


12 


1 


8 2 


.818 










CATCHERS. 










Name and Club. 


G. PO. 


A. 


E.PB.PC. 


Name and Club. 


G. PO. 


A. 


E.PB.PC. 


Sullivan, Chic, 


137 553 156 11 


9 


.985 


Kleinow, N.Y., 


89 281 116 14 4 


.966 


Spencer, St.L., 


88 398 109 


9 12 


.983 


Bemis, Clev., 


76 326 


74 15 10 


.964 


Warner, Wash., 


41 178 


38 


4 


1 


.982 


Stephens, St.L., 


45 193 


68 11 4 


.960 


Criger, Bos., 


84 380 120 10 14 


.980 


Donahue, Bos., 


32 128 


35 


7 2 


.959 


Schreck, Ph.-Ch., 


71 402 


96 11 


6 


.978 


Blair, N.Y., 


60 225 


58 13 6 


.956 


Smith, Ph. -St.L., 


55 295 


71 


9 


6 


.976 


Carrigan, Bos., 


47 203 


74 13 6 


.955 


Street, Wash., 


128 578 167 21 10 


.973 


Sweeney, N.Y., 


25 122 


26 


7 4 


.955 


Thomas, Det., 


29 124 


15 


4 


1 


.972 


Payne, Det., 


15 52 


10 


3 1 


.954 


N. Clarke, Clev., 


90 327 108 14 12 


.969 


Shaw, Chic, 


29 87 


15 


5 4 


.953 


Powers, Phila., 


60 303 


74 13 


3 


.967 


Weaver, Chic, 


15 32 


9 


2 


.953 


Blue, St.L. -Phil., 


14 74 


15 


3 


4 


.967 


Schmidt, Det., 


122 541 184 37 5 


.951 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



343 



CLUB FIELDING. 



Club. 


G. 


PO. 


A. 


E. 


PC. 


Club. 


Chicago, 
St. Louis, 
Cleveland, 


156 
155 
157 


4240 
4182 
4261 


2364 
2133 

2177 


233 

242 
260 


.966 
.963 
.961 


Washington 

Boston, 

Detroit, 



Philadelphia, 157 4183 1880 270 .957 New York 



G. PO. A. E. PC. 

155 4150 2120 279 .957 

155 4123 2102 303 .954 

154 4130 2082 305 .953 

155 4091 2037 340 .947 



PITCHERS' RECORDS 

Name and Club. W 

Walsh, Chicago 40 

Donovan, Detroit 18 

Joss, Cleveland 24 

Summers, Detroit 24 

Dineen, St. Louis 14 

Young, Boston 21 

Pelty, St. Louis 7 

Willett, Detroit 15 

Berger, Cleveland 13 

Chech, Cleveland 11 

Rhoades, Cleveland 18 

White, Chicago 19 

Mullin, Detroit 17 

Coombs, Philadelphia 7 

Waddell, St. Louis 19 

Falkenberg, Washington-Cleveland — 8 

Burchell, Boston 10 

Powell, St. Louis 16 

Hughes, Washington 18 

Killian, Detroit 11 

Howell, St. Louis 18 

Johnson, Washington 14 

Vickers, Philadelphia 18 

Smith, Chicago 16 

Liebhardt, Cleveland 15 

Morgan, Boston 13 

Cicotte, Boston 11 

Bender, Philadelphia 8 

Plank, Philadelphia 14 

Owen, Chicago 6 

Graham, St. Louis 6 

Manning, New York 13 

Schlitzer, Philadelphia 6 

Dygert, Philadelphia 11 

Steele, Boston 5 

Chesbro, New York 14 

Smith, Washington 9 

Keeley, Washington 6 

Burns, Washington 6 

Cates, Washington 4 

Lake, New York 9 

Altrock, Chicago 3 

Winter, Boston-Detroit 5 

Hogg, New York 4 

Orth, New York 2 



L. 


T. 


TO. 


Fin. 


PC. 


15 


1 


1 


9 


.727 


7 





3 


1 


.720 


11 


1 


2 


4 


.686 


12 





1 


3 


.667 


7 





1 


5 


.667 


11 


1 





3 


.656 


4 


1 


4 


4 


.636 


9 





1 





.625 


8 


1 


4 


3 


.619 


7 





4 


6 


.611 


12 





5 


2 


.600 


13 


1 


7 


1 


.594 


12 


1 


4 


5 


.586 


5 


2 


7 


5 


.583 


14 





5 


5 


.576 


6 





6 


5 


.571 


8 





7 


6 


.556 


13 





3 


1 


.552 


15 





3 


7 


.545 


10 





2 


4 


.524 


18 


1 


2 


2 


.500 


14 


1 


2 


5 


.500 


19 


1 


7 


8 


.486 


17 





4 


4 


.485 


16 





1 


6 


.484 


14 





1 


2 


.481 


12 





5 


10 


.478 


9 








1 


.471 


16 


1 


2 


1 


.467 


7 


1 


3 


8 


.462 


7 





7 


1 


.462 


16 





2 


9 


.448 


8 





6 


3 


.429 


15 





10 


4 


.423 


7 





3 


1 


.417 


20 


1 


2 


8 


.412 


13 





2 


2 


.409 


11 





2 


9 


.353 


11 


1 


4 


1 


.353 


8 


1 





6 


.333 


21 








7 


.300 


7 


1 


3 


7 


.300 


19 





3 


2 


.208 


16 





1 


2 


.200 


13 





3 


3 


.13* 



344 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

Attendance of 1908 

Not in the history of Base Ball has there been such patronage 
accorded the major leagues as was the case during the season 
of 1908. 

All records were completely snowed under in the desire of the 
Base Ball patrons to witness the contests. No doubt much of 
this was the result of the wonderfully close fight in both the 
National and the American Leagues. Perhaps the bulk of it 
was due to the struggle which was made in the National League, 
as that organization had been a sufferer for four years previous 
because of its one-sided races for the pennant. 

The attendance at the Polo Ground in New York, where the 
Giants were waging their plucky battle against the Chicago 
champions, surpassed anything which has been heard of in Base 
Ball history. Almost 1,000,000 spectators witnessed the contests 
in that city alone. It is true that the added game, after the 
season was over, helped to swell the total for the New York 
club, but it is also true that the team was liberally patronized 
from the day that the Polo Ground opened. 

That the New York American League club would have en- 
joyed a wonderfully large patronage had the players not slumped 
so frightfully after an excellent start, is assured. 

The combined attendance at the two New York grounds would 
have established a high water mark which might never have 
been equaled in a major league city. 

The National League showed a greater gain on the year than 
the American League, and if Brooklyn and St. Louis had been 
up to the mark, would have increased the figures by not less 
than 150,000 more patrons. 

It is but fair to say that in the following records the figures 
in Philadelphia, Boston, Pittsburg, Cleveland and Detroit were 
those given out by the management. In other cities the figures 
have been taken as they have been estimated by the critics who 
were present. 

In New York, where the attendance was exceptionally large 
and where it is impossible for even the most conservative always 
to make estimates within reason, the system was adopted each 
day of taking the lowest attendance and the highest attendance, 
and after dividing the difference between them adding it to 
the minimum reported attendance. It is quite likely that the 
figures are larger than they should be, even under that system. 
At the same time they are approximately within reason, and the 
best that can be done in view of the fact that it is out of the 
question to obtain the exact attendance. 

Total Attendance, 1908. 

League' ^iSe" TOTAL ATTENDANCE SlNCE 

New York; ,t/... ,880,700 312,400" 1Q01 

Chicago ......... 619,807 694,728, ajjwa. 

Philadelphia, ........ 415,171 445,567 m.m^^T * _, 

Boston ..».:,..„ 245 284 464 087: National American 

St. Louis .t,*.. 349,385 566,793} „ League. League. 

Pittsburg ..., v . 366.427 '. 1901 -....,-, 1,920,031 1,682,584 

Cincinnati..,^, 365.111 ...i... 1 1902 ,1,681,212 2.200,457 

Brooklyn ../*,«»,.- 272.900J \ 1903 ,.,2,300,362 2,345,888 

Detroit ....«•«»-_,, . . ', U98.058 1904 2,774,701 3,094,55» 

Cleveland .,.-.. j ...■....»." 414,732 1905.. 2,734,310 3,070,752 

Washington .......... £' 257,972 1906 .2,781,213 2,938,096 

= .. . 1907 ,2,737,793 3.398,764 

Totals a 3.514.285 lii. 3.054.837 1908 '. . ,. 3.514.28S 3,554,837 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



345 



ATTENDANCE FIGURES NATIONAL AND AMERICAN LEAGUES, 



•National league- 

. . CHICAGO. 

At Home. . , Abroad; 

Cincinnati .... 63,000 Cincinnati .... -18,900 

Pittsburg 127,647 St. Louis 71,300 

St. Louis 30,400 Pittsburg 90,323 

Philadelphia . . 75,770 Boston 42.905 

Brooklyn ..... 66,400 Brooklyn 40,500 

Boston 81,180 Philadelphia .. 62,276 

Hew York .... 175,410 New . York 245,500 

Total ....6"l9i807 Total . . . . 601.704 



At Home. 



NEW YORK. 



Chicago 245,500 Chicago 175,410 

Brooklyn 122,000 Philadelphia . . . 95,294 

Philadelpha ... 80.500 Brooklyn 75,000 

Boston 78,000 Boston 45,486 

St. Louis 72,500 Pittsburg 65,919 

Pittsburg 176,700 Cincinnati 63.000 

Cincinnati 105,000 St. Louis 50,200 



Total ...'..880,700 



Total 



670.309 



BROOKLYN. 



At Home. «•«*»»«*■.«. x BfL0AJ j i 

Chicago 40,500 Chicago 66,400 

New York 75.000 New York 122,000 

Boston ' 41,500 Boston 28,960 

Philadelphia . . . 29,500 Philadelphia . - 31.422 

Cincinnati .... 24,800 St. Louis 49,435 

St. Louis 22,100 Pittsburg i 34,140 

Pittsburg 39,500 Cincinnati ..... 45,040 

Total ..... 272,900 Total 368,897 

. _ - BOSTON. 

At Home. Abroad., 

Brooklyn 28,960 Brooklyn 41,500 

New York 45,476 New York 78,000 

Sv ca f °, L\ 42,905 Chicago 81,180 

Philadelphia .... 32,724 Philadelphia ... 43.685, 

Cincinnati 26.100 Cincinnati ..... 49,811 

Pittsburg 46,927 at. Louis 43 800 

St Louis 22,192 Pittsburg ..... 38,368 

Total 245.284 Total ...... 376.344 

»- o«w» PHILADELPHIA. 

AT Home - Abroad. 

Chicago 62,276 Chicago 75,770 

New York 95 294 New York .... 80,500 

Brooklyn 31,442 Brooklyn 29,500 

Boston 43,685 Boston 32,724 



Total 

At Home. 

Chicago . 

New York 

Brooklyn , 

Boston 

Philadelphia 

St. Louis 

Cincinnati 



Total ..'..; 366,427 



33,350 

415,171 *[ Total 340.916 

PITTSBURG. AM0ADi 

90.323 Chicago 117.647 

65,919 New York 176,700 

34,140 Brooklyn 39,500 

38,368 Boston 40,927 

*2,172 Philadelphia ... 85,197 

92,060 St. Louis 45,900 

43,443 Cincinnati 56,000 

Total . . . .• . 567,871 



Chicago ...... 

New York 

Brooklyn 

Boston 

Philadelphia. .. 

Pittsburg 

St. Louis .... 



CINCINNATI. , 

Abroad. 

48,900 Chicago 83,000 

63,000 New York 105,000 

45,000 Brooklyn 24,800 

49,811 Boston 26,100 

46.900 Philadelphia ... 52,914 

56,000 Pittsburg. 43,443 

55,500 St. Louis 60.900 



Total ..... 365,111 



Total 376,151 



• At Home. 

Chicago 

New York .. 
Brooklyn . . . 

Boston 

Philadelphia . . . 

?!£& *i>m 



65,300 Chicago 30,400 

50,200 New York . . ., 72,500 

49,935 Brooklyn . . 22,100 

43,800 Boston 21,992 

33,350 Philadelphia ... 44,363 

'~ Pittsburg 52,060 



Cincinnati ...'.", 60^00 Cincinnati '.'. '.'. 



AMERICAN LEAGUE. 
„ „ DETROIT. 

At Home. Abroad: 

Cleveland ...., 44,143 Chicago 

St. LOUIS » " ««iio 

Chicago •... 
Boston........ 57,452 

New York ..... 69,822 

Philadelphia .... 62,086 
Washington ..,<•_ 47,431 PhiladeTphia '. ', ', 
Total vei - 398,058 Total 

PHILADELPHIA. 
At Home. ^b, 

Detroit 55,905 Detroit . . 

New York ..... 73.726 New York 
Washington .., 59,541 Boston 
Boston 42,824 ~ 




. _ Washington . . 

^o,425 St. Louis . . . 

97,004 Chicago 

53.140 Cleveland ,.. 



66,000 

75,259 

! 31,075 



Total.,...,. 445,567 



Total ,.,.",438,292 



.- ^ BOSTON. 
. At Home. _ Abroad. 

.Detroit 84,056 Detroit 

Philadelphia .. 75,259 Philadelphia .., 
Washington ... 70,319 Washington . . . 
New York ..... 47,982 New York- 
Cleveland ..'. . . . 73,689 Cleveland 

St Louis 56,056 St. Louis 

Chicago £7,686. Chicago .. 

Total ..... 464,987 Total 

WASHINGTON. 




At Home. 

Detroit 

Philadelphia 



Abroad. 

8,905 Detroit 

0,075 Philadelphia ... 



Boston 45,658 Bostt.- . 

New York ..... 37.484 New York . 
St. Louis ...... 33,330 Chicago . . . 




Total .....257,972 Total .....431,6 

NEW YORK. 
At Home. * Abroad. 

Detroit 55.000 Detroit 69.7 

Philadelphia ... 46,000 Philadelphia .,.-73,7 
-" Boston , 47,9 



55.1 



Washington . . . 34,100 Washington 

Cleveland 52,300 Cleveland . . 

Chicago . 42,000 Chicago m.uio 

St. Louis 44,000 St. Louis 56,800 

Total «.x.. 312,400 Total .... .451,945 

CHICAGO. 



Abroad. 

Detroit 55,0 

99.383 Philadelphia .. . 63,4 



At Home". 
Detroit "... - .'-. '. i 
Philadelphi 

Boston 78,660 Boston 

Washington . . . 87.050 Washington . . . 40,3 

New York 111,026 New York 42,0 

St. Louis ' 82,160 Cleveland 77,9 

Cleveland . 100,860 St. Louis 65,8 



CLEVELAND. 



32,214 

New York 52.300 

Chicago 100,8f~ 



Boston 50,706 Boston 

Washington . . .*. 60,159 Washing^ 

New York 55,185 " 

Chicago 77.981 „ 

St. LwjIs ...... 55,195 St. Louis 125,452 

Total *.._,.. 414,732 Total ..... .481 ,798 

. tt fc . ST. LOUIS. 

At Home. Abroad. 

Detroit 125.452 Detroit 62.118 

•Philadelphia ... 86.800 .Philadelphia ... 97.004 

Boston 91.400 " 

Washington . . . 77.000 
56.800 



Total 



Total 298.915 



346 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

From Friends 

Many very kind letters of congratulation were received by 
the editor of the Guide following his appointment to the posi- 
tion. Throughout the United States many friends of the editor, 
who are Base Ball critics, were delightfully generous in their 
wishes for success. As a member of that fraternity of bright, 
clever and generous men, who write sparkling Base Ball criti- 
cisms and anecdotes from one ocean to the other, the editor of 
the Guide sincerely thanks his well wishers, and hopes that he 
will be able to merit half the praise so kindly extended. 

Point Loma, Cal., June 15, 1908. 
Mr. John B. Foster, 

New York City. 
Dear Mr. Foster: 

I am in receipt of yours of the 8th instant, advising me that you 
have accepted the invitation to become the Editor of the Spalding 
Official Base Ball Guide and the Spalding Official Base Ball Record, 
positions that became vacant by the recent death of our esteemed old 
friend, Mr. Henry Chadwick. 

The "Guide" was founded in 1877, while I was then a player in 
the game. When I recall the strenuous efforts that I put into this 
"Guide" for the first few years of its publication, both as editor and 
publisher, and compare the conditions surrounding professional Base 
Ball at that period with its present status, I cannot but feel that the 
"Guide" has exerted a beneficial influence in the remarkable develop- 
ment of the sport. The record shows that A. G. Spalding was the 
editor of the "Guide" for the first four years of its existence, with 
Louis Meacham of Chicago as associate editor in 1878. Mr. Henry 
Chadwick became its editor in 1881, and had just completed his 
twenty-eighth year of editorship when he died. According to this 
record you have become the fourth editor of the "Guide," and I 
sincerely hope it will continue to prosper and exert its proper in- 
fluence in the further development of the game under your editorial 
management. yourg 

A. G. SPALDING. 

New York, June 7, 1908. 
John B. Foster, Esq., 

New York, N. Y. 
My Dear Mr. Foster: 

I desire to congratulate you and the publishers of the Spalding 
Official Base Ball Guide upon your appointment to succeed the late 
Henry Chadwick as editor of the sterling and standard publication. 
For over thirty years the "Guide" has been identified with the 
interests of the National League and its impress upon the wonderful 
development of our National Game has been marked. I feel con- 
fident that the commanding position taken by the "Guide" in the 
annals of the game in the past under the able editorship of the 
lamented "Father of Base Ball" will be maintained in the future 
with you at the helm. 

On behalf of the National League and myself personally, I desire 
to tender my congratulations coupled with best wishes. 
Yours truly, 

HARRY C. PULLIAM, 
President National League of Professional Base Ball Clubs. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 347 

Mr. John B. Foster. Chicago, September 21, 1908. 

IMy Dear John: 

I learn with much gratification of your selection as editor of the 
•Spalding Guide. You are abundantly equipped to carry out this work, 
and I firmly believe the publication will excel, next spring, any of 
the previous numbers. If I can be of assistance to you in any man- 
ner, kindly command me. With best wishes, I remain.. 

Yours sincerely, 

B. B. JOHNSON, 
President American League. 

Mr. John B. Foster. New York, August 26, 1908. 

Dear John: 

It is with pleasure I learn that you have been appointed editor of 
Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide, to succeed our dear old friend. 
"Father'' Henry Chadwick. It is certainly a reward of merit and 
the thousands of readers of the "Guide" are to be congratulated that 
the editor selected is one that has always been for organized ball, for 
•clean manly sport and one that has always "boosted" and never 
"knocked" in his long journalistic career "covering" Base Ball, our 
"National Game. Yours sincerely. 

P. T. POWERS. 
President National Association Professional Base Ball Leagues. 

John B. Foster, Esq. Cincinnati, 0., June 12, 1908. 

Dear Sir: 

I understand that you have been appointed to succeed the late 
Henry Chadwick as editor of the Official National League Base Ball 
•Guide. If such is the case, I desire to congratulate you upon this 
.appointment and to assure you that if I can be of assistance at any 
time in any way. I will be glad to serve you. 

With best wishes, I am, 

Respectfully. 

AUGUST HERRMANN. 
President Cincinnati Exhibition Company. 

Chicago, June 13. 1908. 
lly Dear John: 

Your appointment to succeed the late Henry Chadwick as editor of 
the Oflicial Base Ball Guide, published by A. G. Spalding & Bros., is 
a deserved recognition of your ability and all-round merit. Personally 
I feel that no person could have been chosen, who is so eminently 
qualified to have editorial charge of the official organ of the time- 
honored National League. I trust that you will not have any hesi- 
tancy at any time to command me if I can be of any service to you 
in your new position. With kindest regards and wishing you much 
pleasure, as well as unbounded success in the new venture. I am. 
Very truly yours. 

CHARLES W. MURPHY. 
President Chicago National League Base Ball Club. 

Brooklyn. N. Y.. June 12, 1908. 
"My Dear John: 

I note that you have been appointed editor of Spalding's Guide. 
I congratulate you upon your appointment, and I am positive that 
the "Guide" for 1909 will be a "corker." If I can be of service to 
you at any time, I am at your command. 

Sincerely yours, 

C. H. EBBETS. 
President Brooklyn Base Ball Club. 



848 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDTC. 

Mr. John B. Foster, Boston, Mass., June 12, 1908. 

My Dear Sir: 

I am particularly pleased to be informed of your appointment as 
editor of the Official Base Ball Guide, and you will accept my sincere 
congratulations. 

I am convinced the "Guide" is in capable hands and I trust you 
will be spared to a long stewardship. 
Every success to you. 

Very truly yours, 

GEO. B. DOVEY, 
President Boston National League Base Ball Company. 

Mr. John B. Foster. Philadelphia, July 1, 1908. 

Dear Mr. Foster: 

It is with extreme gratification that I have learned that you have 
been appointed editor of the Spalding Official National League Guide. 
Please let me congratulate you upon receiving this appointment. Mr. 
Spalding is to be congratulated, as well as you in this instance, as 
I know no person so well qualified to fill this position, which demands 
an exact and infinite knowledge of Base Ball, better than you. It is 
only a fitting acknowledgment of your honorable career in Base Ball 
and the influence you have wielded for the good of the sport in your 
long newspaper experience. Very truly, 

WILLIAM J. SHETTSLINE, 
President Philadelphia Ball Company. 

Mr. John B. Foster, Cincinnati, Ohio, June 15th, 1908. 

My Dear John: 

I wish to break in on your thoughts long enough to congratulate 
you upon your selection as the successor of Henry Chadwick as editor 
of Spalding's Guide. 

I hope you'll live as long as the "Father of Base Ball" and feel 
sure the cause of clean, honest ball will have as firm a friend in the 
editorial chair as was the G. O. M. of the game. 

Sincerely yours, 

REX MCLFORD, Jr. 

Cleveland, Ohio, June 12, 1908. 
Mr. John B. Foster: 

I desire to congratulate you upon being chosen editor of the "Guide," 
to succeed the late "Father" Chadwick. There is no one in this 
country better fitted for this work than you are and you may be sure 
you have my best wishes. 

Yours very truly, 

CHAS. W. MEARS. 

Mobile, Ala., June 17, 1908. 
John B. Foster, Esq.: 

It is with much pleasure that I learn of your appointment as editor 
of "Spalding's Guide" to succeed the late Henry Chadwick and, with- 
out any desire to flatter you, I do not think his mantle could have 
fallen ©n fitter shoulders. I have read your contributions to "Sporting 
Life" from the time you wrote from Cleveland, as well as from 
Brooklyn, and I have always enjoyed them especially on account of 
the logical and impartial views you have taken of numerous difficult 
situations (from the standpoint of Base Ball politics). 
Yours truly, 

VICTOR T. LOEWENSTEIN, 
Mobile Correspondent "Sporting Life." 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 349 

Governor's Office. 
Hartford. Conn., August 20, 1908. 

Let me express my congratulations to you on your assumption of 
the editorship of the Base Ball Guide. Yours. 

C. E. JCLIN. 

Mr. John B. Fos1 Boston, Mass., June 30, 1908. 

n being the wearer of Henry Chao 
mantle. The "Father of Base Ball" has found a 

J. C. MORSE. 
tor The Ba^e Bull Magasine. 

Mr. John B. Foster. Pittsburgh. Pa. ; October 15. 190S. 

Dear Sir: 

I note with mu Hon that you have been appointed 

of the Spalding Base Ball Guide. Records of the National Game 
must be accni yon will give to the work of compHntien 

the painstak 

Wishing you every success in your _e~ undertaking, I am, 

Very trnly roars, 

BARNEY DBEYFUSS, 
President Pittsburgh A:hlr:i. . 

John B. F;s: c r. Esq. St Louis, Mo., July 5. 1908. 

My Dear Jack: 

With much delight I learn that you are to be the edi 
Spalding Guide to suceceed "Father" Chadwick. There is no person 
in the Unite om I would have more preferred to hav- 

tic position, and none whe is more deserving of it. 
I am glad that you have been selected and I hope you will hiv 
kinds Sincerely. 

ML S. ROBISON, 
President St. Louis National League Base Ball Club. 

Mr. John B. F:s:er. Auburn, N. Y., October 13. 1908. 

Dear Sir: 

The publishers of Spalding's Guide are to be congratulated upon 
seeurin- mpetcnt a writer as Mr. John B. Foster 

:;eed the late "Father" Chadwick as editor of the Spalding 
Guide. 

Mr. Fester is not onlr -7 able, but possesses unique capa- 

bilities as a compiler of statistics in the Base Ball world. 

The selection of Mr. Foster guarantees a continuation of the high 
standard upon which the Spald has been pine 

Sours respectfully, 

J. H. FARRELL. 
Secre: ion Professional Base Ball Plaj 

Messrs. A. G. Spalding & Bros. New York, October 14, 1908. 

Dear Sirs: 

May I be permitted to offer my congratulations to you and to those 
who an bdeh form the history of our 

great National Game, in the acquisition of Mr. John B. Foster as 
successor to Henry Chadwick as editor of Spalding's Guides- 
Daily, for many y Ball events as they occurred, 
Mr. Foster is equipped with a thorough knowledge of the game in the 
fullest sense of the term. Free from prejudice or self-conceit, your 
selection to carry on the work so well advanced by the lamented 
Chadwick is ideal. Yours very truly. 

JOHN T. BRUSH. 
President National Exhibition Company (New York Base Ball Club). 




1— "Str-r-i-ke Tuh" ("Silk" O'Loughlin); 2 — "Safe" ("Silk" 
O'Loughlin); 3 — "Out" (Silk" O'Loughlin); 4— "Strike" (Hank 
O'Day); 5— "Safe" (Evans); 6— "Safe" (Tom Connolly); 7— "Out" 
(Hank O'Day); 8— "Safe" (Hank O'Day). Photos by Conlon. 

CHARACTERISTIC ATTITUDES OF WELL KNOWN UMPIRES 
IN RENDERING DECISIONS, 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 351 

Semaphore Signals by the Umpires 

Two or three years ago Base Bali critics in the East and 
West began to agitate the question of signaling by the umpires 
to announce their decisions. 

At first the judges of play did not want to signal. They 
thought it detracted from their dignity to go through a dumb 
show resembling the waving of the arms of a semaphore. 

That did not deter the Base Ball critics from their stand. 
With good-natured persistence they urged upon the umpires the 
necessity of the new idea, and by and by the officials of' the 
league took up the subject and suggested that it would be 
worth a trial. 

It was finally experimented with and has been one of the 
very best moves in Base Ball as a medium of rendering decisions 
intelligible, and now there is not an umpire but uses him arms 
to signal. If he did not, two-thirds of the spectators at the 
immense crowds, which have been patronizing Base Ball for the 
last two years, would be wholly at sea as to what was trans- 
piring on the field, except as they might guess successfully. 

Right arm in the air with one finger pointing to tbe sky 
can be read for a long distance as a strike. When two fingers 
are upraised the crowd knows that it is two strikes, and it 
doesn't care to hear much about the third strike, because tbe 
movements of tho batter will certify to that. 

The left arm is used to signal the number of balls when it is 
necessary to do so. Some umpires never use the arm when a 
ball is called, and by refraining from doing so the crowd under- 
stands that it is not a strike. When the clamor is deafening and 
the pitcher calls for the number of balls the left arm is raised 
with as many fingers extended as balls have been called against 
the batter. 

Almost every umpire has a characteristic motion for calling 
the runner safe. As a usual custom, however, the arms extended 
with the palms of the hands turned down signify that tbe 
runner has reached the base legally. 

When calling a runner out most of the umpires use a sweep- 
ing motion of the arm which signifies that the unfortunate 
player is to return to the bench. 

An umpire may signal that a runner is safe, and on the 
very instant that he gives the decision the baseman may drop 
the ball. All the staff of the major leagues are quick to reverse 
the signal from a motion to leave the base, to the other motion 
of dropping the arms quickly with the palms of the Hands 
down. It is understood at once, both bv plavers and spec- 
tators. 

Even the older umpires, who were more loath to give their 
consent to the new system on the field, are now frank enougb 
to admit that it has been of invaluable assistance to them in 
making their decisions understood when the size of the crowd is 
such that it is impossible to make the human voice carry dis- 
tinctly to all parts of the field. 

Illustrations are appended showing the signals which are 
in vogue at the present time. 




"SLIDING TO SECOND." 
Bronze Trophy presented by A. G. Spalding in 1908 to the Publir 
Schools Athletic League of Greater New York, to be competed for 
annually by the High Schools in that organization. The first winner 
was Commercial High School, Borough of Manhattan, New York. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 353 

The A.G. Spalding Base Ball Trophy 

Extracts from Mr. A. G. Spalding^s address on the occasion of the Presen- 
tation of the Spalding Trophy to the winner s m of the High School Base 
Ball Championship of Greater JNew York, at the Commercial 
High School, Brooklyn, N. Y., October 7, 1908. 
When the Public Schools Athletic League announced its intention of 
holding annual Base Ball Championships for the high schools of Greater 
New York and asked me to supply a suitable trophy to commemorate 
these contests, it gave me pleasure to comply with this request. I 
have been officially informed that the representative team of the 
Commercial High School won this trophy for the first year on their 
remarkable record of eight victories and no defeats. While I con- 
gratulate this team on its success, I am almost sorry you did not lose 
at least one game just to acquaint you with the feelings of the other 
fellows. 

I am one of those who believe that athletic sports, properly con- 
trolled, are destined to become a very important factor in the education 
of our youth, and is entitled to its proper place in the curriculum of 
all institutions of learning. 

The classroom is the place to acquire the rudiments or basis of an 
education, and the athletic field is the place to apply that knowledge 
and instill into the mind of the growing boy the absolute necessity of 
self-control, poise, nerve, confidence and aggressiveness, so essential to 
properly fit the young man to successfully cope with modern conditions. 
In athletic sports, especially in Base Ball, a boy soon learns that losing 
his temper on the field is almost equivalent to losing the match. A 
player must have his wits about him all the time, for there is no 
place on the team for the dreamer or laggard. He must be alert and 
ready for any sudden emergency and should not lose his head and run 
to the clubhouse instead of second base, as one of the New York Giants 
did last week, which little simple piece of thoughtlessness cost the 
New Ycrks not only the loss of that particular game, but also the 
loss of the National League pennant and probably the World's Cham- 
pionship. 

When you are playing the second innings, focus your whole thoughts 
and energy on the minute details of that innings, and don't allow your 
mind to wander off to what may happen in the seventh or ninth 
innings, or how joyous you will feel if your team is victorious, or how 
sad a defeat will make you and your friends. A Base Ball player 
must school himself to be prepared for anything. He should not become- 
too much elated in victory or too much cast down in defeat, but 
remember that the victor of to-day may be the vanquished of to- 
morrow. 

Plenty of victories, interspersed with frequent defeats, makes for 
that self-poise in the boy that is so essential to the rounded-out man. 
The thoughtful boy that will apply the lessons he learns on the 
athletic field to the more serious problems of his after-life, will be- 
surprised how easy it is to overcome obstacles that at the time seem 
well nigh insurmountable. 

I understand that the two thousand boys in this school are fitting- 
themselves for commercial pursuits and a business life. Now let me 
assure you that if you will apply the same thoughtful consideration 
to the lessons taught on the ball field, that you should to the lessons- 
taught in the classroom, you will look back in. your mature years and 
say that the hard knocks you received on the athletic field in your 
youth and the practical experience you gained in meeting your equals 
in competitive sport gave you a better knowledge of human nature 
and the principles underlying modern business affairs than you ever 
acquired from books or lectures. 

In your classroom center your minds on the studies in hand and 
don't give a thought to athletic sports, but on the ball field give no- 
thought to your mathematics and grammar, but focus your mind on 
the game in progress. Be optimistic (there is no place on the team\ 
for the pessimist). Play hard, play to win, but play fair. 




1, McCall; 2, Pieper, Coach; 3, Harding; 4, Brigham, Mgr.; 5, Cur- 
rier; 6, Leonard, Capt. ; 7, Hartford; 8, Donovan, Trainer; 9, Aronson; 
10, Simons; 11, Harvey; 12, Lanigan. Tupper, Photo. 

HARVARD UNIVERSITY TEAM. 




1, Wylie; 2, Dines; 3, Murphy; 4, Williams; 5, Wheaton; 6, T. Jones; 
7, Rose; 8, Clifford; 9, Bomar; 10, H. Jones; 11, Van Vleck; 1°. 
Fels; 13, Mallory; 14, Philbin. 

YALE UNIVERSITY TEAM. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 355 

College Schedules for 1909 

AMHERST COLLEGE. 
March 26, 27, Trinity at Bu ? - N C ; £ 30, ^rthC.ro.jna 

Md.; 5, Pennsylvania at Philadelpn ia 1% g Bates; May 5, 
School at Amherst; 17 Bowdom 24 Vermont ^» , ^ 

Aggies; 12, Harvard at Cambridge, 19, > **£. a * Dartm outh; 31, 
Dartmouth at Hanover, N. Hg ^b £iUmms frWeton; 3, Penn- 
Williams at WiUiamstown- June 2, Fnnceton Brown; 

f 4 1Va B^n\fp a ro^S Texas; 26, Wesleyan at 

Mi'ddletown; 28, Wesleyan. 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 
March 31, Fordham at New To*; April 1. ™™*? P^Fdenc^ 
ton- 2, New York University at New J- ' J- /' wst- 24. Tufts; 26, 
l^Andover at Andover; 17, Amherst at Amherst z ^ 

s^»f^fiSn , & e * at er 

26^ Colby; 31, Bates at Lewiston; June 4, tfates. 

BROWN UNIVERSITY. . 

April 3, Bowdoin; 7, New Yor* ^T^jS^STS^ 

State; 14, Amherst Aggies; 17. Holy Cro^^ Car _ 

mont; 24, Princeton; 28, ^V s Tafavette- 11, Cornell at Ithaca; 
lisle; 5, Yale at New Haven, 8 ^|l af ^nss at Worcester; 17, Roch- 
ll Princeton at Mg^^^*** Wesfevan: 29. Michigan; 31, 
^ jWr Hfrvafd aVclmb^idgef 5, University of Pennsylvania; 

9, Columb!af ? 12, Amherst; 16, Alumni. 

COLUMBIA. . . 

March 27. St. Francis College of„ Brooklyn; 31, N^/ork Tramin. 
School April 3, Pratt. Instate; ^ Joan ^College ?alt i mor e; 
8, Georgetown at Washington StPvens Institute; 17, Princeton at 

10, Annapolis at Annapolis; 14, & St^ens insx , Newjork 
Princeton: 21, New York University at uu^ ^^ Pomt at 
Athletic Club_at Travers Island 29 > s ^ 8 acu |^ acu / e at Syracuse; 12 
JBt»i 5 at ™ A^ *£ 

LnW^^^^ 9 > Bro ™ at 

Providence. HARVARD. . „ 

April 21, 23, University of Virginia ^^harlotte ^^* ; 
Georgetown at Georgetown DC. , 2* > * at y er . 12 , Amherst; lo, 
Phillips Andover; 8^ 5 ol ^ ro ^ de nce 22, Princeton at Princeton; 26, 
Princeton; 19, ^ Brown at Providence, --, p M1 n p s Exeter at Cam- 

Princeton at >ew York (m case of tie^ or ^ wmiams; 5 Dart- 
bridge; 29, Cornell at Ithaca June 2, *™™> 19 Pennsylvania. State; 
H^WSWiS H^nl'july^Yale.at New York (in case 

NEW YORK UNIVHRSITY pennsylvania 

March 24, Princeton at Princeton; 2i, University or ^ 

at Philadelphia; 31 St -Francis; AP^ h B ^X mbia ; 24. Lafay- 

Army at West Point: 17, Lehigh _at Leh^n zi at Hartford; 

«&K s &tt^^Sp *- c - at Bay Ridge; 29 ' 

Rutgers. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 357 

PRINCETON. 
March 24, New York University; 27, Ursinus; 31, Yillanova- AnHi 
1, Bowdoin; 3, Fordham; S, Albright; 8. Navy at Annapolis- 9 vtni 
versity of Virginia at Chattqttesvile, Va. ; 10, Georgetown at WaJh 
ington; 14, Pennsylvania S\ate; 17, Columbia; 21, LehigV 22 
Lawrenceville at Lawrenceville-, 24, Brown at Providence- 28YTYW 
leyan; 30, West Virginia; May x Syracuse; 4, Virginia; 6, MA-cerT 
burg Academy; 8, Pennsylvania at Philadelphia; 11, Dartmouth^ 12 
Brown; 15, Harvard at Cambridge; 19, Pennsylvania ; 22 HarWd- 
26. Harvard in New York (in case of tie), ^ Montclair A(A at 
Princeton (in case of no tie) with Harvard; 29, H^iy Cross* Tiitia o 
Amherst; 5, Yale at New Haven; 9, Lafayette; 12, Yale- 16 Alumni 
vs. Undergraduates; 19, Crescent A.C. at Brooklyn; 22, Yale' at Nev 
York (in case of tie). 

UNITED STATES NAVAL ACADEMY. 

March 27, Gallaudet; 31, Maryland Agricultural Collt^. April 1 \ 
Pennsylvania State College; 3, Amherst; 7, Cornell; & '?riripeton« 
10, Columbia; 14, Fordham; 17, Bucknell; 20, Wester? taaVland 
College; 24, University of Pennsylvania; 28, University of MaijU Qc j. 
29, Agricultural and Mechanical College of North Carolina- m\ -,' 
University of West Virginia; 5, St. John's College; 6, Mou^t \> 5 k' 
ington Athletic Club; 8, Rutgers CoUege; 12, Rockill College \o" 
St. John's College; 15, Dickinson College; 19, Maryland Ath\j' 
Club; 20, Walbrook Athletic Club; 22, Georgetown College; 2v . * 
lisle Indian School; 29, United States Military Academy at 
Point. 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN. 

April 10, Kentucky at Lexington; 12, 13, Tennessee at Knoxvllll 
14, Castle Heights at Lebanon; 15, 16, 17, Vanderbilt at NashviU4 
19, Notre Dame at Notre Dame: 24, M. A. C. at Lansing; 28, Wow- 
ter; May 1, Notre Dame; 5, M. A. C; 8, Notre Dame at Notre 
Dame; 13, 15, Syracuse; 22, Pennsylvania State; 25, Wooster at 
Wooster; 26, Cornell at Ithaca; 27, 28, Syracuse at Syracuse; 29, 
Brown at Providence; June 5, Notre Dame. 

WEST POINT. 

April 10, New York University; 14, Union; 17, Tufts; 21, Lafay- 
ette; 24, Wesleyan; 28, Yale; May 1, Columbia; 5, University of 
Pennsylvania; 8, University of Virginia; 12, Dartmouth; 15, Carlisle 
Indians; 19. Williams; 22, Lehigh; 26, Trinity; 29, Navy; 31, Seventh 
Regiment, National Guard, New York; June 2, Fordham; 5, Amherst; 
9, Colgate. 

WILLIAMS COLLEGE. 

April 24, Massachusetts Agricultural College; 28, Brown; May 5, 
Cornell at Ithaca; 8, Wesleyan at Middletown; 12, Yale at New 
Haven; 15, Trinity; 19, West Point at West Point; 21, Dartmouth 
at Hanover; 26, Amherst at Amherst; 29, Dartmouth; 31, Amherst; 
, une 3, Harvard at Cambridge; 5, Holy Cross at Worcester; 8, 
Columbia; 12, Vermont; 16, Holy Cross; 18, Cornell; 21, Wesleyan. 

YALE. 
April 1, Georgetown at Washington; 3, University of Virginia at 
Norfolk; 5, Norfolk League Club at Norfolk; 6, 7, New York Na- 
tionals at Norfolk; 8, Norfolk League Club at Norfolk; 10, New 
York Nationals at New York; 14, Hartford League at Hartford; 17, 
Trinity; 21, Fordham; 22, Tufts; 24, Cornell at Ithaca; 28, West 
Point at West Point; May 1, Pennsylvania; 5, Brown; 7, University 
of Virginia; 8, Andover; 12, Williams; 13, Wesleyan; 15, Pennsyl- 
vania; 19, Amherst; 20, Syracuse; 22, Holy Cross at Worcester; 25, 
University of Vermont; 29, Columbia at New York; 31, Brown at 
Providence; June 2, Holy Cross; 5, Princeton; 8, Dartmouth; 12, 
Princeton at Princeton; 19, Cornell; 22, Princeton at New York (in 
case of tie); 24, Harvard at Cambridge; 29, Harvard; July 3, Harvard 
at New York (in case of tie). 




1.7 Pitman; 2, Flood, Trainer; 3, Drewes; 4, Warner; 5, Harlan, 
O&pt. ; 6, Clark; 7, Vaughn; 8, Dawson; 9, Reed; 10, Wister; 11, 
/ides; 12, Fish; 13, Ballin; 14, Warwick; 15, Wilson; 16, Hevniger; 
17, Dillon. McManus," Photo. 

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY TEAM. 




1, Wan<nke; 2, Files; 3, Caldwell; 4, Stanwood, Capt. ; 5, Bower; 6, 

Tefft, Atgr. ; 7, McDade; 8, Lawlis; 9, Manter; 10, Webster, Asst. 

Mgr.; 11, Harris. Webber, Photo. 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 




1, Latham; 2, Stangl; 3, Ross; 4, Baird; 5, Staehling; 6, Meigs; 7, 

Stagg, Coach; 8, Schommer; 9, Falls; 10, Pegues; 11, Cleary; 12, 

Gaarde; 13, Page; 14, Ehrhorn. Martyn, Photo. 

UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO TEAM. 



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1, Kennedy, Student Mgr. ; 2, Linthicum; 3, Barr; 4, Dunne; 5, 

Enzenroth; 6, McAllister, Coach; 7, Taft; 8, Giddings; 9, Sullivan, 

Capt.; 10, Kelly; 11, Patterson; 12, Wheeler; 13, Sincock; 14, Mellon. 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN BASE BALL TEAM. 




1, Fultz, Coach; 2, Lamphier; 3, Douglas; 4, Turner, Mgr.; 5, Ham- 
brich; 6, Stiles; 7, Jones; 8, Van Auken; 9, Dague; 10, Gilman; 11, 
Bacon, Capt.; 12, Wilson; 13, Battle; 14, Lange. 

UNITED STATES NAVAL ACADEMY, ANNAPOLIS, MD. 




1, Mountford; 2, Smith, Mgr.; 3, Teague; 4, Hyatt; 5, Anderson; 6, 

Harrison; 7, Meyer; 8, Houle, Coach; 9, McCoach; 10, Gonser; 11, 

Johnson; 12, Haverkamp; 13, Devers. McManus, Photo. 

UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY TEAM. 





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1, Barlow; 2, Auer, Mgr. ; 3, Culver; 4, Floche; 5, Rogers; 6, Mess- 
mer; 7, Barry, Coach; 8, Knight; 9, Thompson; 10, Nash; 11, Murkleston. 
Capt.; 12, Wolf; 13, Baley; 14, Johns; 15, Hoffman. 
UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN TEAM. 




1, Leach; 2, Dretchko; 3, Wilmot, Coach; 4, Cahaley; 5, Ernst; 6, 
Lange; 7, Boyle, Capt.; 8, Rand; 9, Resting; 10, Larson; 11, Bor- 
rowman; 12, Caldwell; 13, Mascot; 14, Walker; 15, Greene. 

L«e Bros., Photo. 
UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA TEAM. 



























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1, Pennock; 2, Taylor; 3, Jamieson, Asst. Mgr. ; 4, Brick; 5, San 
Souci; 6, Tracy, Mgr.; 7, Jube; 8, Palmer, Capt.; 9, Danahey; 10, 
McClure; 11, Michaels; 12, Washburn; 13, Kane. 
AMHERST COLLEGE TEAM. 




1, Fitzpatrick, Asst. Mgr.; 2, Bassford, Coach; 3, A. Schiess; 4, 
Baldwin; 5, E. Schiess; 6, Gargan; 7, McCaffrey; 8, Scanlon: 9, 
S. Quinn, Mgr.; 10, O'Reilly; 11, Mahoney; 12, Egan; 13. McDonald; 
14, Jackson; 15, Coffey; 16, T. Quinn; 17, Hartman. Foley, Photo. 
FORDHAM (N. Y.) UNIVERSITY TEAM. 




1, Menten, Mgr.; 2, Kistner; 3, Kelley; 4, Grow; 5, Scanlon; 6, 
Greer; 7, Hefner; 8, Falkenberg; 9, Speier; 10, Sheehan; 11, Quig- 
ley; 12, Jesion; 13, Mooney; 14, Bennett; 15, Dillon. Capt.: 16, 
Swift; 17, Kent. ST MARY'S (KAN.) COLLEGE. Strickrott, Photo. 




1, Shade; 2 4 Carnine; 3, Boltz; 4, Nicol, Coach; 5, Brown; 6, Sher- 
wood; 7, Meyers; 8, Driver; 9, Rice; 10, Tragesser; 11, Rosenbaum, 
Capt.; 12, Babcock; 13, Dalton; 14, M. Meyer, Umpire. 
PURDUE UNIVERSITY TEAM. 




1, St. John, Coach; 2, Post; 3, Avery; 4, Price, Mgr. ; 5, Griesenger; 
6, Richardson; 7, Shontz; 8, Tate; 9, Ervin; 10, Steele; 11, Comp- 
tton; 12, Emerson, Capt.; 13, Foss; 14, Atkinson; 15, Beach; 16, 
Frye; 17, Jacobs. 
I UNIVERSITY OF WOOSTER TEAM. 




OBERLIN (OHIO) COLLEGE TEAM. 





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I, Bellmont, Mgr. ; 2, Mayes, Asst. Mgr. ; 3, Carlen; 4, Loucks; 5, 
White; 6, Agee; 7, Leach; 8, Moffitt, Coach; 9, Morelock; 10, Eason; 

II, W. Baker; 12, F. Baker; 13, Kipp; 14, McNabb; 15, Ware; 16, 
Saxton; 17, Meek. 

UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE TEAM. 




1, Irving; 2, Simpson, Capt. ; 3, Ferguson; 4, Houston; 5, Jessup; 6, 
Maddock, Coach; 7, Herbst; 8, Gardner; 9, Jones; 10, Spitko. 

UNIVERSITY OF UTAH TEAM. Shipler, Photo. 




1, Heder; 2, Torgeson; 3, Sandlie; 4, O'Keefe; 5, Garvey; 6, Rod- 
gers, Mgr; 7, McHolland; 8, Comny; 9, Kyllo, Capt.; 10, Bradshaw; 
dl, Wenzel; 12, Jacobson. Lee Bros., Photo. 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH DAKOTA TEAM. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 365 

Extracts from Mr. A. G. Spalding's 
Address 

On the occasion of the presentation of the Spalding "Play Ball" Trophy 

to the winners of the Elementary Base Ball Championship 

of Greater New York, at Public School No. 9, 

Brooklyn, October 9, 1908. 

I congratulate the Principal of this school in being at the 
head of an institution that has made such marked advance in 
athletics during the first 3*ear of its introduction into the 
curriculum of this school. I congratulate the team in winning 
the Elementary School Base Ball Championship of Greater New- 
York for 1908. and I also congratulate the scholars of this 
school who aided in this result by their loyalty and enthusiasm. 

You went through the hard practice work that is so essen- 
tial to final success ; you played and won out in the prelimi- 
naries, in the semi-finals and in the final game. You have 
tasted the joys of victory ; you have had your celebration* 
on the field and in a few moments you will receive the emblem 
of victory, and then the games and the celebrations of 1908 
will become things of the past, but Public School No. 9 will 
continue to appear in the Base Ball records as the champions 
of 1908. 

Now let us consider some of the lessons that this Base Ball 
championship has taught. 

Your Principal has just related to me this incident with 
which I know you are all familiar. 

He said. that just previous to one of your final games your 
brilliant pitcher had flunked some of his studies and in conse- 
quence had received such a low scholarship mark that, accord- 
ing to the rules of the Public Schools Athletic League, made him 
ineligible to pitch for his team in this important game. No 
doubt the pitcher was chagrined, his team-mates discouraged, 
and the scholars of this school almost panic-stricken. I can 
imagine the pressure that was brought to bear on your Prin- 
cipal to- induce him to reverse his ruling and overlook thii 
pitcher's disqualifying scholarship mark. I can imagine the 
scholars of this school, almost with tears in their eyes, arguing 
for a reinstatement of this popular young pitcher, and no doubt 
your Principal was given plainly to understand that if he did 
not relent and change his ruling, the forthcoming game would 
be lost, and with it probably the championship. 

No doubt your Principal sympathized with you in your alarm 
about the loss of that game, and his emotions may have been 
strained by your tears, but he had a duty to perform ; he was 
acting in the capacity of a judge ; the pitcher had violated 
the eligibility rules, and his final decision was that your 
popular pitcher could not appear in that game, and as you all 
suspected, that particular game was lost by the team of this 
Bchool. 

No doubt a spirit of gloom settled over this school for the 
time being, and it is equally certain that a spirit of deter- 
mination took hold of your pitcher. He applied himself to hii 
studies and before the next and final game he acquired the 
necessary scholarship mark ; appeared in the pitcher's position 
in the final game, which was won by this school, and with It 
the Championship of Greater New York. 

















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"PLAY BALL," 
The A. G. Spalding Bronze Championship Trophy. 
The above group is executed in bronze, the figures being 18 inches 
high, and was presented to the Public Schools Athletic League of 
Greater New York by Mr. A. G. Spalding as a perpetual trophy for 
annual competition between the elementary schools of Greater New 
York, the winning school to have custody of the statuette for one 
year. In the first competition, held in 1905, 103 schools were 
entered, the winner being Public School 46, Manhattan. Public 
School 10, Brooklyn, won in 1906 and again in 1907; Public School 
No. 9 of Brooklyn won it in 1908- * 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 367 

Here is a splendid illustration of one of the many lesson* 
that are taught on the athletic field and shows the practical 
benefit of a League of this kind. 

Apply this and similar lessons which abound in athletic 
sports and you have gone a long way toward solving many 
of the more serious problems of life. This is a children's age 
and it is an athletic age, and if these two ages can in some 
way be welded together, humanity can look forward to better 
things, better manhood, better womanhood, and better citizen- 
ship. 

Your great-grandfathers knew nothing of athletic sport as it 
Is now understood. Your grandfathers got an inkling of its 
coming. Your fathers' youth was spent in a growing athletic 
atmosphere, but your generation is basking in the sunshine 
of athletic sport in its highest sense. The parent now en- 
courages his children in their natural love of athletic sports, 
and the advanced educators of the day now recognize the great 
importance of clean athletic sports, not only as a physical 
benefit, but a mental and moral benefit as well. 

There is born in every boy and girl an intense love of play, 
and as athletic sport is nothing more nor less than organized 
play, there is a natural and inborn love of athletics in it» 
various forms which nothing can extinguish. 

I consider the recently organized Public Schools Athletic 
League of Greater New York as the most remarkable athletic 
organization in the world, for I know of no institution that 
has higher athletic ideals and none other that has athletic 
jurisdiction over 300,000 school children. 

This Public School Athletic League — a pioneer in its par- 
ticular field — was organized in this city late in 1903, and 
commenced its activities in 1904. Its phenomenal success in 
directing the athletic activities of the public school children of 
Greater New York have caused similar organizations to spring 
up in other cities. The Public Schools Athletic League move- 
ment marks an epoch in American sports and is worthy of the 
most enthusiastic support, not only by parents, teachers and 
advanced educators, but more especially by the present genera- 
tion of boys and girls to whom it means so much. 



368 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL UASE BALL GUIDE. 

Public Schools Athletic League of 
Greater New York 

By Secretary C Ward Crampton, M.D. 

The Public Schools Athletic League of New York City con- 
ducted in 1907 the largest Base Ball tournament that has ever 
been held. One hundred and six teams entered, and during 
the season played their games, finally leaving Borough Cham- 
pions, which competed for the championship of the greater 
city. In 1908 practically the same number of schools took part 
and the season was carried through with great success. 

There was undoubtedly great enthusiasm in the city of New 
York over the deciding games of the 1908 National League 
championship, when Chicago and New York played the final 
series, but the enthusiasm of these twenty thousand schoolboys 
and teachers, with the representatives of every municipal 
department, from office boys to the Mayor, could not be more 
than equalled. During the whole season there was a notice- 
able lack of complaints received by the Secretary of the Public 
Schools Athletic League. This was due to the spirit of fair- 
ness which has come with the increase of interest, in athletic 
competition and the careful method of assigning umpires. It 
is sometimes said that school boys cannot play Base Ball, but 
when, in the deciding game between Public School 24, Man- 
hattan, and Public School 10, Brooklyn, which resulted in a 
victory for the Brooklyn school, only two runs and one error 
were made, it must be said that the New York boy can play 
tip-top Base Ball, and the kind of Base Ball that was played 
in the deciding' interborough championship kept many a school 
boy awake nights while the issue was in doubt. 

A. G. Spalding provided the Championship Trophy, which is 
perhaps the highest attainable schoolboy trophy of the city. 
The New Y^ork Herald gave a medal for the boy making the 
best batting record in the final series, a trophy to the school 
scoring the greatest number of runs, and the school having 
the least number of runs scored against it. Public School 24, 
Manhattan, won the latter two trophies and Dumas of Public 
School 9, Brooklyn, won the medal, / with an average of .529. 

The Public Schools Athletic League also holds the largest 
high school championship series. In 1908 nine teams were 
entered and the Spalding Trophy was won by the Commercial 
High School, with a score of eight games won and none lost 
The Herald Plaque, for scoring the greatest number of runs, 
went to the High School of Commerce, and the trophy for 
having the least number of runs scored against it was won by 
the Boys' High School : Carson, of the High School of Com- 
merce, won the Herald Medal for the best batting average, 
with a record of .580. 

When we consider that many of the schools in New York 
City are so situated that the pupils cannot take part in Base 
Ball except by going to the suburbs, the fact that one hundred 
and six teams were entered from a total of three hundred and 
forty-six schools which could possibly have entered a team, it 
is astonishing that such a record could be made. Base Ball, 
however, is the game which has a strong grip upon the 
American boy and the Public Schools Athletic League is work- 
ing to the end that every American boy in New Y/ork City will 
play the game and play it well. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 369 

The Chadwick Monument 

Every reader of the Guide will be more than glad to learn 
that all arrangements have been made in regard to the erection 
of a memorial over the grave of Henry Chadwick — the "Father 
of Base Ball" — in Greenwood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

When the matter was called to the attention of the owners 
of the National League at the December meeting they quickly 
proceeded to make such arrangements as were deemed most 
advisable. Among the contributors to the monument fund are 
Messrs. P. T. Powers, J. H. Farrell, A. G. Spalding, Harry 
Stevens, and other well-known Base Ball men. 

Through the efforts of the National League, in the future 
the grave will be surrounded with flowers and plants which 
belong to the season. In the summer, beds of pansies, roses, 
and like blossoms will be arranged by the florists, and in the 
winter there will be evergreens and holly on the cemetery plot. 

The monument, which will stand at the head of the grave, 
has been designed by Miss Florence S. Richter, daughter of Mr. 
Francis G. Richter, editor of Sporting Life. The contract has 
been let for its completion, and the contractor has promised 
that it shall be finished in time for unveiling on April 20, 1909, 
the first anniversary of "Father" Chadwick's death. 

It will not be too ornate, showy, or ostentatious, but a simple 
and solid affair, in keeping with the life of the man whose 
virtues it marks. The rules of the cemetery association prevent 
the expenditure of a large sum of money merely for show pur- 
poses, but the monument which has been provided is fully as 
rich as is permitted by the corporation. 

□ □ □ 

Annual Spring Meeting National 
League 

At the annual spring meeting of the National League, which 
began in Chicago, February 16, 1909, President Pulliam was 
extended an indefinite leave of absence to recover his health. 
In the meantime Mr. John A. Heydler, secretary-treasurer of 
the organization, was appointed to act as president pro tern., 
and to represent the League on the National Commission. 

The National League agreed to the changes in the National 
Agreement by which the clubs in Class AA are allotted a sep- 
arate classification. It was decided best to limit the number 
of players in the National League to twenty-five between May 
15 and August 20 and thirty-five during the remainder of the 
year. Within the same date limitations the Class AA clubs 
are to have sixteen players and twenty-five players. 

The home club in the National League in the future will 
name the date for a postponed game on the same afternoon 
on which a game is postponed. 

Ladies' days were abolished and so were the complimentary 
passes which the players had been . accustomed to give. The 
alleged attempt to bribe the umpires in the last Chicago-New 
York game of 1908 was referred to the National Commission. 

The American League also held its meeting at Chicago, on 
the same date, but beyond adopting the schedule the only mat- 
ter of importance which was transacted was the release of "Cy" 
Young by the Boston club to Cleveland. 



370 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

Base Ball in Australia 

Far away in *s T ew South Wales, that beautiful land of fertile 
fields and courteous men, a country which all Americans have 
learned to admire since the grand reception which was paid to 
the sailors of the American Navy, Base Ball has been more 
prosperous for the last year than at any time since its intro- 
duction into the Antipodes through the personal effort of Mr. 
A. G. Spalding. 

For it was Mr. Spalding's now justly celebrated tourist ball 
players who blazed the way for the great National Game of the 
United States in foreign lands. 

Once this sturdy American, who has done so much to stimu- 
late the growth of the great sport of Base Ball around the 
world, said that Base Ball "follows the flag." Never was there 
a truer statement. Base Ball followed the flag when the Spald- 
ing Tour Around the World was undertaken, as the American 
tourists were ever with their national colors, and the great game 
followed the flag a second time during the years 1908-09 when 
the battle ships of the American Navy steamed from Hampton 
Roads in Virginia to circumnavigate the globe. 

Wherever the American ships touched for any length of time 
there was Base Ball, just as on the famous Spalding trip of 
1888-89 there was Base Ball wherever there was a stopping 
place and a field on which a game could be played, and some 
of the most novel sites were selected for temporary Base Ball 
diamonds that ever befell the national sport of any country. 

The American people can justly rival the British in the wide- 
spread area over which their national pastime is conducted. It 
is the proud boast of Great Britain that there is cricket wherever 
a Union Jack floats, and it is as true of the United States that 
there is Base Ball wherever the Stars and Stripes toss in the 
breeze. 

From Sydney, New South Wales, Mr. Leonard I. Lillyman, 
Honorary Secretary of the New South Wales Base Ball Asso- 
ciation, writes most entertainingly of the fine progress which the 
American game has made in the season which is now at an end 
because of the inclement weather, and also of the visit of the 
American naval fleet to the far-away land. Mr. Lillyman says: 

"Twenty teams play regularly in Sydney in Base Ball and 
there are a like number in Melbourne. These are under the 
control of the New South Wales Association and the Victorian 
League, respectively. 

"Last season we introduced the game in South Australia 
and Tasmania, and efforts have been made to introduce it into 
Western Australia, and I have not a doubt that they will be as 
successful as other efforts have been to popularize the American 
sport. 

"For the benefit of those in the United States, who take an 
interest in what we do, I would like to say that we play the 
game here for the pure love of it. Professionalism is entirely 
absent, and would be stamped out as soon as it made its appear- 
ance. Those who take part are generally devotees of cricket, 
which is played in the summer months, and consequently we are 
compelled to play ball in the winter, which accounts for a good 
number of lame arms among our pitching brigade. We only 
play once a week and on holidays, and if we do get but little 
encouragement we know that we are progressing all the time. 

"The standard of Base Ball in Australia is steadily improv- 
ing each season, and the visit of the United States fleet to our 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 371 

shores gave our players a much-needed practical lesson in the 
finer points. Up to last season we had been self-taught — taught 
by studying the rules as they are laid down in Spalding's Guide. 
with the assistance of a casual visitor from the United States, 
who would be willing to impart any knowledge of which he 
was possessed. It was all eagerly devoured by our players, 
who were only too glad to obtain it and in turn they imparted 
it to their comrades. 

"I am told that the quality of Base Ball which is played in 
Australia at present is quite up to the standard of amateur 
Base Ball in the United States. 

"The pitchers of the ships of the United States fleet were 
too much for our batters, but I fancy that it would not have 
been very long before we would have been able to hit them all 
over the diamond. The speed with which they threw the ball 
was something new to us, and we are ready to admit that we 
know very little of the art of throwing. We are going to learn 
to attain pace, and I hope to be able to tell your American 
readers that in a few years we possess a 'Mathewson' among us. 

"When the fleet landed its sailors for games with our clubs 
we were all delighted. It seemed like putting an American 
league of Base Ball clubs among us to instruct us in the game 
which we had played with so much enjoyment. 

"The teams of the fleet played four contests in Sydney. Two 
were against New South Wales and two against All-Australia. 
In three of these contests the Americans won. They lost the 
second game to the All-Australia nine, but it was a well-played 
contest and the enthusiasm and applause which resulted while 
it was going on well repaid us for our efforts in behalf of Base 
Ball and certainly gave pleasure to the American visitors who 
took part in the games against our boys. 

"The field work of the American players was slightly better 
than ours. They seemed to know better how to handle them- 
selves to look after certain plays, and of course that was to be 
expected in view of the long training which they had as com- 
pared with the teaching that had been given our boys in the 
effort to bring up the game to a proper standard in Australia. 

"We could not help but observe the work of their pitchers 
with admiration, because it gave us an inkling of what pitching 
was like in the United States and was totally different from our 
conception of delivering the ball to the batter. McCreary, 
Scott and other pitchers of the American fleet, who were put 
in the box against us, were batted very little because of the 
pace with which they delivered the ball. On the other hand, 
the batters from the fleet did not prove to be so wonderfully 
effective against our pitchers. 

"I desire to inform the ball players of the United States of 
the excellent sportsmen whom we met in the fleet players. All 
the games were most enjoyable, and right through the series we 
found our opponents grand fellows, and just as splendid sports- 
men as were Lieut. Weaver, U.S.S. 'Connecticut,' and Mid- 
shipman Cohen, U.S.S. 'Kansas,' who had charge of the teams 
representing the fleet. To both of these gentlemen we are 
greatly indebted for much information and for the assistance 
given to rnrther the game of Base Ball in New South Wales." 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



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30; May 1, 2; June 
22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27 
Sept. 28, 29, 30 
October 1, 2, 3 


June 29, 30 
July 1, 2, 3. 4, 5, 5 

August 
10. 11. 12, 13, 14, 15 


May 17, 18, 19, 20 

21, 22, 23 

August 
17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22 


May 3, 4, 5,6, 7,8,9 
24, 25, 26, 27. 28, 29 
30, 31, 31; Aug. 31 
Sept. 1,2,3,4,5, 6,6 
21, 22, 23. 24. 25, 26 


T3 

1 

1 




July 

6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 

September 

14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 


May 10, 11, 12, 13 

14, 15. 16. July 13 

14, 15, 16, 17. 18 

August 

24, 25, 2(5, 27. 28, 29 


May 24, 25, 26, 27 

28, 29, 30, 31, 31 

August 31 

September 

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 6 


June 
22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27 

September 
7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 


May 17, 18, 19, 20 
21, 22, 23; June 
29, 30; July 1, 2, 3 
4, 5, 5; August 
17. 18. 19. 20, 21, 22 


Clubs 


1 




•4- 

a 




Tacoma 


Spokane 


u 

> 

3 
O 

o 

§ 

> 


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SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



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SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

Spalding's Official Base Ball Record 

The contents of the 1909 Record comprise in part the complete 
official averages of the major and minor leagues for 1908, with standing 
of clubs and list of previous winners in each organization since its 
inauguration; a most interesting account of the past year in base ball, 
presented in chronological order; long professional games of 1908; 
charts showing the race in the National and American leagues, pre- 
senting in a page a graphic illustration of the fluctuations of the teams 
as they advanced or receded from the coveted first position; list of 
batsmen who have made .400 since 1871; batsmen who have batted .300 
in any major league since 1876, etc., etc. The illustrations are an important 
feature of the book and comprise groups of all the champion teams in 
the major and minor leagues, world's series scenes, and action pictures 
of rising young players who have reached the goal of every player — 
the "big leagues." 

To enumerate the complete list of contents would only give a faint 
idea of the wealth of information contained in the Record. Every one 
of the following queries can be answered from this year's issue :— 
Who holds the long distance throw- What teams have won the New 



ing record? 

Who hold the record for greatest 
number of chances accepted in 
their respective fielding posi- 
tions? 

Who had the greatest number of 
times at bat in one season ? 

Who made the greatest number of 
singles in one season ? 

Who holds the record for the great- 
est number of home runs in one 
season ? 

Who was the leading batter in 1879 ? 

Who was the leading pitcher of 
the National League in the first 
year of its existence ? 

Who was president of the Chicago 
club in 1876? 

Who was first president of the 
National League ? 

Who has led the National League 
first basemen in that position the 
greatest number of times? 

Who won the National League bat- 
ting championship the greatest 
number of times ? 

Who played in the greatest num- 
ber of games in the National 
League in 1908? 

Who has the best percentage for 
second base playing in the major 
leagues ? 

Who holds the record for circling 
the bases ? 

Who is the holder of the record for 
playing in the greatest number 
of games in one season ? 

Who holds the record for succes- 
sive pitching victories? 

Who holds the record for pitching 
most consecutive games? 



England League championship 
four times? 

What team has won the American 
League championship the great- 
est number of times ? 

When did Montreal win the Eastern 
League championship? 

What team has been a successive 
three-time winner of the Amer- 
ican Association pennant ? 

What are the only cases on record 
of a team playing three games in 
one day and winning all ? 

What minor league pitcher has the 
remarkable consecutive record of 
twenty games won, two ties, and 
not one lost ? 

What is the shortest professional 
game on record ? 

What was the greatest number of 
victories in a major league play- 
ing season ? 

What pitchers have had no-hit 
games to their credit in the 
major leagues since 1880? 

What team won the Blue Grass 
League championship in 1908? 

What teams of the same name won 
pennants in different leagues in 
1908 ? 

What team in a big minor league 
won more games than the pen- 
nant winner ? 

What player made his 2,000th base- 
hit in 1908 since his connection 
with the National League ? 

What National League teams kept 
in the first division exclusively 
throughout the season of 1908 ? 

What year was overhand pitching 
first authorized ? 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



Who holds the record for striking 
out the most batsmen ? 

Who holds the record for the great- 
est number of games pitched in 
a season? 

Who holds the record for the great- 
est number of strikeouts in a 
season ? 

Who comprise the list of ".400" 
hitters since 1871 ? 

Who played on the Detroit team 
when they won the National 
League Championship in 1887? 

Who are the players with a record 
of more than three home runs in 
a single game ? 



What pitcher has a record of five 
double-header victories in a 
season ? 

What American League teams 
occupied every position in the 
pennant race of 1908 at some 
time during the season after the 
first two weeks' playing? 

What pennant winning team in 
organized base ball in 1908 had 
the most victories? 

What teams were charter members 
of the National League ? 

What teams have been continuous 
members of the National League 
since its organization ? 



Spalding's Official Base Ball Record is for sale by all newsdealers, or 
can be obtained by mail for 10 cents from any of A. G. Spalding & Bros.' 
stores, a list of which is given on inside front cover of this book. 

j3 F»r i9o 9 ATHLETIC ALlf lilnliil/ 



Edited by J. E. Sullivan, President of 
the Amateur Athletic Union. The only 
publication containing a list of the best- 
on-record for running, walking, jumping, 
weight throwing, swimming, with name 
of record holder and date of performance; 
all the results of the past season in ath- 
letics; foreign records, and a complete 
account of the Olympic Games of 1908, 
with list of previous Olympic winners. 
The Almanac is the official authority on 
all amateur athletic records and every ath- 
lete and follower of athletics should have 
a copy to keep up to date. Price 10 cents, 
For sale by all newsdealers and at 
A. G. SPALDING & BROS/ stores 
(see list on inside front cover of this book) . 



Profusely 
illustrated 
Scenes at the 

OLYMPIC 
GAMES 

Sheppard 

Sheridan 

Daniels 

Hayes 

Dorando 

and all of the 

Olympic Athletes 



ARATH0N RUNNING 



Spalding's 
Athletic 
Library 
Every athlete who aspires to become a Marathon 
runner should have a copy of this book. M.C. Murphy 
tells how he trained the American Olympic Marathon 
team at London and the balance of the contents con- 
tains full directions for training; numerous pictures 
of leading runners in action, including Longboat, 
Shrubb, Hayes, Dorando, Maloney, Crowley, and 
others. Edited by J. E. Sullivan. Price 10 cents. For sale by all news- 
dealers and A.G.SPALDING & BROS, (see list stores on inside front cover) . 




SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

The Spalding Official National League Ball 

"THE BALL PLAYED ROUND THE WORLD" 




BARRY C. PULLIAM. 
President of National League since 1903. 



The Spalding Official National League 
Ball is the Original League Ball, it is the 
Universally Adopted League Ball, it is the 
Best League Ball. 

There are in the United States 41 Pro- 
fessional Base Ball Leagues under the 
control of the National Commission and 
playing in accordance with the National 
Agreement and according to the Official 
Rules. Of these 41 Leagues 28 have 
adopted the Spalding Official National 
League Ball. With most of them the 
adoption has been in effect since the 
organization of the leagues themselves, 
while others have adopted the Spalding 
Ball for periods of from 4 to 20 years, and 
recently organized leagues from 1 to 4 
years. A complete roster of all the Pro- 
fessional Leagues that have adopted the 
Spalding Official National League Ball 
during the past thirty-two years would 
make a list embracing the vast majority of all leagues organized during 
that time and would be impossible to compile, as many leagues "^opt 
the Spalding Ball and fail to advise us of the fact. 

The Spalding Official National League Ball was first adopted by the 
National League in 1878, and is the only ball that has been used in 
Championship League Games since that time. In addition to the dif- 
ferent American adoptions, the Spalding Official National League Ball 
has been made the official ball by the governing Base Ball Associations 
of Mexico, Cuba, Canada, Australia, South Africa, Great Britain, Philip- 
pine Islands, Japan, and, in fact, wherever Base Ball is played. The 
Spalding Official National League Ball has received this universal adop- 
tion because of its well established reputation for uniformity and high 
quality, but the special object of such adop- 
tions, from the players' stand-point, is to 
secure absolute uniformity in a ball, that 
will prevent unfair "jockeying" with an 
unknown ball, and make National and 
International Base Ball contests possible, 
and at the same time make the records of 
players of value, and uniform throughout 
the world, which can only be secured by 
standardizing one well known ball. 

The Spalding Official National League 
Ball is used by Yale, Harvard, Princeton 
and all prominent college teams, and^ by 
the soldiers and sailors in the United 
States Army and Navy. In fact, the 
Spalding Official National League Ball is 
in universal use wherever Base Ball is 
played. Once in a while a minor league 
will experiment for a short time with 
some other ball, but invariably returns 
to the Spalding Official National League 
Ball, which has now become ^universally 
recognized the Standard of the World. 






er ncc o»tw mcsidcmt 



June 1st, 1908. 
1 hereby certify that 
Spalding' a Offlolal National 
League Ball has teen the 
adopted and only offlolal ball 
of the National League sinoe 
1878. This ball oust be used 
in all Championship Games. 

fres't National League. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



Base Ball Implements for 1909 

The Spalding 1 complete line of Base Balls for 1909 comprises fourteen dif- 
ferent kinds; the leader, of course, being the Spalding Official National League 
Ball, which has been the official ball of the game since 1878. It has been 
termed "the ball played round the world," because of its universal use 
wherever the game is played— and it is now world-wide in extent. 

In bats the leader is the Gold Medal Autograph Bat, so-called because 
Spalding has secured permission from many of the leading batters of both the 
National and American Leagues to duplicate the models used by them and 
stamp the fac-simile of the players' signatures on each bat. Some of the 
models so stamped are the "Frank L. Chance Autograph" Bat; the "George 
R. Stone Autograph;" the "M. J. Donlin Autograph;" the '"Roger P. Bres- 
nahan Autograph;" the "John J. Evers Autograph" and the "Wm. H. Keeler 
Autograph." However, with all the models made by Spalding, there are many- 
players who have their own ideas of a bat, or who wish to incorporate the vari- 
ous points of several players' bats. To accommodate such batters Spalding 
will make to order any kind of a bat, from description furnished, accompanied 
by the measurements of length, weight, etc. These bats cost only $1.00 each, 
same as the "Players' Autograph." but require several weeks' time. The 
other bats listed by Spalding comprise the "Black Diamond," new this year, 
at $1.00; the "Record," 75 cents; the latter is put up in dozen lots, assorted 
as to weight and length, and especially recommended for club, school and col- 
lege use (boys' Record bats, assorted, cost 50 cents each) ; the Mushroom bat, 
with the patent knob arrangement at handle, 50 cents, and the old "Spalding 
Trade-Mark" line, which is kept up to date with latest models, at 50, 35 and 25 
cents each (boys' 25 and 10 cents each). 

The line of catchers' mitts, basemen's mitts, fielders' mitts and infielders' 
gloves is bewildering in quantity. Any player, however particular, cannot 
fail to be suited both in quality and price. 

In the uniform line it would be practically impossible for any one else to 
equal Spalding uniforms in variety of patterns and combinations. Base ball 
uniforms require great strength in the material, on account of the excessively 
rough usage to which they are subjected, and which cannot be found in — or 
expected from — the ordinary lines of cloths. These goods are made up for 
Spalding exclusively, for this one purpose, and tailored by men who are base 
ball tailors, a matter which requires as much expertness in cutting and fit- 
ting as a high class custom made suit of clothes . If "clothes make the man," 
then a good uniform helps to make a ball player, because no player can do 
himself justice in an ill-fitting, slovenly-cut suit. 

The matter of shoes for a player is probably the post important part of 
his equipment. A shoe that does not fit, that is not "just right," is a serious 
handicap. That is where the superiority of the Spalding shoe is exemplified. 
It is made by shoemakers who make only athletic shoes, and their experi- 
ence enables them to give every detail to a shoe that a player requires. 
Most of the prominent players have their shoes made to order by Spalding, 
who keeps a last for each player, .and the individual peculiarity and require- 
ments of hundreds of players centering in one factory, make it a great clear- 
ing house of ideas, which no ordinary shoemaker or manufacturer can ever 
possibly obtain. 

Space only permits us to touch in a general way on the more important 
parts of the equipment of a ball team. A complete description of every- 
thing required for base ball, and every other athletic sport, including pic- 
tures and prices of the goods, requires a 144-page catalogue, which can be 
obtained from any Spalding store (see list of houses on inside front cover- 
writing to .the nearest one will save time) by sending a request on a postal; 
or, if interested only in base ball, ask for the special base ball catalogue, a 
handsome, illustrated 48-page publication. Either catalogue will be mailed 
free anywhere. 



THE SPALDING 

GUARANTEES :l 
f> QUALITY 



^TRADE-MARK ii 

lb I ACCEPT NO 
7 SUBSTITUTE^ 



1909 



*3fe£L H fc 




'/Sfeu&ie Sean/^h^L^ Official 

m^fuc&ajl t '?*»™* rr \t.JZeagueSr. 

'^^^^U Official IP 
^yfytiGnaljCea^uem 




eaaue% 






'S Jiavor/te\ 




London 
England 



Communications addressed to 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

in any of the following cities will receive attention 
For street numbers see inside front cover of this book 



Edinburgh 
Scotland 



New York 
Buffalo 
Syracuse 



Boston 
Pittsburg 
Cleveland 



Philadelphia 
Washington 
Baltimore 



Chicago 
Detroit 
Atlanta 



St. Louis 
Denver 
Seattle 



Cincinnati 
Kansas City 
Minneapolis 



San Francisco 
New Orleans 
Montreal, Can. 



Prices in effect January 5, 1909. Subject to change without notice. 



THE SPALDING 

GUARANTEES 
^ QUALITY 



(TRADE-MARK 

) ACCEPT NO 

SUBSTITUTE ^ 



■to. «. s . «i. »tw 1 

SPALDING OFFICIAL NATIONAL LEAGUE BALL 

The Official Ball of the game for over 30 years. 
Adopted by the National League in 1878 and 
the only ball used in championship games since 
that time. No. 1. Each, $1.25 Per dozen, $15.00 

SPALDING OFFICIAL NATIONAL LEAGUE JUNIOR 

In every respect same as our Official National League 
Ball No. 1, except slightly smaller in size. Especially 
designed for junior clubs (composed of boys under 16 
years of age) and all games in which this ball is used 
will be recognized as legal games. No. Bl. Each, $1.00 

Spalding National Association Ball 

No. NA. Made in exact accordance 
with the rules governing the 
National and American Leagues 
and all clubs under the National 
Agreement. Ea.,$1.00.Doz.,$12.00 

Spalding National Association Jr. 

No. B2. In every respect same as 
our National Association Ball 
No. NA, except slightly smaller 
in size Each, 75c. 

Spalding Public School League 

No. B3. A well made junior size 
ball. Splendid for general prac- 
tice by boys' teams. Each, 50c. 

Spalding King of the Diamond 

No. 5. Full size, of good materia], 
horsehide cover. , . Each, 25c, 

Spalding Junior Professional 

No. 7B. Slightly under regular 
size, horsehide cover and very 
lively Each, 25c. 

Spalding Boys' Amateur Ball 

No. 11. Nearly regulation size and 
weight, the best ball for the 
money on the market; one dozen 
balls in a box. . . . Each, 10c. 



Spalding Double Seam League Ball 

No. 0. Made with same care and 
of same material as our Official 
National League Ball. The double 
seam is used in its construction, 
rendering it doubly secure against 
ripping. Each, $1.50 Doz., $18.00 

Spalding City League 

No.L4. Full size and weight. Very 
well made and excellent ior gen- 
eral practice. Ea., 75c. Doz., $9.00 

Spalding Professional 

No. 2. Full size ball. Made of care- 
fully selected material and first- 
class quality. . . . Each, 50c. 

Spalding Lively Bounder 

No. 10. Horsehide cover; the inside 
is all rubber, making it the live- 
liest ball ever offered at the 
price Each, 25c. 

Spalding Boys' Favorite 

No. 12. A good boys' lively ball; 
two-piece cover. Packed one 
dozen balls in a box. Each, 10c. 

Spalding Rocket Ball 

No. 13. A good bounding ball; 
boys' size. One dozen balls in a 
box. Each, 5c. 



London 
England 



Communications addressed to 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

in any of the following cities will receive attention 
For street numbers see inside front cover of this book 



Edinburgh 
Scotland 



New York 
Buffalo 
Syracuse 



Boston 
Pittsburg 
Cleveland 



Philadelphia 
Washington 
Baltimore 



Chicago 
Detroit 
Atlanta 



St. Louis 
Denver 
Seattle 



Cincinnati 
Kansas City 
Minneapolis 



San Francisco 
New Orleans 
Montreal.Can. 



Prices in effect January 5. 1909. Subject to change without notice. 



THE SPALDING^^TRADE-MARK 

GUARANTEES |iP&SSbl ACCEPT NO 
— QUALITY ^^^ SUBSTITUTE yj 



GOLD MEDAL AUTOGRAPH BATS 

In order to satisfy the demand for bats of the same models as used by 
leading players, we have obtained permission from many of the leading 
batters of the country to include in our line of high-grade bats these 
Gold Medal " Autograph " Bats, bearing their signature. 

Space will not- permit a description of all the various models, but the 
following have been selected as examples of what we are producing 
in this special "Players' Autograph" Bat Departments 
No. 100. Plain oil finish. • Each, $1.00 



Autograph Model 



This is a very large Bat 
with a fairly thick handle. 
Bats supplied will not weigh 
less than 43 nor over 48 
:e& Length about 35 




Autograph Model 



This Bat is somewhat 
shorter than the Chance 
model, medium thick handle 
and rounded end. Bats 
supplied will not weigh less 
than 41 nor over 43 ounces, 
length about %V,i inches, 






Co **»=■ 



AutQgr§fib Model 



A symmetrically shaped Bat 
of good bulk and medium 
thick handle. Bats supplied 
will not weigh less than 41 
nor more than 45 ounces, 
length about ZVA inches. 



// Autograph Model 

This is also a large Bat, 
about an inch shorter than 
the Giance Model, but with 
(more bulk throughout and 
a somewhat heavier handle. 
Bats will not weigh less 
than 46 nor over 50 ounces, 
length about 34 inches. 

* . * * ' Autograph ModeB 
This model and the Chance 
Bat touch the two extremes 
in models and weights used 
by the great majority of 
prominent professional 
players. The Keeler Model 
is short and has fairly thin 
handle. Bats supplied will 
not weigh less than 36 nor. 
over 39 ounces. Length about 31 inches.. 





Chance 
Model 



This is a large Bat, the 
same length as the Chance 
model, but somewhat dif- 
ferent shape and not quite as 
thick handle. Bats will not 
weigh less than 43 nor over 
46 ounces. Length 35 inche J. 

CORRESPONDENCE— If you wish any particular 
model bat and will describe same, in addition to giving 
length and weight, we will endeavor to fulfil your speci- 
fications. As these bats are made to order only, at least 
two weeks time may be required. . • Each $ 1 .00 




Donlin 
Model 



London 
England 



Communications addressed to 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

in any of the following cities will receive attention 
For street numbers see inside front cover of this book 



Edinburgh 
Scotland 



New York 
Buffalo 
Syracuse 



Boston 
Pittsburg 
Cleveland 



Philadelphia 
Washington 
Baltimore 



Chicago 
Detroit 
Atlanta 



St. Louis 
Denver 
Seattle 



Cincinnati 
Kansas City 
Minneapolis 



San Francisco 
New Orleans 

Montreal, Cat. 



- JPxices in eff ect J anuary 5, 1909. Subject Jo change without notice.. 



THE SPALDINGfcgkTRADE-MARK 

GUARANTEES te|| ACCEPT NO 
"^ QUALITY ^r^ SUBSTITUTE «r> 



•co.u.b. pat. »rr. 



SPALDING "BLACK DIAMOND 

No. 100D. Same quality as our ^ 



BAT 



I SI 



No. 100D No. 75 



Gold Medal Autograph Bats, 
in the most popular models. 
The special finish used is a 
similar preparation to that 
which professional players 
rub on their bats. Ea., $1.00 
Spalding Record Bat 
Plain oil finish. Made from the 
most popular models, but fin- 
ished in rough and ready style, 
with no polish — simply the plain 
oil finish. Especially recom- 
mended for club use, including 
college and school teams. 
Packed one dozen in a crate 
(assorted lengths from 30 to 35 
inches and weights from 36 to 
42 ounces) , as nearly as possible 
in the following proportion : 

LEXGTHS "WEIGHTS 

l-30in, 2-33in. I l-36oz. 2-39oz. 
l-31in. 4-34in. I l-3Toz. 4-40, 41oz. 
2-32in. 2-35in. " 2-38oz. 2-41, 42oz. 
These lengths and weights are 
given approximately and as a 
rule the shortest lengths will be 

the lightest weights. 
No. 75. Plain oil finish. Ea.,75c 

Spalding Boys' Record Bat 
No. 50B. Same as the Record, 
but shorter lengths and pro- 
portionate weights. An ab- 
solutely first grade bovs' 
bat. . . . Each, 50c. 
Spalding Mushroom Bat 
[Pat. Aug. 1,1905] The Knob 
Arrangement provides a more 
even distribution of weight over 
the whole length than is possi- 
ble under the old construction, 
making it for certain kinds of 
play practically invaluable. Only 
very best air-dried timber used 
and every one carefully tested. 
No. 50M. Plain Bat, Special 
Finish. . . Each, 50c 



No. 50B No. 50M 



IS 



^Communications addressed to 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

in any of the following cities will receive attention 
For street numbers see inside front cover of this book 



London 
England 



Edinburgh 
Scotland 



New York 

Buffalo 

Syracuse 



Boston 
Pittsberg 
Cleveland 



Philadelphia 
Washington 
Baltimore 



Chicago 
Detroit 
Atlanta 



St. Louis 
Denver 
Seattle 



Cincinnati 
Kansas City 

Minneapolis 



San Francisco 
New Orleans 

Montreal, Can. 



Prices in effect January 5, 1909. Subject to change without notice. 



THE SPALDING 

GUARANTEES 
•> QUALITY 



»ATR AD E- M ARK 

PS?y ACCEPT NO 

q SUBSTITUTE ^\ 



*IOU.«»»T.»Ff." 




SPALDING TRADE-MARK BATS 

Since 1877, when we introduced the Spalding 
line of Trade-Mark Bats, they have been 
recognized as standard by players to whom 
quality is a consideration. Wherever pos- 
sible, we have improved both style and qual- 
ity from time to time and the assortment as now 
made up comprises absolutely the most up-to- 
date and thoroughly trustworthy styles thatcan 
be produced. The tim- 
ber used in their con- 
struction is seasoned in 
open sheds, exposed to 
the weather from two 
to three years before 
using, thus ensuring 
not only a lighter and 
stronger bat, but also re- 
tain ing the life quality 
and driving power 
of the natural wood. 

Spalding Men's Bats 
No. 50T. Taped 

"League" Ash Bat, 

tape wound handle, 

extra quality, special 

finish. f( . Each, 50c. 
No. 50. "League" Ash 

Bat, plain handle. 50c. 
No. 35T. Taped "City 

League" Bat, finest 

straight grained ash; 

tape wound handle, 

Each, 35c. 

No. 25. "City League" 

Bat, plain handle. 25c. 

SpaMing 4 Boys' Bats 

No. 25B. "Junior 

League" Bat, plain; 

extra quality ash, 

spotted burning. 25c. 
No. 25BT. Taped 

' 'Junior League ' ' B at, 

tape wound handle, 

special finish. 25c. 
No.lOB."Boys'League" 

Bat, good quality ash, 

varnished. Each, 10c. No. 25B N0.25BT No.iob 



No.35T No. 25 



London 
England 



Communications addressed to 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

in any of the following cities will receive attention 

For street numbers see inside front cover of this book 



Edinburgh 
Scotland 



New York 
Buffalo 
Syracuse 



Boston 
Pittsburg 
Cleveland 



Philadelphia 
Washington 
Baltimore 



Chicago 
Detroit 

At santa 



St. Louis 
Denver 
Seattle 



Cincinnati 
Kansas City 
Minneapolis 



San Francisco 
New Orleans 
Montreal, Can. 



Prices in effect January 5, 1909, Subject to change without notice. 



THE SPALDING, 

GUARANTEES I 
^ QUALITY 




TRADE-MARK 

) ACCEPT NO 

SUBSTITUTE y y 



Spalding Base Ball Catchers' Mitts 
Spalding "Three and Out" 

(Pat. Jan. 2, 1906) 
No. 9-0. Molded Face. A master- 
piece of care and attention. Only- 
leather perfectly tanned is used; 
best hair felt padding; no seams 
or rough places. . Each, $8.00 
Spalding "Professional" 
No. 8-0. Face of white buck, special- 
ly selected and best quality. Made 
in accordance with ideas of the 
best professional catchers. $7.00 
Spalding "International" 
No. 7-0R. Superior quality black 
calf skin,best padding. Each,$6.00 
Spalding 'Terfection" 
No. 7-0. Best quality brown calfskin 
throughout. . . . Each, $6.00 
Spalding "Collegiate" 
(Pat. Jan. 2, 1906) 
No. 6-0. Molded face. Special olive 
colored leather, perfectly tanned 
to enable us to produce the neces- 
sary " pocket' ' with a smooth 
surface, felt padding, strap-and- 
buckle fastening at back, patent 
lace back, no heel pad. Each, $5.00 
Spalding "League Extra" 
No. 5-0. Special drab tanned buck, 
very soft and pliable. Each, $5.00 
Spalding 'Xeague Special" 
No. 4-0. Face of special gray tanned 

buck Each, $4.00 

Spalding "Decker Patent" 
No. OX. Face of velvet tanned 
brown leather, heavy piece of sole 
leather on back for protection to 

fingers Each, $3.50 

No. 3-0. Good quality black calf- 
skin; heavy piece of sole leather 
on back for extra protection to 
fingers Each, $3.50 

All Styles made in Rights and Lefts 






London 
England 



Communications addressed to 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

in any of the following cities will receive attention 
For street numbers see inside front cover of this book 



Edinburgh 
Scotland 



New York 

Boffalo 

Syracuse 



Boston 
Pittsburg 
Cleveland 



Philadelphia 
Washington 
Baltimore 



Chicago 
Detroit 
Atlanta 



St. Louis 
Denver 
Seattle 



Cincinnati 
Kansas City 
Minneapolis 



San Francisco 
New Orleans 
Montreal, Can. 



Prices in effect January 5, 1909. Subject to change without notice^ 



THE SPALDING 

GUARANTEES 
— QUALITY 



^TRADE-MARK 

I ACCEPT NO 

SUBSTITUTE ^v 



SPALDING 'INTERSTATE" CATCHERS' MITT 

No. 0. Prof. Model, face velvet tanned brown leather, 
back selected buck, patent lace back. Each, $3.00 
SPALDING 'DECKER PATENT" CATCHERS' MITT 
No. CR. Black leather, heavy sole leather finger pro- 
tector on back, patent lace back. . Each, $2.50 
SPALDING "INTER-CITY" CATCHERS' MITT 
No. OA. Brown velvet tanned leather, patent lace 
back, reinforced and laced at thumb. Each, $2.50 
SPALDING "SEMI-PRO" CATCHERS' MITT 
No. 1R. Black leather, patent lace back. Each, $2.00 

SPALDING "BACK-STOP" CATCHERS' MITT 
No. 1C. Good quality special tanned buff colored lea- 
ther face, patent lace back. . . Each, $t.50 
SPALDING "CHAMPION" CATCHERS' MITT 
No. ID. Black face, with special buff leather reinforce- 
ment on palm, no heel pad, laced at thumb. Ea„ $1.25 
SPALDING "ASSOCIATION" MITT 
No. 2R. Black leather face, back and fing-er-piece, 
strap-and-buckle fastening at back. Each, $1.00 

SPALDING "CLUB" MITT 
No. 2A. Extra quality white buck face, back and finger- 
piece, well padded, no heel pad. . Each, $1.00 
SPALDING "YOUTHS' LEAGUE" MITT 
No. 2B. Full size. Pearl colored special smooth tan- 
ned leather face, no heel pad, correctly padded, strap- 
and-buckle fastening at back. . . Each, $1.00 
SPALDING "INTERSCHOLASTIC" MITT 
No. 3R. Large size, good quality black leather. Ea. 7%:. 

SPALDING "PUBLIC SCHOOL" MITT 

No. 4. Large size, improved style, face and back of 

special tanned buck, extra heavily padded. Each, 50c. 

SPALDING "BOYS' AMATEUR" MITT 

No. 4R. A very well made junior size mitt, black leather 

face and back and white side strip. . Each, 50c, 

SPALDING "BOYS' DELIGHT" MITT 

No. 5. Improved style, face and back made of special 

tanned buck, well padded. . . . Each, 25c. 

ALL STYLES MADE IX SIGHTS ASD LEFTS 

For complete descriptions and illustrations of Mitts, 
see Spalding's Base Ball Catalogue. Mailed Free. 



London 
England 



Communications addressed to 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

in any of the following cities will receive attention 
For street numbers see inside front cover of this book 



Edinburgh 
Scotland 



New York 

Buffalo 
Syracuse 



Boston 
Pittsburg 
Cleveland 



Philadelphia 
Washington 
Baltimore 



Chicago 
Detroit 
Atlanta 



St. Louis 
Denver 
Seattle 



Cincinnati 
Kansas City 
Minneapolis 



San Francisco 
New Orleans 
Montreal, Can. 



Prices in effect January 5, 1909. Subject to change without notice. 



THE SPALDING, 

GUARANTEES | 

r^ QUALITY 



lE^TRADE-MARK 

IteSibl ACCEPT NO 
££*F SUBSTITUTE ^\ 



SPALDING BASEMEN'S MITTS 





Spalding "League Special" No. AX Basemen's Mift 

No. AX. Special professional model. Finest quality 
white tanned buckskin face, back and lining-; lacing 
all around and at thumb. . . . Each, $4.00 
Spalding "League Special" No. BX Basemen's Mitt 
No. BX. Fine selected and specially tanned brown calf- 
skin face, back and lining-; lacing all around. $4.00 
Spalding "League Special" No. BXR Basemen's Mitt 
No. BXR. Specially selected finest quality black calf- 
skin face, back and lining; lacing all around. $4.00 
Spalding "League Special" No. BXS Basemen's Mitt 
No. BXS. Special professional model. Finest selected 
brown calfskin face, back and lining; lacing all 

around and at thumb Each, $4.00 

Spalding "Professional" Basemen's Mitt 
No. CO. Very durable olive calfskin face, back and 
lining. Padded and laced all around. Each, $3.00 
Spalding "Semi-Pro" Basenren's Mitt 
No. CX. Face of specially tanned slate-color leather; 
back of. firm tanned brown leather; extra well pad- 
ded. Strap -and-buckle fastening. . Each, $2.50 
Spalding "Amateur" Basemen's Mitt (Black) 
No. CXR. Black calfskin face, black leather back and 
lining. "Well padded, no hump. r . . Each, $2.00 
Spalding "Amateur" Basemen's lilitt 
No. CXS. Brown buck leather face, brown tanned lea- 
ther back and lining. Well padded, no hump. $2.00 
Spalding "Double Play" Basemen's Mitt 
No.DX. Men's size. Black tanned specially selected 
leather, laced all around. Very easy fitting. $ 1 .50 
Spalding "League Jr." Basemen's Mitt 
No. EX. Good quality black leather, laced all around. 
Suitably padded. Will give good service. Each, $1.00 

ALIi STYLES MADE IIS" EIGHTS AlOD LEFTS 




London 
England 



Communications addressed to 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

in any of the following cities will receive attention 
For street numbers see inside front cover of this book 



Edinburgh 
Scotland 



New York 
Buffalo 
Syracuse 



Boston 
Pittsborg 
Cleveland 



Philadelphia 
Washington 
Baltimore 



Chicago 
Detroit 
Atlanta 



St. Louis 
Denver 
Seattle 



Cincinnati 
Kansas City 
Minneapolis 



San Francisco 
New Orleans 
Montreal, Can. 



Prices in effect January 5, 1909. Subject to change without notice^ 



THE SPALDING 

GUARANTEES 
-^ QUALITY 



fc&s 



^TRADE-MARK 

I ACCEPT NO 

SUBSTITUTE_$^| 







SPALDING FIELDERS' MITTS 

Spalding "league Extra" Pitchers' and Basemen's Mitt 

No. IF. The nearest approach yet made to an all around 

mitt. Face of special quality white buck, balance 

special brown calfskin. Correctly padded : no hump. 

Laced all around and at thumb. . Each, $4.00 

Spalding "League Special" Fielders' Mitt 

No. 2F. Molded brown calfskin face; extra full thumb, 

laced; leather lined Each, $3.00 

Spalding "League Special" Fielders' Mitt 
No. 3F. Specially tanned black calfskin; best felt pad- 
ding; laced at thumb; leather lined. Each, $3.00 
Spalding "League Special" Fielders' Mitt 
No. 4F. Very best and softest white tanned buckskin; 
thumb and at wrist extra well padded; laced thumb; 

leather lined Each, $3.00 

Spalding "Professional" Fielders' Mitt 
No. 5F. Specially tanned drab leather, well padded 
withiine felt; leather lined, carefully finished, laced 
thumb. Strap-and-buckle fastening- at back. $2.00 
Spalding "Semi-Pro" Fielders' Mitt 
No. 6F. Face of white tanned buckskin, brown leather 
back; leather lined; laced thumb. . Each, $1.50 
Spalding "Amateur" Fielders' Mitt 
No. 7F. Made throughout of good quality pearl colored 
smooth leather; reinforced and laced at the thumb. 
Strap-and-buckle fastening at back. Each, $1.00 

Spalding "Amateur" Fielders' Mitt (Black) 
No. 8F. Good quality black tanned leather; well pad- 
ded, leather lined; reinforced and laced at thumb. 
Strap-and-buckle fastening at back. Each, $1.00 
Spalding "League Jr." Fielders' Mitt 
No. 9F. A very popular boys' mitt; oak tanned leather, 
well padded; reinforced and laced at thumb. 50c. 
Spalding "Boys' Favorite" Fielders' Mitt 
No. 10F. Special tanned buck, well padded and sub- 
stantially made; laced at thumb. . Each, 25c. 

ALIi STYLES MADE IK - EIGHTS AXD LEFTS 

Complete 
descriptions 
and prices 
in Spalding 7 s 
Base Ball 
Catalogue. 
Mailed free. 



London 
England 



Communications addressed to 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

in any of the following cities will receive attention 
For str.eet numbers see inside front cover of this book 



Edinburgh 
Scotland 



New York 
Buffalo 
Syracuse 



Boston 
Pittsburg 
Cleveland 



Philadelphia 
Washington 
Baltimore 



Chicago 
Detroit 
Atlanta 



St. Louis 
Denver 
Seattle 



Cincinnati 
Kansas City 
Minneapolis 



San Francisco 
New Orleans 
Montreal, Can. 



Prices in effect January 5, 1909. Subject to change without notice. 



I THE SPALDING, 

GUARANTEES | 
r* QUALITY 



|TRADE-MARK 

1 ACCEPT NO 









Spalding Professional" Infielders' Glove 

No. PXL. Best ever made, finest buckskin, 
heavily padded at edges, no heel pad, de- 
sign from prof s ideas, leather lined. $3.50 
Spalding ** Intercollegiate" Infielders' Glove 
No. 2X. Selected velvet tanned buckskin, 
finest felt padding, leather lined. $3.00 
Spalding "League Extra" Infielders' Glove 
No. RXL. Absolutely highest quality. Black 
calf, material, etc., like PXL. Each, $3.50 
Spalding "Inter-City" Infielders* Glove 
No. 2XR. Prof, style, padded little finerer and 
extra large thumb, leather lined. Ea,,$2.50 
Spalding "International" Infielders' Glove 
No. 2XS. Best vel. tanned buckskin, popular 
with professionals, leather lined. Ea.,$2,50 
Spalding " Professional Jr." Infielders* Glove 
No. PBL. Best youths' glove, made like PXL, 
professional style, leather lined. Ea.,$2.50 
Spalding "Professional" Infielders' Glove 
No. PX. Finest buckskin, heavily padded 
around edges. . . . Each, $3,00 

Spalding "League Extra" Infielders' Glove 
No. ItX. Black calfskin, quality and design 
same as PX, highest quality. Each, $3.00 

Spalding " League Special " Infielders' Glove 

No. XW. Specially tanned calfskin, best felt, 

no heel pad, extra long toprotectwrist.$2.50 

Spalding "Semi-Pro" Infielders' Glove 

No. 3X. Good quality oil tanned lea., special 

finish, no heel pad, correctly padded. $2.00 

Spalding " Professional Jr." Infielders' Glove 

No. PB. Youths'. Material, etc. ,as PX. $2.00 

Spalding "Association" Infielders' Glove 
No. -iX. White buck, no heel pad. Ea.,$2.00 

Spalding "Amateur" Infielders' Glove 

No.SXR. Black lea., extra large thumb. $2.00 

Spalding "Club Special" Infielders' Glove 

No. XL. White buck, no heel pad Ea.,$1.50 

Spalding "Champion" Infielders' Glove 
No. X. White buck, leather lined. Ea.,$1.50 

Spalding "Practice" Infielders' Glove 
No.XS. White vel. tanned leather. Ea.,$1.25 
ALL STYLES MADE IN RIGHTS AND LEFTS 



London 
England 



Communications addressed to 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

in any of the following cities will receive attention 

For street numbers see inside front cover of this book 



Edinburgh 
Scotland 



New York 

Buffalo 
Syracuse 



Boston 
Pittsburg 
Cleveland 



Philadelphia 
Washington 
Baltimore 



Chicago 
Detroit 
Atlanta 



St. Louis 
Denver 
Seattle 



Cincinnati 
Kansas City 
Minneapolis 



San Francisco 
New Orleans 
Montreal, Can. 



Prices in effect January 5, 1909^ Subj ect t o^hang e with out notice. 



THE SPALDING 

GUARANTEES 
L^ QUALITY 



^TRADE-MARK 

I ACCEPT NO 

SUBSTITUTE «rJ- 



Spalding Interscholastic" Infielders' Glove 

No. 13. "White velvet tanned leather, correctly pad- 
ded and very durable. . . . Each, $1.00 
Spalding "Boys' Special" Infielders' Glove 
No.XB. Boys' Professional style, palm leather lined 
good quality buck tanned leather throughout: 

welted seams- Each, $1.00 

Spalding "Regulation" Infielders' Glove 

No. 15. Brown tanned leather, correctly padded and 

well made; leather lined. . . Each, $1.00 

Spalding "Regulation" Infielders' Glove 

No. 15R. Black tanned leather, leather lined. $1.00 

Spalding "Public School" Infielders' Glove 

No. 12. Full size glove, white velvet tanned leather 

padded, inside hump, palm leather liiied. Ea. t 75c. 

Spalding "League Jr." Infielders' Glove 

No. 12R. Men's size, black tanned leather. Ea., 75c. 

Spalding "Junior" Infielders' Glove 
No. 16. Fall size, white vel. tan lea., ex. long. Ea.,50c. 

Spalding "Youths'" Infielders' Glove 

No. 17. Good size, special brown smooth tanned 

leather, nicely padded, with inside hump. Ea. , 50c. 

Spalding "Boys' Amateur" Infielders' Glove 

No. 14. Youths' prof, style; buck tan. white leather, 

padded, inside hump, leather lined. Each, 50c. 

Spalding "Boys' Favorite" Infielders' Glove 

No. 19. Made of buck tanned white leather, lightly 

padded, inside hump, palm leather lined. Ea.,25c. 




Spalding Inflated Body Protectors 

We were the first to introduce an inflated body protector, made 
under the Gray patent, and the method used £hen has been re- 
tained in the improved style, with the addition of a special break 
at the bottom which makes it more pliableand convenient. Made 

of best rubber, inflated with air. 

No. 3-0. Full protection; large size. Covering of special imported 

material, and in every particular the best protector made. $8.00 

No. 2-0. Full protection; large size, Best grade covering and a 

very durable protector. . . . . . Each, $6,00 

No. 0. League. Same in every particular as we have been supply- 
ing for years to most of the prominent League catchers. $5.00 
No. 1. Amateur. Quality and design same as we have been fur- 
nishing for years past; full size Each, $4.00 

No. M. Interscholastic, Full size and very well made. ■ 3.00 
No. 2. Youths'. Well made and good size. . * 2.50 

Spalding Umpires' Body Protectors 

Best quality. Give length and width required when ordering. 

No. L. Large size. Ea., $10.00 | No. S. Special design. Ea., $10.00 

Special Base Ball Catalogue Mailed Free, 



London 
England 



Communications addressed to 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

in any of the following cities will receive attention 
For street numbers see inside front cover of this book 



Edinbnrofc 
Scotland 



New York 

Buffalo 
Syracuse 



Boston 
Pittsburg 
Cleveland 



Philadelphia 

Washington 

Baltimore 



Chicago 
Detroit 
Atlanta 



St. Lonis 
Denver 
Seattle 



Cincinnati 
Kansas City 
Minneapolis 



San Francisco 
New Orleans 
Montreal, Can. 



Prices in effect January 5. 1909. Subject to change without notice. 



GUARANTEES 
i|| ^ Q UALITY 




■MARK 

ACCEPT NO 
SUBSTITUTE '— 



**Sun Protecting" Mask 

No. 4-0. Finest steel wire, extra heavy black finish. 
Molded leather chin-strap; hair-filled pads, including 
forehead pad and special elastic head-band. Ea., $4.00 
"Special Soldered" Mask 
No. 6-0. Each crossing of the wire very heavily sold- 
ered. Black finish, continuous padding on sides; detach- 
able cloth sun-shade Each, $4.00 

"Neck Protecting" Mask 

No. 3-0. Affords absolute protection to the neck without 

interfering. Finest steel wire; pads hair-filled. Ea., $3.50 

* 'National Association" Mask 
Extra heavy best annealed steel wire; hair-filled 

Each, $2.50 

"Semi-Pro" League Mask 
Extra heavy best annealed steel wire, continuous 
side pads, leather covered. .... Each, $2.50 

• 'Regulation League" Masks 
No. OX. Men's size, heavy annealed steel wire. Improved 

leather covered pads Each, $2.00 

No. OXB. Same as OX, for youths. • • " 1.75 

Men's, heavy annealed 




No. 2-0. 



No. OP. 



No.O, 
steel wire. . Each, $1.50 
"Amateur" No. A Mask 

No. A. Men's size, black enam- 
eled steel wire, leather covered 
pads, forehead pad. Ea., $1.00 
•'Boys' Amateur" 
No. B Mask 

No. B. Same as No. A, for 
youths. . . Each, $1.00 

"Regulation" No. L. Mask 

No. L. Men's, bright wire, same 
as "Amateur No. A," no head 
or chin-piece. . Each, 75c. 

•'Youths' " No. C Mask 

No. C. Bright wire, leather 
covered pads. . Each, 50c. 

No. D. Bright wire, good mask 

for boys. . . Each, 25c. 

Umpires' Mask 

No. 5-0. Neck-protecting attach- 
ment and special ear protec- 
tion, nicely padded; safest 
style to use. . Each, $5.00 




ROGER BRESNAHAR 



WEARING SPALDING LEG GUARDS 



Spalding Leg Guards for 
Base Ball Catchers 

As supplied to Roger 
Bresnahan of the New 
York National League 
Club and to other pro- 
minent league catchers. 

Knee guard of molded 
sole leather; leg piece 
padded with reeds, light 
and strong; special 
ankle pads as protec- 
tion from sharp spikes. 
Covered with 
special qual- 
ity white 
buck dressed 
leather. 

No. 33 
Spalding 

Catchers' 
Leg Guards. 

Per pair, 

$6.00 



London 
England 



Communications addressed to 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

in any of the following cities will receive attention 

For street numbers see inside fqpht cover of this book 



Edinburgh 
Scotland 



New York 
Buffalo 
Syracuse 



Boston 
Pittsburg 
Cleveland 



Philadelphia 
Washington 
Baltimore 



Chicago 
Detroit 
Atlanta 



St. Louis 
Denver 
Seattle 



Cincinnati 
Kansas City 
Minneapolis 



San Francisco 
New Orleans 
Montreal, Can. 



Prices iji effect January 5, 1909. Subject to change without notice. 



THE SPALDING, 

GUARANTEES j 
r> QUALITY 



5^TR A D E - M ARK I 

SalbJ ACCEPT NO 
^ ^ SUBSTITUTE «r Ji 




Why Spalding 
Uniforms Are Best 



BECAUSE we possess a perfect fac- 
tory equipment and for over thirty 
years we have been making: Base Ball 
Clothing", accumulating- during that 
time a superior knowledge of the re- 
quirements of the Base Ball Player, 
which knowledge, together with all 
the advantages of our superior factory 
facilities the purchaser receives the 
benefit of in every. Spalding Uniform 
we make. All Spalding Uniforms consist 
of Shirt, Pants, Cap, Belt and Stockings. 

The Spalding Uniform No. 0— Highest Grade Made 

Workmanship and material very highest quality throughout. Colors: Red 
Stripe, Green Stripe, Navy Blue Check, White, Blue Gray, Brown Gray, 
Dark Gray, Black, Green, Maroon, Navy Blue, Brown and Cardinal. 

The Spalding Uniform No. 0. . . Complete, $15.00 $|0 Cfl 
Net price to clubs ordering for entire team. . Suit, v-l^uvv 

The University Uniform No. 1 

Equal to No. Uniform, but slightly lighter. Colors : Red Stripe, Green 
Stripe, Navy Blue Check, White, Blue Gray, Brown Gray, Dark Gray, 
Black, Green, Maroon, Navy Blue, Brown and Cardinal, 

The University Uniform No. 1. . . Complete, $12.50 $1flflA 
Net price to clubs ordering for entire team. . Suit, vJ-v»VV 

The Interscholastic Uniform No. 2 

One of our most popular suits, and will give the best of satisfaction. 
Can usually be worn two seasons. Colors : White, Blue Gray, Brown Gray, 
Dark Gray, Black, Green, Maroon, Navy Blue, Brown and Cardinal. 

The Interscholastic Uniform No. 2. . Complete, $9.00 $7 CA 
Net price to clubs ordering for entire team. . . Suit, vi »vv 

The Minor League Uniform No. M 

A very popular and satisfactory uniform. Well made of very durable 
material. Colors : Navy Blue, Blue Gray, Dark Gray and White. 

The Minor League Uniform No. M. . Complete, $9.00 $7 CA 
Net price to clubs ordering for entire team. . Suit, vl»tPV 

The City League Uniform No. P 

Good quality uniform, in neat and attractive checks, plaids and stripes. 
Finished like our best quality uniforms. Colors : Brown Check, White 
with Blue Check, Brownish Blue Shadow Plaid, Grayish Brown with Blue 
Stripe, Bluish Gray, Light Blue Plaid and Brown Stripe. 

The City League Uniform No. P. . . Complete, $7.50 Jg QA 



Net price to clubs ordering for entire team. . 



Suit, 



London 
England 



Communications addressed to 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

in any of the following cities will receive attention 
For street numbers see inside front cover of this book 



Edinburgh 
Scotland 



New York 
Buffalo 
Syracuse 



Boston 
Pittsburg 
Cleveland 



Philadelphia 
Washington 
Baltimore 



Chicago 
Detroit 
Atlanta 



St. Louis 
Denver 
Seattle 



Cincinnati 
Kansas City 
Minneapolis 



San Francisco 
New Orleans 
Montreal, Can. 



Prices in effect January 5 , 1909., S ubject to jchange without notice. 



THE SPALDING 

GUARANTEES 
f > QUAL ITY ♦ 



zgxss 



&TRADE~MARK I 

I ACCEPT NO 
f SUBSTITUTE ^>yl 



The Club Special Uniform No. 3 

Well finished; a most excellent outfit for amateur clubs. Colors : White, 
Blue Gray, Brown Gray, Dark Gray, Maroon and Black. 

The Club Special Uniform No. 3. . . Complete, $6.00 £E ft(J 
Net price to clubs ordering for entire team. . . Suit, vw«"" 

The Amateur Special Uniform No. 4 

Very popular with the younger base ball players. Colors : White, Light 
Gray, Blue Gray, Brown Gray, Maroon, Navy Blue, Green. 

The Amateur Special Uniform No. 4. . Complete, $5.00 $ J A A 
Net price to clubs ordering for entire team. . . Suit, v *«v" 

The Spalding Junior Uniform No. 5 

For boys and youths. Colors: Slate, Cardinal, Navy Blue, Blue Gray, Brown 

Mixed. The Spalding Junior Uniform No. 5. Complete, $4.00 <£Q AA 

Net price to clubs ordering for 9 or more uniforms. Suit, vw»vV 

No extra charge for lettering shirts with name of club nor for detachable 

sleeves on foregoing uniforms. Extra charge for all lettering on caps* 

The Spalding Youths' Uniform No. 6 

Very well made of good quality Gray material. . Complete, J| A A 
1 felt letter only on shirt. Extra charge for all lettering on caps. v-i.»w 
No larger sizes than 30-in. waist and 34-in. chest furnished in No. 6 uniform. 
Measurement blank and complete assortment of samples and prices free. 



Spalding Base Ball Coats 

Made of base 
ball flannel, 
trimmed with 
different col- 
ors on collar, 
cuffs and pock- 
ets. Large 
pearl buttons 
on front. The 
best of work- 
in a n s h i p 
throughout. 
In ordering state color of material 
and trimming desired. Samples 
snowing qualities and colors of ma- 
terial, also measurement blanks 
furnished on application. No extra 
charge for diamond and one felt 
letter on each sleeve. Size of dia- 
mond not over 6% inches. 
To clubs purchasing with uniforms 
or nine or more coats at one time, 
Each, $9.50, $9.00, $7.50, $5.00 




Separate Shirts and Pants 

Furnished at regular list 
prices with either button 
or lace front, lettered on 
front with name of club 
(except No. 6 quality) and 
with detachable sleeves. 
Different color collar and 
cuffs no extra charge (ex- 
cept Nos. 5 and 6 qualities) 

SHIRTS 
No. The Spalding . . 
No, 1 University . . 
No. 2 Inter scholastic , 
No. 3 Club Special . . 
No. 4 Amateur Special 
No. 5 Junior .... 

PANTS 
No. The Spalding . . 
No. 1 University . . 
No. 2 Interscholastic . 
No. 3 Club Special . < . 
No. 4 Amateur Special 
No. 5 Junior .... 




London 
England 



Communications addressed to 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

in any of the following cities will receive attention 
For street numbers see inside front cover of this book 



Edinburgh 
Scotland 



New York 
Buffalo 
Syracuse 



Boston 
Pittsburg 
Cleveland 



Philadelphia! Chicago 
Washington I Detroit 
Baltimore , Atlanta 



St. Louis 
Denver 
Seattle 



Cincinnati 
Kansas City 
Minneapolis 



San Francisco 
New Orleans 
Montreal, Can. 



Prices in effect January 5, 1909. Subject to change without notice. 



THE SPALDING 

GUARANTEES 
r* QUALITY 



^TRADE-MARK 

I ACCEPT NO 

SUBSTITUTE $^l 






tio.cow «5 



■ i a \*. •. mt. orrr 

Spalding Vest Sweater 

No. VG. Best worsted, heavy weight, pearl buttons. 
Gray or white only. Special trimmed edging- and cuffs 
in stock colors supplied at no extra charge. Each, $6.00 

Boys 9 Jacket Sweater 
No. 3JB. All wool jacket sweater, pearl buttons. 
Gray only; 30 to 36 inch chest measurement. Each, $3.00 

Spalding Ribbed Coat Sweater 
No. CDW. Good quality worsted, ribbed knit, gray 
only. Special trimmed edging and cuffs in stock colors 
supplied at no extra charge. . . Each, $5.00 

SPECIAL NOTICE— We will furnish any of the above 
solid color sweaters with one color body and another 
color (not striped) collar and cuffs in stock colors only 
at no extra charge. This does not apply to the No. 3 JB 

Spalding T Shirt for Pitchers 
No. T. Merino,fleece lined,roll collar.long sleeves. $3.50 

Spalding Base Ball Stockings 
A great variety of colors and styles. 25c. to $1.75 pair 

Spalding Base Ball Belts 
Leather, worsted and cotton web, all styles. 10c. to $2.00 

Spalding Base Ball Caps 

In six qualities and all styles. . 25c. to $1.25 each 

Umpire Blouses 

■ ^—4 u» » No. Quality Flannel $6.00 No. 2 Quality Flannel $4.00 

65 No. 1 Quality Flannel 5.00 No. 3 Quality Flannel 3.50 

Extra Sleeve for Pitchers 

i No. S A very useful article, all wool merino; fleece 

lined. Elastic at top Each, 50c. 

The Spalding 
Improved Patent Ankle Supporter 
Worn over or under stocking and support the ankle 
admirably, while not interfering in any 
way with free movements. Relieve pain 
immediately and cure a sprain in a re- 
markably short time. In ordering, give 

size of shoe worn. 
No. H. Soft tanned Ieather,best qual- 
ity. There is no seam in back of supporter 
and the leather is specially shaped to fit back 
of foot snugly over heel. . Pair, $1.00 

No. SH. Sheepskin, well made .50 

No. CH. Black duck, lined and bound. .25 V , Mi 0T^ (Pat.Julyl4,'08> 






London 
England 



Communications addressed to 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

in any of the following cities will receive attention 

For street numbers see inside front cover of this book 



Edinburgh 
Scotland 



New York 
Buffalo 
Syracuse 



Boston 
Pittsbirg 
Cleveland 



Philadelphia 
Washington 
Baltimore 



Chicago 
Detroit 
Atlanta 



St. Louis 
Denver 
Seattle 



Cincinnati 
Kansas City 
Minneapolis 



San Francisco 
New Orleans 
Montreal, Can. 



Prices in effect January 5 ^1909. Sv^ject_to_ch^ge_witkoui .notice. 



THE SPALDING^g^TRADE-MARK 

GUARANTEES liBSfflbl ACCEPT NO 



GUARANTEES 
> QUALITY 



SUBSTITUTE 



«co.y.«.«AT • 




SPALDING BASE BALL SHOES 

Spalding Highest Quality Base Ball Shoe 

No. 2-0. Hand made throughout; specially 
selected kangaroo leather. No pains or ex- 
pense have been spared in making this shoe 
not only the very highest in quality, but per- 
fect in every other detail. The plates are of i 
the finest hand-forged razor steel and are 
firmly riveted to heel and sole. Pair, $ 7 .00 

Spalding Sprinting Base Ball Shoe 

No. 30-S B Selected kangaroo leather and 
built on our famous running shoe last. Is 
strongly made, and, while extremely light in 
weight, will be found substantial in con- 
struction. Hand sewed and a strictly bench 
made shoe. Rawhide thong laces. $7 .00 

Spalding "Featherweight" Base Ball Shoe 

The Lightest Base Ball Shoe Ever Made. 
Size op Shoe— 5 6 7 8 9 
Weight (Ozs.) 18 1856 19 20 21 
No. FW. Owing to the lightness and fine- 
ness of its construction, it is suitable for the 
exacting demands of the fastest players, but 
as a light weight durable shoe for general use 
or for the ordinary player, we recommend 
our No. 30-S. Hand sewed and a strictly 
bench made shoe. Rawhide thong laces. 

Per pair, $7.00 

Spalding Club Special Shoe 

No. O . Carefully selected satin calf skin,ma- 
chine sewed; substantially constructed.first- 
class shoe in every particular. Steel plates 
riveted to heel and sole. Per pair, $5.00 

Spalding Amateur Special Shoe 

No. 35. Good quality calfskin, machine 
sewed; very durable ; specially recommended. 
Plates riveted to heel and sole. Pair, $3.50 

Spalding Junior Shoe 

No. 37. A leather. Plates riveted to heel 
and sole. An excellent shoe for the money 
but not guaranteed. • Per pair, $2.50 



London 
England 



Communications addressed to 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

in any of the following cities will receive attention 

For street numbers see inside front cover of this book 



Edinburgh 
Scotland 



New York 
Buffalo 
Syracuse 



Boston 
Pittsbirg 
Cleveland 



Philadelphia 
Washington 
Baltimore 



Chicago 
Detroit 
Atlanta 



St. Louis 
Denver 
Seattle 



Cincinnati 
Kansas City 
Minneapolis 



San Francisco 
New Orleans 
Montreal, Can. 



F nces in effect January 5, 1909., Subj ect to chan ge jajXhm sX notice.. 



THE SPALDING^^TRADE-IVIARK 

GUARANTEES |)PM^bl ACCEPT NO 
r^ QUALITY V& R J& SUBSTITUTE *? 



■iaw.«.»»T.wirr 



Spalding's Base Ball Sundries 

Bandages— Knee, arm, etc., silk and cotton, 75c. to $5 . 50 

Bases. No. O— Canvas, filled, quilted. . Set, 3, 6.00 

No. 1— Canvas, filled, not quilted. . 5.00 

No. 2— Canvas, filled, ordinary quality. " 3.50 

No. 4— Canvas, unfilled, laced. . " 1.00 

Bat Bag's. No. 2— Heavy canvas, for 12 bats. Each, 3 . 50 

No. 3— Same as No. 2, to hold 6 bats. . " 2.00 

No. Ol— Sole leather, for 2 bats. . . " 4.00 

No. 02— Canvas, leather cap at ends. . 1 . 50 

No. 03— Canvas, leather cap one end. . " 1.00 

No. 7— Club, sole leather, for 36 bats. . " 30.00 

Batting 1 Cage, Moveable— Simple and strong. " 50.00 

Emblems — Prices on application. 

Foul Flags-Bunting, lkx 24 in., 7 ft. staff. " 1 . 50 

Glove Softener — Used in place of oil or grease. Box, . 10 

Hackey Ankle Supporter, cures sprains, 25c, 50c. 1.00 

HeelPlates. No. 4-0. Razor steel, sharpened. Pair, .50 

No. 2-0— Hardened steel, sharpened. .25 

No. 1H— Good steel, sharpened. . .10 

Home Plates. No. 1— White rubber. . Each, 10.00 

No. C — Composition, very durable. . '" 5.00 

Indicators, Umpire. No. O — Celluloid. . " .50 

Pitchers' Box Plate. No. 3— White rubber. " 7.50 

Pitchers' Toe Plate. No. A— Aluminum. " .25 

No. B— Brass " .25 

Score Books, No. 1— Pocket size, paper, 7 Barnes." .10 
No. 2— Board, 22 games. . . . .25 

No. 3— Board, 46 games. ... .50 

No. 4- Club size, board,- 30 games. . "1.00 

No. 5— Cloth, 60 games. . . . "1.50 

No. 7— Cloth, 160 games. . . . "3.00 

Score cards. . . . Each, 5c, Doz., .25 
Scoring Tablet. No. 1— Celluloid. . . Each, .25 
Toe Plates. No. 3-0— Razor steel, sharpened. " .50 
No. O— Hardened steel, sharpened. , .25 

No. 1— Good steel, sharpened. . .10 

Uniform Bags. No. 2— Fine bag leather. " 6.00 

No. 1— Best heavy canvas, leather bound. " 3.00 
No. 6 — Canvas roll, leatner straps, handle. " 1.50 
No. 5 — Uniform and bat bag, best canvas. " 4.00 
No. 4— Uniform bag, brown canvas. . " 2.50 

For complete descriptions, prices and illustrations of 

all the latest accessories for Base Ball, send for 

Spalding's Base Ball Catalogue. Mailed free. 







London 
England 



Communications addressed to 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

in any of the following cities will receive attention 
For street numbers see inside front cover of this book 



Edinburgh 
Scotland 



New York 
Buffalo 
Syracuse 



Boston 
Pittsburg 
Cleveland 



Philadelphia 
Washington 
Baltimore 



Chicago 
Detroit 
Atlanta 



St. Louis! Cincinnati 
Denver Kansas City 
Seattle Minneapolis 



San Francisco 
New Orleans 

Montreal, Can. 



Prices in effect January 5, 1909. Subject to change without notice. 




The 

Baseball 
Magazine 

Edited by Jacob C. Morse 

and one of these fine premiums 
for one year for 

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With every subscription we will 
also send the seven back numbers 
Free, so that your files may be com- 
plete. Send to-day, as the back 
numbers are going fast and there 
are only a few left. 

One year's subscription. . .^ A — — 
Either Pocket Lighter or I ALL 

Fountain Pen, 

and 
Seven back numbers, 

while they last 

THE BASEBALL MAGAZINE COMPANY 

Boston, Mass. 



for 

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1 1 I 



Enjoyment and Enlightenment 
For Real Base Ball Fans 

The Sporting News 

Staff of correspondents includes such 
noted writers on base ball as 

JOE VILA . . "Sun" NEW YORK 

W. M. RANKIN . . . "Clipper" NEW YORK 

I. E. SANBORN . . . "Tribune" CHICAGO 

HORACE S. FOGEL "Times" . . PHILADELPHIA 

J AS. E. O'CONNELL "Globe" BOSTON 

H. P. EDWARDS "Plain Dealer" . . . CLEVELAND 

JOS. S. JACKSON " Free Press " DETROIT 

R. S. DAVIS "Press" PITTSBURG 

CHAS. H. ZUBER "Times-Star" CINCINNATI 

A. YAGER "Eagle" BROOKLYN 

J. M. CUMMINGS . . "News" BALTIMORE 

H. G. MERRILL . . . "Record" . . .WILKES-BARRE 



COPY FREE ON REQUEST 

Newsdealers supplied direct 
Return privilege 



THE SPORTING NEWS PUBLISHING CO. 
ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI 



PORTING LIFE 



'The Paper That Made 
Base Ball Popular' ■ 



The Accepted 
Authority on 
Base Ball for 
Twenty-six 
Years 

EVERY SATURDAY 



At All 
Newsdealers 



the Copy 



jg®- Our 1909 base 
ball schedules of 
the National and 
American Leagues 
are the most com- 
prehensive ever is- 
sued. 

Pocket size — 36 
pages each contain- 
ing 

All Games at 
Heme and Abroad 
Group Pictures 
of all the Teams 
this season 
Individual Batting 
Averages 
of all the Players 
and other interest- 
ing statistical 
matter. 

Sent free for the 
asking if you en- 
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CAUTION BASE i^i B «Ys 

Because of your youth and inexperience, advantage fa frequently- 
taken of you base ball boys, by the so called "Just as Good " dealer, who 
tries to palm off on you some of his "Just as Good" Base Ball goods, made 
especially for him by the " Just as Good " manufacturer, when you call 
for the Spalding goods. You are cautioned not to be deceived by this 
"Just as Good" combination, for when you get onto the field you will 
find these "Just as Good" Balls, Bats, Mitts, etc., will not stand the wear 
and punishment of the genuine Spalding articles. Remember that 
Spalding goods are standard the world over, and are used by all the lead- 
ing clubs and players. These " Just as Good " manufacturers endeavor 
to copy the Spalding styles, adopt the Spalding descriptive matter and 
Spalding list prices, and then try to see how very cheap and showy they 
can make the article, so the " Just as Good " dealer can work off these 
imitations on the unsuspecting boy. 

Don't be deceived by the attractive 25 to 40 per cent, discount that 
may be offered you, for remember that their printed prices are arranged 
for the special purpose of misleading you and to enable the "Just as 
Good" dealer ( to offer you this special discount bait. This "discount" 
pill that the " Just aa Good " dealer asks you to swallow is sugar coated 
and covered up by various catchy devices, that are well calculated to 
deceive the inexperienced boy, who will better understand these tricks of 
the trade as he grows older. Remember that all Spalding Athletic Goods 
are sold at the established printed prices, and no dealer is permitted to 
sell them at a greater or less price. Special discounts on Spalding Goods 
are unknown. Everybody is treated alike. This policy persistently 
adhered to makes it possible to maintain from year to year the high 
quality of Spalding Athletic Goods, which depend for their sale on Spald- 
ing: Quality, backed by the broad Spalding Guarantee, and not on any 
deceiving device like this overworked and fraudulent "Discount" scheme 
adopted by all the " Just as Good " dealers. 

Occasionally one of these " Just as Good " dealers will procure some 
of the Spalding well known red boxes, place them in a showy place on 
his ahelves, and when Spalding Goods are called for, will take from these 
Spalding boxes one of the "Just as Good " things, and try to palm it off 
on the boy as a genuine Spalding article. When you go into a store and 
ask for a Spalding article, see to it that the Spalding Trade-Mark is on 
that article, and if the dealer tries to palm off on you something Just as 
Good," politely bow yourself out and go to another store, where the gen- 
uine Spalding article can be procured. 

In purchasing a genuine Spalding Athletic article, you are protected 
by the broad Spalding Guarantee, which reads as follows : 

We Guarantee to each purchaser of an article bearing the 
Spalding Trade-Mark that such article will give satisfaction and a 
reasonable amount of service, when used for the purpose for which 
it was intended and under ordinary conditions and fair treatment. 
We Agree to repair or replace free of charge any such article 
which proves defective in material or workmanship: PROVIDED 
ouch defective article is returned to us, transportation prepaid, 
during the season in which it was purchased, accompanied by 
the name, address and a letter from the user explaining the claim. 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 
Beware of the " Just as Good " manufacturer, who makes "pretty " 
Athletic Goods (as if they were for use as an ornament) at the expense 
of "quality," in order to deceive the dealer ; and beware of the substi- 
tute-dealer who completes the fraud by offering the Just as Good 
article, when Spalding 
Goods are asked for. JZ^^ S? J^l * jt s? 




Standard Quality 

An article that is universally given the appellation "Standard" 
Ss thereby conceded to be the Criterion, to which are compared all other 
things of a similar nature. For instance, the Gold Dollar of the United 
States is the Standard unit of currency, because it must legally contain a 
specific proportion of pure gold, and the fact of its being Genuine is 
guaranteed by the Government Stamp thereon. As a protection to 
the users of this currency against counterfeiting and other tricks, consid- 
erable money is expended in maintaining a Secret Service Bureau of 
Experts. Under the law, citizen manufacturers must depend to a great 
extent upon Trade-Marks and similar devices to protect themselves 
against counterfeit products — without the aid of "Government Detec- 
tives " or " Public Opinion " to assist them. 

Consequently the "Consumer's Protection" against misrepresenta- 
tion and "inferior quality" rests entirely upon the integrity and re- 
sponsibility of the "Manufacturer." 

A. G. Spalding & Bros, have, by their rigorous attention to "Quality/' 
for thirty-three years, caused their Trade-Mark to become known through- 
out the world as a Guarantee of Quality as dependable in their field as 
the U. S. Currency is in its field. 

The necessity of upholding the guarantee of the Spalding Trade- 
Mark and maintaining the Standard Quality of their Athletic Goods, 
is, therefore, as obvious as is the necessity of the Government in main- 
taining a Standard Currency. 

Thus each consumer is not only insuring himself but also protecting 
other consumers when he assists a Reliable Manufacturer in upholding 
his Trade-Mark and all that it stands for. Therefore, we urge all users 
of our Athletic Goods to assist us in maintaining the Spalding Standard 
of Excellence, by insisting that our Trade-Mark be plainly stamped on 
all athletic goods which they buy, because without this precaution our 
best efforts towards maintaining Standard Quality and preventing fraud- 
ulent substitution will be ineffectual. 

Manufacturers of Standard Articles invariably suffer the reputation 
of being high-priced, and this sentiment is fostered and emphasized 
by makers of "inferior goods," with whom low prices are the main 
consideration. 

A manufacturer of recognized Standard Goods, with a reputation 
to uphold and a guarantee to protect, must necessarily have higher 
prices than a manufacturer of cheap goods, whose idea of and basis of 
a claim for Standard Quality depends principally upon the eloquence 
of the salesman. 

We know from experience that there is no quicksand more unstable 
than poverty in quality— and we avoid this quicksand by Standard Quality. 



\^Z^<^z^L^ frtfi*~< 




Leaote Ball 



Q 



Used exclusively by National league, majority of Minor Leagues, 

awl by all Intercollegiate and other Associations for the past 

!;flilr1jr-tux» years. Price, $1.25 each; $15.00 per dozen. 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 



"5> 



19 



Group L.Jvlo. I MARCH. 1910. 




PUBLISHED BY 

JHEtyCBfl SPORTS WBIiISHSC CO., 

tjbiM* 31 Warren Street, New York City^ ^-\\ 




A.G.Spalding & Bros. 

MAINTAIN, THEIR OWN HOUSES 
■':> ';_ FOR DISTRIBUTING THE 

SPALDING 

^^ COMPLETE LINE OF 

Athletic Goods 

.,.,>. IN THE FOLLOWING CITIES . .^/ 




, 




Pm. 



NEW YORK 

124-128 Nassau St. 
29-33 West 42d St. 
BOSTON, MASS. 

141 Federal Street 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 
1210 Chestnut Street 
PITTSBURG, PA. 

439 Wood Street 
BUFFALO, N. Y. 

611 Main Street 
SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

University Block 
BALTIMORE, MD. 
208 East Baltimore St. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

709 14thSt.,N.W. 
NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

140 Carondelet St. 
ATLANTA, GA. 

74 N. Broad Street 
DALLAS, TEX. 

355 Commerce St. 
MONTREAL, CAN. 
443 St. James Street 



CHICAGO 

147-149 Wabash Ave. 
ST. LOUIS 

415 North Seventh St. 
CINCINNATI, O. 

119 East Fifth St. 
CLEVELAND, O. 

741 Euclid Ave. 
COLUMBUS, O. 

191 South High St. 
DETROIT, MICH. 

254 Woodward Ave. 
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 
39 Sixth St., South 
ST. PAUL, MINN. 

386 Minnesota St. 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 

1111 Walnut St. 
DENVER, COL. 

1616 Arapahoe St. 
SAN FRANCISCO 

156-158 Geary St. 
SEATTLE, WASH. 

711 Second Ave. 




LONDON, ENGLAND (Three Stores) 

78, Cheapside 3 1 7-3 18, High Holborn, W. C. 

West End Branch : 29, Haymarket, S. W. 

BIRMINGHAM, ENG. EDINBURGH, SCOT. 

57 New Street 3 South Charlotte St. (cor. Princes St.) 

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA, 228 Clarence St. 




THE SPALDING TRADE MARK 
IS REGISTERED IN THE UNITED 
STATES PATENT OFFICE, ALSO 
IN 27 FOREIGN COUNTRIES. 
INFRINGERS ARE WARNED. 





— 



THE SPALDING TRADE-MARK IS THE r v*j 
FOUNDATION OF THE SPALDING BUSINESS 



Spalding's 
Athletic Library 

Anticipating the present ten- 
dency of the American people 
toward a healthful method of living 
and enjoyment, Spalding's Athletic 
Library was established in 1892 for 
the purpose of encouraging ath- 
letics in every form, not only by 
publishing the official rules and 
records pertaining to the various 
pastimes, but also by instructing, 
until to-day Spalding's Athletic 
Library is unique in its own par- 
ticular field and has been conceded 
the greatest educational series on 
athletic and physical training sub- 
jects that has ever been compiled. 
The publication of a distinct 
series of books devoted to athletic 
sports and pastimes and designed 
to occupy the premier place in 
America in its class was an early 
idea of Mr. A. G. Spalding, who 
was one of the first in America 
to publish a handbook devoted to 
athletic sports, Spalding's Official 
Base Ball Guide being the initial 
number, which was followed at intervals with other handbooks on the 
sports prominent in the '70s. 

Spalding's Athletic Library has had the advice and counsel of Mr. A. G. 

Spalding in all of its undertakings, and particularly in all books devoted 

the national game. This applies especially to Spalding's Official 

se Ball Guide and Spalding's Official Base Ball Record, both of which 

^ceive the personal attention of Mr. A. G. Spalding, owing to his early 

connection with the game as the leading pitcher of the champion Boston 

and Chicago teams of 1872-76. His interest does not stop, however, with 

matters pertaining to base ball; there is not a sport that Mr. Spalding 

does not make it his business to become familiar with, and that the 

Library will always maintain its premier place, with Mr. Spalding's able 

counsel at hand, goes without saying. 

The entire series since the issue of the first number has been under 
+ he direct personal supervision of Mr, James E. Sullivan, President 
the American Sports Publishing Company, and the total series of 
lsecutive numbers reach an aggregate of considerably over three 
idred, included in which are many "annuals," that really constitute 
history of their particular sport in America year by year, back copies 
which are even now eagerly sought for, constituting as they do the 
lly first authentic records of events and official rules that have ever 
m consecutively compiled. 

#hen Spalding's Athletic Library was founded, seventeen years ago, 
ack and field athletics were practically unknown outside the larger 
leges and a few athletic clubs in the leading cities, which gave occa- 
>nal meets, when an entry list of 250 competitors was a subject of com- 
ent; golf was known only by a comparatively few persons; lawn tennis 
i ad some vogue and base ball was practically the only established field 




A. G. Spalding 



EDITORS OF SPALDING'S ATHLETIC LIBRARY 

sport, and that in a professional way; basket ball had just been invented; 
athletics for the schoolboy— and schoolgirl— were almost unknown, and 
an advocate of class contests in athletics in the schools could not get a 
hearing-. To-day we find the greatest body of athletes in the world ia 
the Public Schools Athletic League of Greater New York, which has had 
an entry list at its annual games of over two thousand, and in whose 
"elementary series" in base ball last year 106 schools competed for the 
trophy emblematic of the championship. 

While Spalding's Athletic Library cannot claim that the rapid growth 
j of athletics in this country is due to it solely, the fact cannot be denied 
that the books have had a great deal to do with its encouragement, by 
printing the official rules and instructions for playing the various games 
at a nominal price, within the reach of everyone, with the sole object 
that its series might be complete and the one place where a person 
could look with absolute certainty for the particular book in which he 
might be interested. 

In selecting the editors and writers for the various books, the lead- 
ing authority in his particular line has been obtained, with the result 
that no collection of books on athletic subjects can compare with 
Spalding's Athletic Library for the prominence of the various authors 
and their ability to present their subjects in a thorough and practical 
manner. 

A short sketch of a few of those who have edited some of the lead- 
ing numbers of Spalding's Athletic Library is given herewith ; 



JAMES E. SULLIVAN 

President American Sports Publishing Com- 
pany; entered the publishing house of Frank 
Leslie in 1878, and has been connected continu- 
ously with the publishing business since then 
and also as athletic editor of various New 
York papers; was a competing athlete; one of 
the organizers of the Amateur Athletic Union 
of the United States; has been actively on its 
board of governors since its organization until 
the present time, and President for two suc- 
cessive terms; has attended every champion- 
ship meeting in America since 1879 and has officiated in some capacity in 
connection with American amateur championships track and field games 
for nearly twenty-five years; assistant American director Olympic Games, 
Paris, 1900; director Pan-American Exposition athletic department, 1901; 
chief department physical culture Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. 
Louis, 1904; secretary American Committee Olympic Games, at Athens, 
1906; honorary director of Athletics at Jamestown Exposition, 1907; secre- 
tary American Committee Olympic Games, at London, 1908; member of 
the Pastime A. C, New York: honorary member Missouri A. C, St. Louis; 
honorary member Olympic A. C, San Francisco; ex-president Pastime 
A. C, New Jersey A. C, Knickerbocker A. C; president Metropolitan 
Association of the A. A. U. for fifteen years; president Outdoor Recrea- 
tion League; with Dr. Luther H. Gulick organized the Public Schools 
Athletic League of New York, and is now chairman of its games commit- 
tee and member executive committee; was a pioneer in playground work 
and one of the organizers of the Outdoor Recreation League of New York ; 
appointed by President Roosevelt as special commissioner to the Olympic 
Games at Athens, 1906, and decorated by King George I. of the Hellenes 
(Greece) for his services in connection with the Olympic Games; ap- 
pointed special commissioner by President Roosevelt to the Olympic 
Games at London, 1908; appointed by Mayor McClellan, 1908, as member 
of the Board of Education of Greater New York. 




EDITORS OF SPALDING'S ATHLETIC LIBRARY 




WALTER CAMP 

For quarter of a century Mr. Walter Camp 
of Yale has occupied a leading position in col- 

t\ lege athletics. It is immaterial what organiza- 
\ tion is suggested for college athletics, or for 
J the betterment of conditions, insofar as college 
athletics is concerned, Mr. Camp has always 
played an important part in its conferences, 
and the great interest in and high plane of 
college sport to-day, are undoubtedly due more 
to Mr. Camp than to any other indi vidu al . Mr. 
Camp has probably written more on college 
athletics than any other writer and the leading papers and maga- 
zines of America are always anxious to secure his expert opinion on foot 
ball, track and field athletics, base ball and rowing. Mr. Camp has grown 
up with Yale athletics and is a part of Yale's remarkable athletic system. 
While he has been designated as the "Father of Foot Ball," it is a well 
known fact that during his college career Mr. Camp was regarded as one 
of the best players that ever represented Yale on the base ball field, so 
when we hear of Walter Camp as a foot ball expert we must also remem- 
ber his remarkable knowledge of the game of base ball, of which he is a 
great admirer. Mr. Camp has edited Spalding's Official Foot Ball Guide 
since it was first published, and also the Spalding Athletic Library book 
on How to Play Foot Ball. There is certainly no man in American college 
life better qualified to write for Spalding's Athletic Library than Mr CT 
Camp. 



DR. LUTHER HALSEY GULICK 

The leading exponent of physical training 
in America; one who has worked hard to im- 
press the value of physical training in the 
schools; when physical training was combined 
with education at the St. Louis Exposition in 
1904 Dr. Gulick played an important part in 
that congress; he received several awards for 
his good work and had many honors conferred 
upon him; he is the author of a great many 
books on the subject; it was Dr. Gulick, who, 
acting on the suggestion of James E. Sullivan, 
organized the Public Schools Athletic League of Greater New York, and 
was its first Secretary; Dr. Gulick was also for several years Director of 
Physical Training in the public schools of Greater New York, resigning 
the position to assume the Presidency of the Playground Association of 
America. Dr. Gulick is an authority on all subjects pertaining to phys- 
ical training and the study of the child. 





JOHN B. FOSTER 

Successor to the late Henry Chadwick 
("Father of Base Ball") as editor of Spald- 
ing's Official Base Ball Guide; sporting editor 
of the New York Evening Telegram; has 
been in the newspaper business for many 
years and is recognized throughout America 
as a leading writer on the national game; a 
staunch supporter of organized base ball, 
his pen has always been used for the better- 
ment of the frame. 



EDITORS OF SPALDING* S ATHLETIC LIBRARY 




TIM MURNANE 

Base Ball editor of the Boston Globe and 
President of the New England League of 
Base Ball Clubs; one of the best known base 
ball men of the country; known from coast 
to coast; is a keen follower of the game and 
prominent in all its councils; nearly half a 
century ago was one of America's foremost 
players: knows the game thoroughly and 
writes from the point of view both of player 
and an official. 




HARRY PHILIP BURCHELL 

Sporting editor of the New York Times; 
graduate of the University of Pennsylvania; 
editor of Spalding's Official Lawn Tennis 
Annual; is an authority on the game; follows 
the movements of the players minutely and 
understands not only tennis but all other sub- 
jects that can be classed as athletics; no one 
is better qualified to edit this book than Mr. 
Burchell. 



GEORGE T. HEPBRON 

Former Young Men's Christian Association 
director; for many years an official of the 
Athletic League of Young Men's Christian 
Associations of North America ; was con- 
nected with Dr. Luther H. Gulick in Young 
Men's Christian Association work for over 
twelve years; became identified with basket 
ball when it was in its infancy and has fol- 
lowed it since, being recognized as the lead- 
ing exponent of the official rules; succeeded 
Dr. Gulick as editor of the Official Basket Ball. 

Guide and also editor of the Spalding Athletic Library book on How to 

Play Basket Ball. 





JAMES S. MITCHEL 

Former champion weight thrower; holder 
of numerous records, and is the winner of 
more championships than any other individual 
in the history of sport ; Mr. Mitchel is a close 
student of athletics and well qualified to write 
upon any topic connected with athletic sport ; 
has been for years on the staff of the New 
York Sun, 



EDITORS OF SPALDING? S ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



MICHAEL C. MURPHY 

The world's most famous athletic trainer; 
the champion athletes that he has developed 
for track and field sports, foot ball and base ball 
fields, would run into thousands; he became 
famous when at Yale University and has 
been particularly successful in developing 
what might be termed championship teams; 
his rare good judgment has placed him in an 
enviable position in the athletic world; now 
with the University of Pennsylvania ; dur- 
ing his career has trained only at two col- 
leges and one athletic club, Yale and the 
University of Pennsylvania and Detroit Athletic Club; his most recent 
triumph was that of training the famous American team of athletes 
that swept the field at the Olympic Games of 1903 at London. 





DR. C. WARD CRAMPTON 

Succeeded Dr. Gulick as director of physical 
training in the schools of Greater New York : 
as secretary of the Public Schools Athletic 
League is at the head of the most remarkable 
organization of its kind in the world; is a 
practical athlete and gymnast himself, and 
has been for years connected with the physi- 
cal training system in the schools of Greater 
New York, having had charge of the High 
School of Commerce. 




DR. GEORGE J. FISHER 

Has been connected with Y. ML C. A. work 
for many years as physical director at Cincin- 
nati and Brooklyn, where he made such a high 
reputation as organizer that he was chosen to 
succeed Dr. Luther H. Gulick as Secretary of 
the Athletic League of Y. M. C. A.'s of North 
America, when the latter resigned to take 
charge of the physical training in the Public 
Schools of Greater New York. 



DR. GEORGE ORTON 

On athletics, college athletics, particularly 
track and field, foot ball, soccer foot ball, and 
training of the youth, it would be hard to find 
one better qualified than Dr. Orton; has had 
the necessary athletic experience and the 
ability to impart that experience intelligently 
to the youth of the land; for years was the 
American, British and Canadian champion 
runner. 



EDITORS OF SPALDING' S ATHLETIC LIBRARY 








FREDERICK R. TOOMBS 

A well known authority on skating, rowing, 
boxing, racquets, and other athletic sports; 
was sporting editor of American Press Asso- 
ciation, New York; dramatic editor; is a law- 
yer and has served several terms as a member 
of Assembly of the Legislature of the State of 
New York; has written several novels and 
historical works. 



R. L. WELCH 

A resident of Chicago; the popularity of 
indoor base ball is chiefly due to his efforts; 
a player himself of no mean ability; a first- 
class organizer; he has followed the game of 
indoor base ball from its inception. 



DR. HENRY S. ANDERSON 

Has been connected with Yale University 
for years and is a recognized authority on 
gymnastics; is admitted to be one of the lead- 
ing authorities in America on gymnastic sub- 
jects; is the author of many books on physical 
training. 



CHARLES M. DANIELS 

Just the man to write an authoritative 
book on swimming; the fastest swimmer the 
world has ever known; member New York 
Athletic Club swimming team and an Olym- 
pic champion at Athens in 1906 and London, 
1908. In his book on Swimming, Champion 
Daniels describes just the methods one must 
use to become an expert swimmer. 

GUSTAVE BOJUS 

Mr. Bojus is most thoroughly qualified to 
write intelligently on all subjects pertaining 
to gymnastics and athletics; in his day one 
of America's most famous amateur athletes; 
has competed successfully in gymnastics and 
many other sports for the New York Turn 
Verein; for twenty years he has been prom- 
inent in teaching gymnastics and athletics; 
was responsible for the famous gymnastic 
championship teams of Columbia University; 
now with the Jersey City high schools. 



EDITORS OF SPALDING'S ATHLETIC LIBRARY 








CHARLES JACOBUS 

Admitted to be the "Father of Roque;" 
one of America's most expert players, win- 
ning the Olympic Championship at St. Loui3 
in 1904; an ardent supporter of the game 
and follows it minutely, and much of the 
success of roque is due to his untiring efforts; 
certainly there is no one better qualified to 
write on this subject than Mr. Jacobus. 



DR. E. B. WAR MAN 

Well known as a physical training expert; 
was probably one of the first to enter the f? eld 
and is the author of many books on the sub- 
ject; lectures extensively each year all over 
the country. 



W. J. CROMIE 

Now with the University of Pennsylvania; 
was formerly a Y. M. C. A. physical director; 
a keen student of all gymnastic matters; the 
author of many books on subjects pertaining 
to physical training. 



G. M. MARTIN 

By profession a physical director of the 
Young Men's Christian Association; a close 
student of all things gymnastic, and games 
for the classes in the gymnasium or clubs. 



PROF. SENAC 

A leader in the fencing world; has main- 
tained a fencing school in New York for 
years and developed a great many cham- 
pions; understands the science of fencing 
thoroughly and the benefits to be derived 
therefrom. 



SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 

Q Giving the Titles of all Spalding Athletic Library Books now 
■3 In print, grouped for ready reference c J J 

SPALDING OFFICIAL ANNUALS 

Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide 
Spalding's Official Base Ball Record 
Spalding's Official Foot Ball Guide 
Spalding's Official Soccer Foot Ball Guide 
Spalding's Official Cricket Guide 
Spalding's Official Lawn Tennis Annual 
Spalding's Official Golf Guide 
Spalding's Official Ice Hockey Guide 
Spalding's Official Basket Ball Guide 
Spalding's Official Bowling Guide 
Spalding's Official Indoor Base Ball Guide 
Spalding's Official Roller Polo Guide 
Spalding's Official Athletic Almanac 



No. 


1 


No. 


IA 


No. 


2 


No. 


2A 


No. 


3 


No. 


4 


No. 


5 


No. 


6 


No. 


7 


No. 


8 


No. 


9 


No. 


IO 


No. 


12 



Group l. Base Ball 

No. 1 Spalding* s Official Base Ball 
Guide. 

No. IA Official Base Ball Record. 

No. 202 How to Play Base Ball. 

No. 223 How to Bat. 

No. 232 How to Run Bases. 

No. 230 'How to Pitch. 

No. 229 How to Catch. 

No. 225 How to Play First Base. 

No. 226 How to Play Second Base. 

No. 227 How to Play Third Base. 

No. 228 How to Play Shortstop. 

No. 224^ How to Play the Outfield. 

How to Organize a Base Ball 

Club. [League. 

How to Organize a Base Ball 

How to Manage a Base Ball 

**% < Club. 

How toTrain a Base BallTeam 
How to Captain a Base Ball 
How to Umpire a Game. [Team 
L Technical Base Ball Terms. 

No. 219 Ready Reckoner of Base Ball 
Percentages. 

BASE BALL AUXILIARIES 
No. 319 Minor League Base Ball Guide 
No. 320 Official Book National League 

of Prof. Base Ball Clubs. 
No. 321 Official Handbook National 

Playground Ball Assn. 

Croup II. Foot Ball 

No. 2 Spalding's Official Foot Ball 

Guide. 
No. 334 Code of the Foot Ball Rules. 
No. 324 How to Play Foot Ball. 
No. 2 a Spalding's Official Soccer Foot 

Ball Guide. 
No. 286 How to Play Soccer. 



FOOT BALL AUXILIARY 
No. 332 Spalding's Official Canadian 

Foot Ball Guide. 
No. 335 Spalding's Official Rugby Foot 

Ball Guide. 

Group ill. cricket 

No. 3 Spalding's Official Cricket Guide. 
No. 277 Cricket and How to Play It. 

Group IV. Lawn Tennis 

No. 4 Spalding's Official Lawn Ten- 
nis Annual. 

No. 157 How to Play Lawn Tennis. 

No. 279 Strokes and Science of Lawn 
Tennis. 

Group V. GOlf 

No. 5 Spalding's Official Golf Guide 
No. 276 How to Play Golf . 

Group vi. Hockey 

No. 6 Spalding's Official Ice Hockey 

Guide. * 

No. 304 How to Play Ice Hockey. 
No. 154 Field Hockey. 
("Lawn Hockey. 
No. 188 < Parlor Hockey. 
(Garden Hockey. 
No. 180 Ring Hockey. 

HOCKEY AUXILIARY 
No. 256 Official Handbook Ontario 
Hockey Association. 

Group VII. Basket Ball 

No. 7 Spalding's Official Basket 

Ball Guide. 
No. 193 How to Play Basket Ball. 
No. 318 Basket Ball Guide for Women. 

BASKET BALL AUXILIARY 
No. 323 Official Collegiate Basket Ball 

Handbook. 



ANY OF THE ABOVE BOOKS MAILED POSTPAID UPON RECEIPT OF 10 CENTS 



SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



Group vm. Bowling 

No. 8 Spalding's OMcial Bowling 
Guide. 

Group IX. indoor Base Ball 

No. 9 Spalding's Official Indoor Base 
Ball Guide. 

Group X. Polo 

:No. 10 Spalding's Official Roller Polo 
m Guide. 

'No. 129 Water Polo. 

No. 199 Equestrian Polo. 

Group XI. Miscellaneous Gaines 

No. 201 Lacrosse. 

No. 322 Official Handbook U. S. Inter- 
collegiate Lacrosse League. 
No. 248 Archery. 
No. 138 Croquet. 
No. 271 Roque. 

(Racquets. 
No. 194 < Squash-Racquets. 

( Court Tennis. 
No. 13 Hand Ball. 
No. 167 Quoits. 
No. 170 Push Ball. 
No. 14 Curling. 
No. 207 Lawn Bowls. 
No. 188 Lawn Games. 
No. 189 Children's Games. 

Group xil. Athletics 

No. 12 Spalding's Official Athletic 

Almanac. 

No. 27 College Athletics. 

No. 182 All Around Athletics. 

No. 156 Athletes' Guide. 

No. 87 Athletic Primer. 

No. 273 Olympic Game sat Athens, 1906 

No. 252 How to Sprint. 

No. 255 How to Run 100 Yards. 

No. 174 Distance and Cross Country 

Running. [Thrower. 
No. 259 How to Become a Weight 
No. 55 Official Sporting Rules, [boys. 
No. 246 Athletic Training for School- 
No. *T7 Marathon Running. 
No. aSl Schoolyard Athletics. 

ATHLETIC AUXILIARIES 
No. 311 Amateur Athletic Union Offi- 
cial Handbook. [book. 
No. 316 Intercollegiate Official Hand- 
No. 302 Y. M. C. A. Official Handbook. 
No. 313 Public Schools Athletic 
League Official Handbook. 
No. 314 Public Schools Athletic 
League Official Handbook 
— Girls' Branch. 
No. 308 Official Handbook New York 
Interscholastic Athletic 
Association. 



Group Xlll. 



Athletic 

Accomplishments 



No. 177 How to Swim. 

No. 296 Speed Swimming. 

No. 128 How to Row. 

No. 209 How to Become a Skater. 

No. 178 How to Train for Bicycling. 

No. 23 Canoeing. 

No. 282 Roller Skating Guide. 

Group XIV. Manly sports 

No. 18 Fencing. (ByBreck.) 

No. 162 Boxing. 

No. 165 Fencing. ( By Senac.) 

No. 140 Wrestling. 

No. 236 How to Wrestle. 

No. 102 Ground Tumbling. 

No. 233 Jiu Jitsu. 

No. 166 How to Swing Indian Clubs. 

No. 200 Dumb Bell Exercises. 

No. 143 Indian Clubs and Dumb Bells. 

No. 262 Medicine Ball Exercises. 

No. 29 Pulley Weight Exercises. 

No. 191 How to Punch the Bag. 

No. 289 Tumbling for Amateurs. 

No. 326 Professional Wrestling. 

Group XV. Gymnastics 

No. 104 Grading of Gymnastic Exer- 
cises. [Dumb Bell Drills. 

No. 214 Graded Calisthenics and 

No. 254 Barnjum Bar Bell Drill. 

No. 158 Indoor and Outdoor Gym- 
nastic Games. 

No. 124 How to Become a Gymnast. 

No. 287 Fancy Dumb Bell and March- 
ing Drills. [Apparatus. 

No. 327 Pyramid Building Without 

No. 328 Exercises on the Parallel Bars. 

No. 329 Pyramid Building with 
Wands, Chairs and Ladders 
GYMNASTIC AUXILIARY 

No. 333 Official Handbook I. C. A. A. 
Gymnasts of America. 

Group XVI. Physical culture 

No. 161 Ten Minutes' Exercise for 
Busy Men. [giene. 

No. 208 Physical Education and Hy- 
No. 149 Scientific Physical Training 

and Care of the Body. 
No. 142 Physical Training Simplified. 
No. 185 Hints on Health. 
No. 213 285 Health Answers. 
No. 238 Muscle Building. [ning. 
No. 234 School Tactics and Maze Run- 
No. 261 Tensing Exercises, [nasties. 
No. 285 Health by Muscular Gym- 
No. 288 Indigestion Treated by Gym- 
No. 290 Get Well; Keep Well, [nasties. 
No. 325 Twenty-Minute Exercises. 
No. 330 Physical Training for the 
School and Class Room. 



ANY OF THE ABOVE BOOKS MAILED POSTPAID UPON RECEIPT OF 10 CENTS 



SPALDING ATHLE11C LIBRARY 




Group I. Base Ball 

No. 1— Spalding's Official 
Base Ball Guide. 

The leading Base Ball 
annual of the country, and 
the official authority of 
gjkffi^h the game. Contains the 
Z^hcTr 1 official playing rules, with 
an explanatory index of the 
rules compiled by Mr. A. G. 
Spalding; pictures of all 
the teams in the National, 
American and minor leagues ; re- 
views of the season; college Base Ball, 
and a great deal of interesting in- 
formation. Price 10 cents. 

No. 1A — Spalding's Official 
Base Ball Record. 

Something new in Base Ball. Con- 
tains records of all kinds from the be- 
ginning of the National League and 
official averages of all professional or- 
ganizations for past season. Illustrated 
with pictures of leading teams and 
players. Price 10 cents. 

No. 202— How to Play Base 
Ball. 

Edited by Tim Murnane. New and 
revised edition. Illustrated with pic- 
tures showing how all the various 
curves and drops are thrown and por- 
traits of leading players. Price 10 cents. 

No. 223— How to Bat. 

There is no better way of becoming 
a proficient batter than by reading this 
book and practising the directions. 
Numerous illustrations. Price 10 cents. 

No. 232— How to Ran the 
Bases. 

This book gives clear and concise 
directions for excelling as a base run- 
ner; tells when to run and when not to 
do so; how and when to slide; team 
work on the bases; in fact, every point 
of the game is thoroughly explained. 
Illustrated. Price 10 cents. 

No. 230— How to Pitch. 

A new, up-to-date book. Its contents 
are the practical teaching of men who 
have reached the top as pitchers, and 
who know how to impart a knowledge 
of their art. All the big leagues' 
pitchers are shown. Price 10 cents. 



No. 229— How to Catch. 

Every boy who has hopes of being a 
clever catcher should read how well- 
known players cover their position. 
Pictures of all the noted catchers in 
the big leagues. Price 10 cents. 

No. 225— How to Play First 
Base. 

Illustrated with pictures of all the 
prominent first basemen. Price 10 cents. 

No. 226— How to Play Second 
Base. 

The ideas of the best second basemen 
have been incorporated in this book for 
the especial benefit of boys who want 
to know the fine points of play at this 
point of the diamond. Price 10 cents. 

No. 227— How to Play Third 
Base. 

Third base is, in some respects, the 
most important of the infield. All the 
points explained. Price 10 cents. 

No. 22S— How to Play Short- 
stop. 

Shortstop is one of the hardest posi- 
tions on the infield to fill, and quick 
thought and quick action are necessary 
for a player who expects to make good 
as a shortstop. Illus. Price 10 cents. 

No. 224— How to Play the 
Outfield. 

An invaluable guide for the out- 
fielder. Price 10 cents. 

No. 231— How to Coach; How 
to Captain a Team; How 
to Manage a Team; How 
to Umpire; How to Or- 
ganize a League; Tech- 
nical Terms of Base Ball. 
A useful guide. Price 10 cents. 

Noo 219— Ready Reckoner of 
Base Ball Percentages. 

To supply a demand for a book which 
would show the percentage of clubs 
without recourse to the arduous work of 
figuring, the publishers had these tables 
compiled by an expert. Price 10 cents. 

BASE BALL, AUXILIARIES. 

No. 319— Minor League Base 
Ball Gnide. 

The minors' own guide. Edited by 
President T. H. Murnane, of the New 
England League. Price 10 cents. 



SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



No. 320— Official Handbook 
of the National League 
of Professional Base Ball 
Clubs. 

Contains the Constitution, By-Laws, 
Official Rules, Averages, and schedule 
of the National League for the current 
year, together with list of club officers 
and reports of the annual meetings of 
the League. Price 10 cents. 

\o. 321— Official Handbook 
National Playground Ball 
Association. 

This game is specially adapted for 
playgrounds, parks, etc., is spreading 
rapidly. The book contains a descrip- 
tion of the game, rules and list of 
officers. Price 10 cents. 



Group II. Foot Ball 

No. 2— Spalding's Official 
Foot Ball Guide. 

Edited by Walter Camp. 
Contains the new rules, 
with diagram of field; All- 
America teams as selected 
by the leading authorities; 
reviews of the game from 
various sections of the 
country; scores; pictures. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 334— Code of the Foot 
Ball Rules. 

This book is meant for the use of 
officials, to help them to refresh their 
memories before a game and to afford 
them a quick means of ascertaining a 
point during a game. It also gives a 
ready means of finding a rule in the 
Official Rule Book, and is of great help 
to a player in studying the Rules. 
Compiled by C. W. Short, Harvard, 1908. 
Price 10 cents. 

\o. 324— How to Play Foot 
Ball. 

Edited by Walter Camp, of Yale. 
Everything that a beginner wants to 
know and many points that an expert 
will be glad to learn. Snapshots of 
leading teams and players in action, 
with comments by Walter Camp. 
Price 10 cents. 




No. 2 A— Spalding's Official 
Association Soccer Foot 
Ball Guide. 

A complete and up-to-| 
date guide to the "'Soccer" 
game in the United States, . 
containing instructions for I 
playing the game, official! 
rules, and interesting! 
news from all parts of the V 
country. Illustrated. Price | 
10 cents. 



'■ |LJ. II |,|11U.1 

m 



No. 2S6-How to Play Soc- 
cer. 

How each position should be played, 
written by the best player in England 
in his respective position, and illus- 
trated with full-page photographs of 
players in action. Price 10 cents. 

FOOT BALL. AUXILIARIES. 
No. 33 2— Spalding's Official 



Canadian 
Guide. 



Foot 



Ball 



The official book of the game in Can- 
ada. Price 10 cents. 

No. 335— Spalding's Official 
Rugby Foot Ball Guide. 

Contains the official rules under 
which the game is played in England 
and by the California schools and col- 
leges. Also instructions for playing 
the various positions on a team. Illus- 
trated with action pictures of leading 
teams and players. Price 10 cents. 



Group III. Cricket 

No. 3— Spalding's Official 
Cricket Guide. 

The most complete year 
book of the game that has 
ever been published in 
America. Reports of 
special matches, official 
rules and pictures of all 
the leading teams. Price 
10 cents. 




No. 



and How 



T7 — Cricket; 
to Play it. 

By Prince Ranjitsinhji. The game 
described concisely and illustrated with 
full-page pictures posed especially for 
this book. Price 10 cents. 



SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



Group IV. 



Lawn 
Tennis 



No. 4— Spalding's Official 
Lawn Tennis Annual. 

Contents include reports 
of all important tourna- 
ments; official ranking 
from 1885 to date; laws of 
lawn tennis; instructions 
for handicapping:; deci- 
sions on doubtful points; 
management of tourna- 
ments; directory of clubs; 
out and keeping: a court. Elus- 
Price 10 cents. 





laying: 
trated. 



No. 157— How to Play Lawn 
Tennis. 

A complete description of lawn ten- 
nis; a lesson for beginners and direc- 
tions telling: how to make the most im- 
portant strokes. Illustrated. Price 
10 cents. 

No. 279— Strokes and Science 
of Lawn Tennis. 
By P. A. Vaile, a leading: authority 
on the game in Great Britain. Every 
stroke in the game is accurately illus- 
trated and analyzed by the author. 
Price 10 cents. 



Group V. 

No. 5— Spalding's 
Golf Guide. 

Contains records of all 
important tournaments, 
articles on the game in 
various sections of the 
country, pictures of prom- 
inent players, official play- 
ing rules and general 
items of interest. Price 
10 cents. 



Golf 



Official 



i 



No. 276— How to Play Golf. 

By James Braid and Harry Vardon 
the world's two greatest players tell 
how they play the game, with numer- 
ous full-page pictures of them taken 
n the links. Price 10 cents. 



Group VI. Hockey 

No. 6— Spalding's Official Ice 

Hockey Guide. 

The official year book of 
the game. Contains the 
official rules, pictures of 
leading teams and players, 
records, review of the 
season, reports from dif" 
ferent sections of the 
United States and Canada. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 304— How to Play Ice 
Hockey. 

Contains a description of the duties 
of each player. Illustrated. Price 10 
cents. 

No. 154— Field Hockey. 

Prominent in the sports at Vassar, 
Smith, Wellesley, Bryn Mawr and other 
leading colleges. Price 10 cents. 

No. 188-Lawn Hookey, 
Parlor Hockey, Garden 
Hockey. 

Containing the rules for each game. 
Illustrated. Price 10 cents. 

No. ISO— Ringr Hockey. 

A new game for the gymnasium. 
Exciting as basket ball. Price 10 cents. 

HOCKEY AUXILIARY. 

No. 256— Official Handbook 
of the Ontario Hockey 
Association. 

Contains the official rules of the 
Association, constitution, rules of com- 
petition, list of officers, and pictures of 
leading players. Price 10 cents. 



Group VII. 



Basket 

Ball 



No. 7— Spalding's Official 
Basket Ball Gnide. 

Edited by George T. 
Hepbron. Contains the 
revised official rules, de- 
cisions on disputed points, 
records of prominent 
teams, reports on the game 
from various parts of the I 
country. Illustrated. Price | 
10 cents. 




SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



Xo. 193— How to Play Basket 
Ball. 

By G. T. Hepbron, editor of the 
Official Basket Ball Guide. Illustrated 
with scenes of action. Price 10 cents. 

No. 31S— Official Basket Ball 

Guide for Women, 
Edited by Miss Senda Berenson, of 
Smith College. Contains the official 
playing rules and special articles on 
the game by prominent authorities. 
Illustrated. Price 10 cents. 



BASKET BALL AtXILIARY. 

Xo. 323— Collegiate Basket 
Ball Handbook. 

The official publication of the Colle- 
giate Basket Ball Association. Con- 
tains the official rules, records, All- 
America selections, reviews, and pic- 
tures. Edited by H. A. Fisher, of 
Columbia. Price 10 cents. 



Polo 




Group X. 

Xo. 10— Spalding's 
Official Roller 
Polo Guide. 

Edited by J. C. Morse. 
A full description of the 
game; official rules, re- 
cords; pictures of promi- 
nent players. Price 10 cents 



Xo. 129— Water Polo. 

The contents of this book treat of 
every detail, the individual work of the 
players, the practice of the team, how 
to throw the ball, with illustrations and 
many valuable hints. Price 10 cents, 

Xo. 199— Equestrian Polo. 

^ Compiled by H. L. Fitzpatrick of the 
New York Sun. Illustrated with por- 
traits of leading players, and contains 
most useful information for polo play- 
ers. Price 10 cents. 



Group VIII. Bowling 

Xo. S— Spalding's Official 
Bowling Guide. 

The contents include: 
I diagrams of effective de- 
liveries; hints to begin- 
ners: how to score; official 
rules; spares, how they 
are made: rules for cocked 
hat, quintet, cocked hat 
and feather, battle game, 
1 etc. Price 10 cents. 




Group IX. 



Indoor 
Base Ball 



Xo. 9— Spalding's Official In- 
door Base Ball Guide. 

America's national game 
is now vieing with other 
indoor games as a winter 
pastime. This book con- 
tains the playing rules, 
pictures of leading teams. 
and interesting articles on 
the game by leading _ au- 
thorities on the subject. 
Price 10 cents. 



___ Miscellane- 
GroupXI. ous Games 

Xo. 201— Lacrosse. 

Every position is thoroughly ex- 
plained in a most simple and concise 
manner, rendering it the best manual 
of the game ever published. Illus- 
trated with numerous snapshots of im- 
portant plays. Price 10 cents. 

Xo. 322— Official Handbook: 
t". S. Inter-Collegiate La- 
crosse League. 

Contains the constitution, by-laws, 

playing rules, list of officers and records 
of the association. Price 10 cents. 




Xo. 271— Spalding's Official 
Roque Guide. 

The official publication of the Na- 
tional Roque Association of America, 
| Contains a description of the courts 
and their construction, diagrams, illus- 
trations, rules and valuable informa- 
tion. Price 10 cents. 



SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



No. 138— Spalding's Official 
Croq.net Guide 

Contains directions for playing, dia- 
grams of important strokes, description 
of grounds, instructions for the begin- 
ner, terms used in the game, and the 
official playing rules. Price 10 cents. 

No. 24S— Archery. 

A new and up-to-date book on this 
fascinating pastime. The several 
varieties of archery; instructions for 
shooting; how to select implements; 
how to score; and a great deal of inter- 
esting information. Illustrated. Price 
10 cents. 

No. 194 — Racquets. Squash- 
Racquets and Court Ten- 
nis. 

How to play each game is thoroughly 
explained, and all the difficult strokes 
shown by special photographs taken 
especially for this book. Contains the 
official rules for each game. Price 10 
cents. 

No. 167— Quoits. 

Contains a description of the plays 
used by experts and the official rules. 
Illustrated. Price 10 cents. 

No. 170— Push Ball. 

This book contains the official rules 
and a sketch of the game; illustrated. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 13— How to Play Hand 
Ball. 

By the world's champion, Michael 
Egan. Every play is thoroughly ex- 
plained by text and diagram. Illus- 
trated. Price 10 cents. 

No. 14 — Curling. 

A short history of this famous Scot- 
tish pastime, with instructions for 
play, rules of the game, definitions of 
terms and diagrams of different shots. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 207— Bowling- on the 
Green; or, Lawn Bowls. 

How to construct a green; how to 
play the game, and the official rules 
of the Scottish Bowling Association. 
Illustrated. Price 10 cents. 




No. 189— Children's Games. 

These games are intended for use at 
recesses, and all but the team games 
have been adapted to large classes. 
Suitable for children from three to 
eight years, and include a great variety. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 188-Lawn Games. 

Lawn Hockey, Garden Hockey, Hand 
Tennis, Tether Tennis; also Volley 
Ball, Parlor Hockey, Badminton, Bas- 
ket Goal. Price 10 cents. 



Group XII. Athletics 

No. 12— Spalding's Official 
Athletic Almanac. 

Compiled by J. E. Sulli- 
van, President of the Ama- 
teur Athletic Union. The | 
only annual publication 
now issued that contains 
a complete list of amateur | 
best-on-records; intercol- 
legiate, swimming, inter- |_ 
scholastic, English, Irish, Scotch, 
Swedish, Continental, South African, 
Australasian; numerous photos of in- 
dividual athletes and leading athletic 
teams. Price 10 cents. 

No. 27— College Athletics. 

M. C. Murphy, the well-known ath- 
letic trainer, now with Pennsylvania, 
the author of this book, has written it 
especially for the schoolboy and college 
man, but it is invaluable for the athlete 
who wishes to excel in any branch of 
athletic sport; profusely illustrated. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 1S2— Ail-Around Ath- 
letics. 

Gives in full the method of scoring 
the All- Around Championship; how to 
train for the All-Around Champion- 
ship. Illustrated. Price 10 cents. 

No, 15(>— Athlete's Guide. 

Full instructions for the beginner, 
telling how to sprint, hurdle, jump and 
throw weights, general hints on train- 
ing; valuable advice to beginners and 
important A. A. U. rules and their ex« 
planations, while the pictures comprise 
many scenes of champions in action. 
I Price 10 cents. 



SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



No. 273— Tlie Olympic Games 
at Athens. 

A complete account of the Olympic 
Games of 1906, at Athens, the greatest 
International Athletic Contest ever 
held. Compiled by J. E. Sullivan, 
Special United States Commissioner to 
the Olympic Games. Price 10 cents. 

No. 87— Athletic Primer. 

Edited by J. E. Sullivan, Ex-President 
of the Amateur Athletic Union. Tells 
how to organize an athletic club, how 
to conduct an athletic meeting, and 
gives rules for the government of ath- 
letic meetings; contents also include 
directions for laying out athletic 
grounds, and a very instructive article 
on training. Price 10 cents. 

No. 252— How to Sprint. 

Every athlete who aspires to be a 
sprinter can study this book to advan- 
tage. Price 10 cents. 

No. 255— How to Rnn 100 
Yards. 

By J. W. Morton, the noted British 
champion. Many of Mr. Morton's 
methods of training are novel to 
American athletes, but his success is 
the best tribute to their worth. Illus- 
trated. Price 10 cents. 

No. 174— Distance and Cross- 
Country Rnnning. 

By George Orton, the famous Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania runner. The 
quarter, half, mile, the longer dis- 
tances, and cross-country running and 
steeplechasing, with instructions for 
training; pictures of leading athletes 
in action, with comments by the editor. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 259— Weight Throwing. 

Probably no other man in the world 
has had the varied and long experience 
of James S. Mitchel, the author, in the 
weight throwing department of ath- 
letics. The book gives valuable infor- 
mation not only for the novice, but for 
the expert as well. Price 10 cents. 

No. 246— Athletic Training 
for Schoolboys. 

By Geo. W. Orton. Each event in the 
Intercollegiate programme is treated 
of separately. Price 10 cents. 



No. 55— Official Sporting 
Rnles. 

Contains rules not found in other 
publications for the government of 
many sports; rules for wrestling, 
shuffleboard, snowshoeing, profes- 
sional racing, pigeon shooting, dog 
racing, pistol and revolver shooting, 
British water polo rules, Rugby foot 
ball rules. Price 10 cents. 



ATHLETIC AUXILIARIES. 
No. 311— Official Handbook 
of the A.A.U. 

The A. A. U. is the governing body 
of athletes in the United States of 
America, and all games must be held 
under its rules, which are exclusively 
published in this handbook, and a copy 
should be in the hands of every athlete 
and every club officer in America. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 316— Official Intercolle- 
giate A.A.A.A. Handbook. 

Contains constitution, by-laws, and 
laws of athletics; records from 1876 to 
date. Price 10 cents. 



No. 30S— Official Handbook 
New York Interschol- 
astic Athletic Associa- 
tion. 

Contains the Association's records, 
constitution and by-laws and other 
information. Price 10 cents. 

No. 302— Official Y.M.C.A. 
Handbook. 

Contains the official rules governing 
all sports under the jurisdiction of the 
Y. M. C. A., official Y. M. C. A. scoring 
tables, pentathlon rules, pictures of 
leading Y. M. C. A. athletes. Price 
10 cents. 

No. 313— Official Handbook 
of the Public Schools 
Athletic League. 

Edited by Dr. C. Ward Crampton. 
director of physical education in the 
Public Schools of Greater New York 
Illustrated. Price 10 cents. 



SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



No. 314— Official Handbook 
Girls' Branch of the 
Pnblic Schools Athletic 

League. 

The official publication. Contains: 
constitution and by-laws, list of offi- 
cers, donors, founders, life and annual 
members, reports and illustrations. 
Price 10 cents. 



No. 331— Schoolyard Ath- 
letics. 

By J. E. Sullivan, Ex-President Ama- 
teur Athletic Union and member of 
Board of Education of Greater New 
York. An invaluable handbook for 
the teacher and the pupil. Gives a 
systematic plan for conducting school 
athletic contests and instructs how to 
prepare for the various events. Illus- 
trated. Price 10 cents. 



No. 317— Marathon Running. 

A new and up-to-date book on this 
popular pastime. Contains pictures 
of the leading Marathon runners, 
methods of training, and best times 
made in various Marathon events. 
Price 10 cents. 



Group XIII. Athletic 
Accomplishments 

No. 177— Hott to Swim. 

Will interest the expert as well as 
the novice; the illustrations were made 
from photographs especially posed, 
showing the swimmer in clear water; 
a valuable feature is the series of 
"land drill " exercises for the beginner. 
Price 10 cents. 



No. 296— Speed Swimming, 

By Champion C. M. Daniels of the 
New York Athletic Club team, holder 
of numerous American records, and the 
best swimmer in America qualified to 
write on the subject. Any boy should 
be able to increase his speed in the 
water after reading Champion Daniels' 
instructions on the subject. Price 10 
cents. 



No. 128— How to Row. 

By E. J. Giannini, of the New York 
Athletic Club, one of America's most 
famous amateur oarsmen and cham- 
pions. Shows how to hold the oars, 
the finish of the stroke and other valu- 
able information. Price 10 cents. 

No. 23— Canoeing. 

Paddling, sailing, cruising and rac- 
ing canoes and their uses; with hints 
on rig and management; the choice of 
a canoe; sailing canoes, racing regula- 
tions; canoeing and camping. Fully 
illustrated. Price 10 cents. 

No. 209 — How to Become a 
Skater. 

Contains advice for beginners; how 
to become a figure skater, showing how 
to do all the different tricks of the best 
figure skaters. Pictures of prominent 
skaters and numerous diagrams. Price 
10 cents. 

No. 282— Official Roller Skat- 
ing Guide. 
Directions for becoming a fancy and 
trick roller skater, and rules for roller 
skating. Pictures of prominent trick 
skaters in action. Price 10 cents. 

No. 178— How to Train lor 

Bicycling. 

Gives methods of the best riders 
when training for long or short distance 
races; hints on training. Revised and 
up-to-date in every particular. Price 
10 cents. 



Group XIV. S port! 

No. 140— Wrestling. 

Catch-as-catch-can style. Seventy 
illustrations of the different holds, pho- 
tographed especially and so described 
that anybody can with little effort learn 
every one. Price 10 cents. 

No. 18— Fencing. 

By Dr. Edward Breck, of Boston, 
editor of The Swordsman, a promi- 
nent amateur fencer. A book that has 
stood the test of time, and is universally 
acknowledged to be a standard ^*ork. 
Illustrated. Price 10 cents. 



SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



No. 162— Boxing Guide. 

Contains over 70 pages of illustrations 
showing all the latest blows, posed 
especially for this book under the super- 
vision of a well-known instructor of 
boxing:, who makes a specialty of teach- 
ing: and knows how to impart his 
knowledge. Price 10 cents. 



No. 165— The Art of Fencing: 

By Regis and Louis Senac, of New 
York, famous instructors and leading 
authorities on the subject. Gives in 
detail how every move should be made. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 236— How to Wrestle. 

The most complete and up-to-date 
book on wrestling ever published. 
Edited by F. R. Toombs, and devoted 
principally to special poses and illustra- 
tions by George Hackenschmidt, the 
" Russian Lion." Price 10 cents. 

No. 102— Ground Tumbling. 

Any boy. by reading this book and 
following the instructions, can become 
proficient. Price 10 cents. 



No. 289— Tumbling for Ama- 
teurs. 

Specially compiled for amateurs by 
Dr. James T. Gwathmey. Every variety 
of the pastime explained by text and 
pictures, over 100 different positions 
being shown. Price 10 cents. 

No. x91— How to Pnnch the 
Bag. 

The best treatise on bag punching 
that has ever been printed. Every va- 
riety of blow used in training is shown 
and explained, with a chapter on fancy 
bag punching by a well-known theatri- 
cal bag puncher. Price 10 cents, 

No. 200-Dumb-Bells. 

The best work on dumb-bells that 
has ever been offered. By Prof. G. 
Bojus, of New York. Contains 200 
photographs. Should be in the hands 
of every teacher and pupil of physical 
culture, and is invaluable for home 
exercise. Price 10 cents. 



No. 143— Indian Clubs and 
Dumb-Bells. 

By America's amateur champion club 
swinger, J. H. Dougherty. It is clearly 
illustrated, by which any novice can 
become an expert. Price 10 cents. 

No. 262— Medicine Ball Ex- 
ercises. 

A series of plain and practical exer- 
cises with the medicine ball, suitable 
for boys and girls, business and profes- 
sional men, in and out of gymnasium. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 29— Pnlley Weight Exer- 
cises. 
By Dr. Henry S. Anderson, instructor 
in heavy gymnastics Yale gymnasium. 
In conjunction with a chest machine 
anyone with this book can become 
perfectly developed. Price 10 cents. 

No. 233— Jin Jitsn. 

Each move thoroughly explained and 
illustrated with numerous full-page 
pictures of Messrs. A. Minami and K. 
Koyama, two of the most famous ex- 
ponents of the art of Jiu Jitsu, who 
posed especially for this book. Price 
10 cents. 

No. 166— How to Swine In* 
dian Clubs. 

By Prof. E. B. Warman. By follow- 
ing the directions carefully anyone can 
become an expert. Price 10 cents. 

No. 326— Professional Wrest- 
ling:. 

A book devoted to the catch-as-catch- 
can style; illustrated with half-tone 
pictures showing the different holds 
used by Frank Gotch, champion catch- 
as-catch-can wrestler of the world. 
Posed by Dr. Roller and Charles Postl. 
By Ed. W. Smith, Sporting Editor of 
the Chicago American. Price 10 cents. 



Group XV. Gymnastics 

No. 104— The Grading 1 of 

Gymnastic Exercises. 
By G. M. Martin. A book that should 
be in the hands of every physical direc- 
tor of the Y. M. C. A., school, club, col- 
lege, etc. Price 10 cents. 



SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



Ifo. 214— Graded Calisthen- 
ics and Dumb-Bell Drills. 
For years it has been the custom in 
most gymnasiums of memorizing; a set 
drill, which was never varied. Conse- 
quently the beginner was given the 
same kind and amount as the older 
member. sWith a view to giving uni- 
formity the present treatise is at- 
tempted. Price 10 cents. 

No. 254— Barnjum Bar Bell 
Drill. 

Edited by Dr. R. Tait McKenzie, 
Director Physical Training, University 
of Pennsylvania. Profusely illustrated. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 158— Indoor and Outdoor 

Gymnastic Games. 
A book that will prove valuable to in- 
door and outdoor gymnasiums, schools, 
outings and gatherings where there 
are a number to be amused. Price 10 
cents. 

No. 124— How to Become a 

Gymnast. 
By Robert Stoll, of the New York 
A. C., the American champion on the 
flying rings from 1885 to 1892. Any boy 
can easily become proficient with a 
little practice. Price 10 cents. 

No. 287— Fancy Dumb Bell 
and Marching Drills. 

All concede that games and recreative 
exercises during the adolescent period 
are preferable to set drills and monoton- 
ous movements. These drills, while de- 
signed primarily for boys, can be used 
successfully with girls and men and 
women. Profusely illustrated. Price 
10 cents. 

No. 327— Pyramid Building; 
Without Apparatus. 
By W. J. Cromie, Instructor of 
Gymnastics, University of Pennsyl- 
vania. With illustrations showing 
many different combinations. This 
book should be in the hands of all gym- 
nasium instructors. Price 10 Cents. 

No. 328 — Exercises on the 
Parallel Bars. 

By W. J. Cromie. Every gymnast 
should procure a copy of this book. 
Illustrated with cuts showing many 
novel exercises. Price 10 cents. 



No. 329— Pyramid Building 
with Chairs, Wands and 
Ladders. 

By W. J. Cromie. Illustrated with 
half-tone photopraphs showing many 
interesting combinations. Price 10 
cents. 



GYMNASTIC AUXILIARY. 
No. 333— Official Handbook 
Inter-Collegiate Associa- 
tion Amateur Gymnasts 
of America. 

Edited by P. R. Carpenter, Physical 
Director Amherst College. Contains 
pictures of leading teams and individual 
champions, official rules governing con- 
tests, records. Price 10 cents. 



Group XVI. cufture 

No. 161— Ten Minutes' Exer- 
cise for Busy Men. 

By Dr. Luther Halsey Gulick, Direc- 
tor of Physical Training in the New 
York Public Schools. A concise and 
complete course of physical education. 
Price 10 cents. 



No. 208— Physical Education 
and Hygiene. 

This is the fifth of the Physical 
Training series, by Prof. E. B. Warman 
(see Nos. 142, 149, 166. 185, 213, 261, 290.) 
Price 10 cents. 



No. 149— The Care of the Body. 

A book that all who value health 
should read and follow its instructions. 
By Prof. E. B. Warman, the well-known 
lecturer and authority on physical cul- 
ture. Price 10 cents. 



No. 142— Physical Training: 
Simplified. 

By Prof . E. B. Warman. A complete, 
thorough and practical book where the 
whole man is considered— brain and 
body. Price 10 cents. 



SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



No. 185— Health Hints. 

By Prof. E. B. Warman. Health in- 
fluenced by insulation; health influ- 
enced by underwear; health influenced 
by color; exercise. Price 10 cents. 

No. 213—285 Health Answers. 

By Prof. E. B. Warman. Contents: 
ventilating a bedroom; ventilating a 
house; how to obtain pure air; bathing; 
salt water baths at home; a substitute 
for ice water; to cure insomnia, etc., 
etc. Price 10 cents. 



No. 23S— Muscle Building. 

By Dr. L. H. Gulick. A complete 
treatise on the correct method of 
acquiring strength. Illustrated. Price 
10 cents. 



No. 234— School Tactics and 
Maze Running. 
A series of drills for the use of schools. 
Edited by Dr. Luther Halsey Gulick. 
Price 10 cents. 



No. 261— Tensing Exercises. 

By Prof. E. B. Warman. The "Ten- 
sing" or "Resisting" system of mus- 
cular exercises is the most thorough, 
the most complete, the most satisfac- 
tory, and the most fascinating of sys- 
tems. Price 10 cents. 



IV o. 285— Health; by Muiei- 
lar Gymnastics. 

With hints on right living. By W. J. 
Cromie. If one will practice the exer- 
cises and observe the hints therein 
contained, he will be amply repaid fox 
so doing. Price 10 cents. 

No. 288— Indigestion Treated 
by Gymnastics 

By W. J. Cromie. If the hints there- 
in contained are observed and the 
exercises faithfully performed great 
relief will be experienced. Price 10 
cents. 



No. 290— Get 
Well. 



Well; Keep 



By Prof. E. B. Warman, author of a 
number of books in the Spalding Ath- 
letic Library on physical training. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 325— Twenty Minute Ex- 
ercises. 

By Proi. E. B. Warman, with chap- 
ters c>n " How to Avoid Growing Old," 
and "Fasting; Its Objects and Bene- 
fits." Price 10 cents. 

Xo. 330— Physical Training; 
for the School and Class 

Room, 

Edited by G. R. Borden, Physical 
Director of the Y. M. C. A., Easton, Pa. 
A book that is for practical work in 
the school room. Illustrated. Prict 
10 cents. 



A. G. SPALDING 

From Photograph Taken in Sax Francisco 
in November, 1879 



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S c PAL c DItKG'S 

J1THLETIC LIBRARY 

Group L fftCo. / 





Spalding's Official 
Base Ball Guide 



88 




thirty -fourth Year 

1910 




OO 
OO 




"aUK" 






(Sdited by 






JOHN: S FOSTER 






ylmerican Sports 'Publishing 
Company 

21 Warren Street, 2\£eu? York 





Copyright, 1910 

BY 

American Sports Publishing Company 
New York 



Contents PAGE 

Ac G. Spalding Trophy 322 

American League Averages, Official 314 

American League Season of 1909 85 

Annual Meetings — 

American League 889 

National League 389 

Attendance in 1909 285 

Base Ball Playing Rules, Official 353 

Index to Playing 385 

Ready Reference Index to 350 

Base Ball Playing Rules, Spalding's Simplified — 

Ball 339 

Ball Ground 338 

Balls, Providing 340 

Balls, Soiling 340 

Base Running Rules 345 

Bat, Regulation 339 

Batting Rules 343 

Benches, Players' 339 

Coaching Rules 347 

Definitions, General 349 

Field for Play, Fitness of 340 

Field Rules 340 

Game, Regulation 341 

Gloves and Mitts, Regulation 339 

Ground Rules 348 

Innings, Choice of 340 

Players, Number and Position of 340 

Players, Substitute 340 

Pitching Rules ■ 341 

Scoring Rules 349 

Scoring of Runs 348 

Umpire's Authority 349 

Umpire's Duties 348 

Uniforms 339 

Base Ball Writers' Association 19- 

Dead of 1909 292 

Diagram, Correct, of a Ball Field 352 

Editorial Comment 9 

Introduction 5 

National Association of Professional Base Ball Leagues— 

American Association 137 

Blue Grass League 263 

California State League 266 



National Association of Professional Base Ball Leagues — (Con.) — page 

Carolina Association 259 

Central Association 243 

Central Kansas League 255 

Central League 201 

Connecticut League.. 175 

Eastern Carolina League 235 

Eastern League 145 

Illinois-Missouri League 231 

Indiana-Illinois-Iowa League 191 

Kansas State League 239 

Minnesota- Wi scon sin League 275 

New England League.. 171 

New York State League 187 

Northern Indiana League 205 

Northwestern League 197 

Ohio and Pennsylvania League 217 

Ohio State League 249 

Pacific Coast League 151 

Pennsylvania- West Virginia League 280 

South Atlantic League 221 

Southern Association 157 

Southern Michigan League 251 

Texas League 207 

Tri-State League 181 

Virginia League 227 

Western Association 212 

Western League 163 

Western Canada League 268 

Wisconsin-Illinois League 271 

National League Averages, Official 307 

National League Championship Campaign of 1909 73 

National League Season of 1909 55 

New National League President 7 

Official Club Rosters 333 

Organized Base Ball for the Schools 321 

Pennant Winners in 1909 283 

Pitchers' Records as Base Ball Experts View Their Formulation 21 

Presidents Day at Chicago 51 

Schedules for 1910 390 

Unveiling of Chadwick Monument 295 

University of Wisconsin vs. Japan 303 

Victorian Base Ball League, Australia 301 

Wonderful Prophecy Quickly Realized 43 

World's Championship Series of 1909 105 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 5 

Introduction 

In many ways the Base Ball season of 1909 was a shower of 
sunbeams for all those who were connected with its transition. 

Prosperity shone from an unclouded sky. It enveloped alike 
the major leagues and the minor leagues. There were some clubs 
which were less fortunate than their neighbors, but it will be dif- 
ficult to expect anything better, no matter how long continued our 
competitions for national and local championships. 

Even the less lortunate were not so unfortunate as some clubs 
had been in seasons prior, which is not only encouraging but a cer- 
tain index of the steady progress which Base Ball is making toward 
that standard where its fixed values will be in excess of its 
probabilities. 

From an artistic standpoint it is rather difficult to discrimin- 
ate accurately as to evolution. There are some w T ho maintain that 
the Base Ball of the present is better than that of the past. It is 
doubtful if this can be thoroughly proved. It is a presumptuous task 
on the part of anybody to attempt to prove it. 

There are too many attendant features to be considered when- 
ever one becomes reminiscent, and more than that not all of us 
are in position where we can be reminiscent with accuracy, for 
there are comparatively few of the modern school who were spec- 
tators of the Base Ball which was played in the '70's. 

One quality may well be attributed to the Base Ball of 1909, 
as well as to that of 1876, and that is the pleasure afforded to 
those who witnessed the contests. We have no record that en- 
thusiasm was less plentiful some thirty years ago. On the con- 
trary, it seems that the Base Ball of those days was welcomed 
with as much spontaneous approval as that of a more recent 
period, and after all what test is there to be devised which shall 
be more comprehensive? The "fan" of the '70's, with all his 
enthusiasm, was not more demonstrative than the "fan" of the 
'90's, and those of both periods attest their love for the game by 
the devotion with which they follow it, and one human being can 
ask no more of another. 

The realities of Base Ball have increased enormously in value. 
Permanency to the sport has been appreciated by those who are 
sponsors for it. They have been generous in outlay for the crea- 
ture comfort of the spectators. They should be. It is a matter of 
mutual respect. The better the conveniences the greater the at- 
tendance. The greater the attendance the better the conveniences. 
It works both ways. 

Millions of dollars are invested in Base Ball where the sum 
was once denotled by thousands. These millions of dollars by no 
possibility can be considered unwise investment and expenditure. 
The glorious amusement which is afforded to more than 60,000,000 
persons during the outdoor season is one of the finest pleasures of 
our modern civilization. 

This, too, is to be considered solely as the spectacular and ex 
hibitive side of the sport, for not less than one-third of the total 
population of the republic derives fully as much pleasure in par- 
ticipating in the game in some capacity or another as amateurs. 

The outlook for the season of 1910 is better than that of 1909. 
If the signs are not misleading there will be more and as fine Base 
Ball as there was last Summer. There is absolutely nothing in sight 
at the present time which would warrant the prediction of anything 
but multiplying successes, and the individual who makes any effort 
to upset such capital conditions is an enemy to the grandest sport in 
the world and a peevish foe to his own fellow beings. 




THOMAS J. LYNCH, 

President of the National League. 



SrALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 7 

New National League President 

Each year the National League of Professional Base Ball Clubs 
elects its president. The choice in 1909 fell upon Thomas J. 
Lynch of New Britain, Conn., after a deadlock of nearly a week, 
four clubs of the league having voted for John Montgomery Ward 
and four for R. B. Brown of Louisville, Ky. 

The name of Mr. Lynch was suggested by John T. Brush of the 
New York National League Club, and his selection to the position 
was unanimous. Other candidates were considered, but by an 
implied agreement four members' of the league had expressd a 
willingness to vote for a candidate whom Mr. Brush should name, 
except John Montgomery Ward. 

When the election of Mr. Lynch was announced to the public 
there came to him from the far away Pacific Slope a telegram 
of congratulation, which, he said, pleased him more than any 
other, and which he would have framed to hang in his office. 
It read as follows : 

"I extend my congratulations to the new president of 
the old National League ; also the old secretary, Mr. 
Heydler. You are a good team. .. . _, M 

*'A. G. Spalding.-" 

Thomas J. Lynch is the seventh man to be elected to the 
presidency of the National League. He is a native of New Britain 
and is fifty-one years of age. 

In 1885 he was connected with the New England League. In 
1886 he became an umpire in the Eastern League. The clubs, 
which comprised the circuit of the Eastern League that year were 
Jersey City, Newark, Bridgeport, Hartford, Meriden, Providence, 
Waterbury and Long Island. 

Mr. Lynch made his debut with the Providence club in the 
Eastern League The opponents of Providence were the Hartfords. 
His first game was a fourteen-inning contest. 

The next year he was with the New England League. In 1888 
he accepted an appointment in the National League as 1 umpire 
and remained with that organization until 1899. He withdrew 
from the National League because the players were becoming 
too abusive and were not held in check by owners as he thought 
they should have been. 

He retired to his residence in New Britain, Conn., where he 
remained as manager of a local theater until he received a call 
to act as president of the National League, a position which he 
accepted without hesitation when the circumstances of his selec- 
tion were explained to him. 

So far as Mr. Lynch's Base Ball experience is concerned only 
praise of his work' as an umpire may be emphatically repeated. 
In the politics of the game he never had a share. In the con- 
struction of the game he took no part. There was no occasion 
for him to do so. 

His firmness, fairness and sense of the fitness of things' are 
three qualities which commended him to the owners of the 
National League clubs as their selection for a president. Without 
attempting to be nrophetic as to the future it may safely be 
understood from the start that Mr. Lynch will insist on rigid 
adherence to propriety on the field on the part of the players, and 
no owner, whether Be be the head of a first division club or of 
a second division club, will find the new president in any manner 
inclined to be conciliatory where he thinks that the rights of the 
public have been disregarded. 




JOHN A. HEYDLER, 
Secretary-Treasurer National League. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 9 

Editorial Comment 

By John B. Foster. 

To those who make a study of Base Ball 
^^ in its various phases the editor of the Guide 

TlllS Year's takes much pleasure in referring the splendid 

Work symposium which has been received from the 

critics of the United States in regard to a 
better system for arriving at a satisfactory 
gradation of the pitchers. 

It has long been held that the method which has been in vogue 
has not been comprehensive enough to include all the details 
which are part of a pitcher's work. To obtain a perfectly accurate 
standard it is evident that everything which is done by a pitcher 
should be taken into consideration in ranking him for the year 
among his fellows. 

There is not a reply which has been received by the editor of 
the Guide in reference to this matter but is full of interest and 
perusal of the separate communications will be time valuably 
employed. 

From them it is to be hoped that a method shall be evolved 
which shall be agreed upon throughout the United States in 
general. It is possible that it would not be out of place to incor- 
porate it among thei scoring rules, in view of the fact that such 
action would result in uniformity of averages throughout the 
world. 

It has been felt that some of the pitchers who have really done 
good work for various clubs in the United States never have 
shone as brightly as they should, or were as fairly treated as 
they deserved, because they were not given credit for the value 
of their work in full measure. A new system will go far toward 
doing away with this unfairness. 

In the city of Trenton, N. J., on Saturday, 

There Cail't July 17 > 1909, there was a noteworthy cele- 

Ha rr< AA nffn*»i« bration in which the moral force attached to 

* SnlT Base Bal1 — a foundation stone by the way of 

Of TlllS the Base Ball structure — was given a demon- 

stration unlike any in the history of the game 
throughout the United States. 

The occasion was tho formal opening of the second season of 
the Trenton Municipal Base Ball League for boys between the 
ages of eight and sixteen years. Fifteen hundred boys in full 
base ball uniform paraded the streets for an hour. Two of the 
clubs of the league subsequently played on the public playground 
before a crowd of several thousand persons. The principal streets 
were thronged to see the parade, and many of the business houses 
were decorated in honor of the boys. 

The action of the council of the city of Trenton, which has been 
the sponsor for this municipal league, is one of the most com- 
mendable efforts made in recent years by a city of a lesser grade 
to provide amusement for the boys during the summer time. 
More and more the cities of our splendid country are beginning 
to realize that the boy is a part of the social obligation to the 
world, and is not merely to be "tolerated," as has been too often 
the case in the past. He is a factor, whose present is of the 
utmost importance, as he is laying the ground work of the future. 




1, Adams; 2, Trainer; 3, Abbaticchioc 4, Leach; 5, Phillippe< 6, 
Gibson; 7, Hyatt; 8, Leever; 9, Shelton; 10, Moore; 11, Leifield; 12, 
Wilson; 13, O'Connor; 14, Abstein; 15, H. Camnitz; 16, Willis; 17, 
Fred Clarke, Mgr. ; 18, Wagner; 19, Miller; 20, Maddox; 21, Simon; 
22, Frock; 23, Brandom; 24, Byrne; 25, Powell; 26, Camnitz (sub). 
Copyright, 1909, by Pittsburg Athletic Club; photo by R. W. Johnston. 

THE PITTSBURG TEAM— WORLD'S CHAMPIONS. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. H 

The city council of Trenton appropriated a sum to give the 
boys Base Ball during the summer months. That was in 1908. 
It proved to be a great success. The council appropriated money 
for another season in 1909, which was more of a success. The 
City Magistrates report that juvenile crime was practically wiped 
off the calendar during the summers of 1908 and 1909, and attrib- 
ute much of the clean life of the city to the fact that the boys 
were so busy with their Base Ball nines- that they had no oppor- 
tunity to get into mischief. 

Almost 150 uniformed clubs were organized by the boys in 
Trenton. There were a dozen playing fields on which they hold 
their games. Contests took place every afternoon except Sunday. 
It needed about seventy contests each week to get through the 
schedule. There were four sections of the league — the primary, 
made up of boys from 8 to 10 ; the midgets, with an age limit 
of 12 years ; the intermediate league, with boys between 12 and 
14, and the junior league, made up of boys who are under 16 
years of age. The entire scheme is under the control of a Play- 
ground Commission, which is appointed by the Mayor. 

Within the past two years there has been 

One Word a noticeable tendency, even though it J)e 

f slight, to obtrude too prominently the com- 

v mercial side of Base Ball upon the public. It 

Warning is not out of place in the Guide to remind 

those who are connected with the greatest 

national pastime in the world that it is a sport. It is not an 

exhibition. It is in no sense a show. It cannot be handled like 

stocks and bonds', nor sold like the merchandise of the market. 

The average Base Ball enthusiast cares little or nothing for the 
business side of the game and is inclined to resent any effort to 
place it before him. He is willing to contribute to the success 
of the team which he favors. He esteems that to be his privilege, 
but he resents any implied theory that he is 1 to take his Base Ball 
whether he likes it or not. 

Personal disagreements between owners of clubs of importance 
are likely to occur. They have occurred in the past, and there is 
nothing which would indicate that the future is to be freed of 
them, but when these disagreements lead to personal abuse, Base 
Ball as a sport is injured. 

Nothing is gained by airing differences of opinion in public when 
those differences are not based on sport alone. The high standard 
which has been established by professional Base Ball in the United 
States — -there is no professional sport in all the world which is 
so high class and so ably managed — must not be jeopardized for 
a moment by the contrariness of an individual. 

One of the remarkable growths in organized 
The Base Ball has been that of the National Asso- 

lVaiinnal ciation of Minor Leagues. 

**«"JMJJ* At the present time this Association con- 

ASSOCiatlOIt trols Base Ball in 256 cities and some day will 

control it in twice that number. There are 

more than 7,000 players under its jurisdiction. Its leagues will 

number more than thirty in all probability in 1910. 

The property interests of the association are valued at more 
than $20,000,000, and more than 24.000,000 spectators are reported 



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SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 13 

to have patronized the games of the various leagues comprising 
the Association during the season which is past. 

Twenty years ago minor ieague Base Ball was farcical com- 
pared with such a showing as the above. The minor leagues which 
were then successful could be counted on the fingers of one hand. 
Those which survived the Fourth of July were congratulated and 
respected by the major leagues. 

Occasionally there is a tendency to ascribe this present success 
of the minor leagues to their individual effort. That hardly appears 
to be the proper solution of their prosperity. When this present 
Association was organized it was all but impossible to induce many 
of the minor league owners to join it. Some of them almost had to 
be led to the meeting. . 

They could not have built up such a structure as they now 
possess were it not for the co-operation and the sincere co-operation 
of the major leagues. The latter have an asset which the minor 
leagues never can hope to have in such large measure — the con- 
gestion of population, which is wholly in favor of the National 
and American leagues. 

What has made the National Association such a wonderful 
working body and such a power for good in our great national 
pastime is that it is a part of Organized Base Ball. There is the 
keynote to success in the game. Organize, stick to organization, 
abide by the rules of the organization, and success follows. 

Work independently, without regard to rule, and ruin is inevi- 
table and ruin will assuredly pull down the walls of the weaker 
organizations first. 

As a whole the ball players of the major 
Exemplary leagues in 1909 conducted themselves with 
rnndnrt more propriety than they had in some sea- 

yuiiuuti sons. It did not detract from the game. 

Of Players It would appear that some of our managers 
and leading players are beginning to perceive 
that Base Ball gets along better if there is less friction between 
the principals of the field. The suspensions for poor deportment 
during games were fewer than they had been in the past. Now 
and then there was a manager or a captain who lost his temper 
because of a decision and was sent to the clubhouse. Unfortun- 
ately we have not obtained a staff of umpires who are infallible. 
It is not likely that we ever shall. It undoubtedly is very exasper- 
ating to the captain of a team to hear an umpire make an incorrect 
decision and realize that it may lose the game for his club. Yet 
for the good of Base Ball the captain who is a witness to that 
sort of thing must learn to control himself so that he shall not De 
removed from the field. His absence from his team, especially if 
it should happen to be prolonged, is likely to prove more costly 
than the loss of a single game. 

The work of the umpires, as a rule, in 1909 was fair. The 
standard never has been so high that it cannot be higher. One 
or two of the umpires were guilty of talking back to the players. 
There can be little mistake in this statement, as reports have been 
received from too many sources to admit that it can be wrong. 

It is to be hoped that the presidents of both of the major leagues, 
and of the minor leagues as well, will instruct their umpires that 
they must refrain from conduct similar to that for which players 
are disciplined. An umpire who talks back to a player and then 
removes the latter from the field after he has baited him, is as 
guilty as the player and should be made to suffer as severe 
punishment. 




1, John B. Foster, editor Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide and 
sporting editor of the Evening Telegram, New York; 2, Frank C. 
Kichter, editor Sporting Life, Philadelphia; 3, Joseph M. Cummings, 
editor Sporting News, St. Louis. 
THREE MEMBERS OF THE BASE BALL WRITERS' ASSOCIATION. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 15 

Only a little more than one year ago Mr. 

The Future A. G. Spalding, in conversation with the editor 

fnt^rnntinnnl of tne Guide, predicted the wonderful building 

« ?* boom in Base Ball which has been so much in 

Pastime evidence the past season, and which is of such 

importance that attention has been called to 

it in a special article in this issue. 

It is doubtful if any of us imagined that Mr. Spalding's prophecy 
would be realized so quickly. It may be possible that the predic- 
tion, which he made with such conciseness, so impressed itself upon 
owners of Base Ball clubs that they lost whatever hesitancy they 
may have entertained about branching out elaborately. 

In any event, the magnificent pavilions which Tiave been built 
from the Mississippi River to the Atlantic Ocean are substantial 
evidence as to the soundness of Mr. Spalding's position, and some 
Will sHortly be followed by even more magnificent structures. 

This year, in reviewing the work of the season which was con- 
cluded in October, and after a thorough review of the situation in 
general, Mr. Spalding has again essayed to be prophetic, and his 
prediction is even more forcible and more remarkable than that 
of 1909. 

Seated at his desk one afternoon, in his characteristic manner 
he paused abruptly while conversing upon the subject which 
demanded his immediate attention, and said impressively : "The 
day is not far distant when Base Ball will be the international 
sport of the world. Mark well what I say. You have reminded 
me that I prophesied the widespread building era of clubs and club 
owners'. I am now willing to go further than that — away beyond, 
in fact. It may sound like Yankee boasting to other nations, but 
I repeat that the day is not far distant when Base Ball will be 
the international sport of the globe." 

How far is Mr. Spalding from seeing realized the truth of his 
utterances? We have Base Ball in Australia, in Japan, in the 
Philippines, in Great Britain, in the West India islands, in Mexico, 
in Central America, in New Zealand", in Canada, in Italy, and in 
the Sandwich Islands. 

It is a pastime which is bound to spread into Asia from Japan 
and the Philippines. Chinese students who are in the United 
States acquiring a collegiate education nave informed the editor 
of the Guide that they are determined to take the game home 
with them. Some are at Yale and some at other of the larger 
institutions of the East, and all of them are enthusiastic over 
Base Ball and sanguine that their companions at home will like 
it after they have tried it. "If the Japanese students can play 
the game, so can we," said one of the Chinese students one after- 
noon. 

The visit of the United States fleet to Australia gave greater 
incentive to our national pastime in that part of the globe, because 
the Australians were given the benefit of practical Base Ball as 
Americans play it. 

It is said that down in the South Sea islands there are residing 
Americans who, isolated from home for the time being, have 
taught the natives some of the rudiments of the game and expect 
to convert them into excellent players. Away to the North, in 
Alaska, when the miners have a day of relaxation, and the cold 
is not too intense, they try a little Base Ball, even if it does verge 
a great deal on "two old cat," for exercise. This great big Amer- 
ican game of ours is rapidly putting a belt around the globe, and 
if the prophecy of Mr. Spalding is not realized quite so quickly 
as that which related to the improvement of Base Ball parks, it 
is not out of the question to imagine that it will come true within 
the lives of the present generation of Base Ball players. 




1, Sam Crane, New York Evening- Journal; 2, James R. Price, Sport- 
ing Editor New York Press; 3, George 0. Tidden, New York Morning 
World; 4, Herman Nickerson, Sporting Editor Boston Journal; 5, 
Jacob C. Morse, Base Ball Magazine, Boston; 6, T. H. Murnane, 
Boston Globe. 

A GROUP OF NEW YORK AND BOSTON MEMBERS OF THE 
BASE BALL WRITERS' ASSOCIATION. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 17 

"We have the testimony of ball players that 
. they prefer the present model of spikes to 

Concerning anything which has been invented to take 

Spikes their place. More than that, we have the 

testimony of manufacturers that they are 

only too willing to make another device if 

some one will produce the model, which shall commend itself as 

practical and safe. 

So it still appears to be "up to the inventors" to find an ap- 
pliance which shall be better than the spike of the present time. 

In spite of the fact that many players have been injured by 
the use of the spike which is now generally attached to the shoes 
which are worn on the ball field, professionals who are engaged 
in the game daily find; that other patterns which they have used 
do not ensure them safely against sprained ankles or tendons. 
The present spike holds firmly in the ground. All devices 4 which 
have been manufactured to take its place are inclined to slip 
when the metals become clogged with earth. 

Unquestionably a better and safer spike would be welcomed 
and there is opportunity for the ingenious man to bring it to the 
surface. The spike in its present shape is a menace to limb and 
has proved a heavy drawback financially to ball clubs. The losses 
which have been incurred by having important players injured by 
spiking at critical stages of races for the championship amount 
to thousands of dollars. 

There is not the slightest objection to a new spike if some 
one shall invent it. The first man who is clever enough to invent 
the successful spike may not make a fortune, but there is reason 
to believe that he will be amply recompensed for the trouble 
to which he has gone. 

To the thousands of readers of Spalding's 

The Official Base Ball Guide the editor cor- 

FTiiirtli dially and with delight introduces in this 

tit * * issue the faces of three score and more able 

Estate men who have built for the good of the sport 

fully as thoroughly in their way as the players 
and the owners of the clubs. 

Make the acquaintance of the members of the Base Ball Writers' 
Association ! You will find them true blue. Probably there is 
not one of them whom some have not criticised in one week and 
praised in the next. It is' part of their sad lot. That is why the 
editor of the Guide wishes to make them generally acquainted all 
over the world. 




1, Purves T. Knox, Mail; 2, Bozeman Bulger, Evening World; 3, J. 
Karpf, Mail: 4, Harry H. Nieineyer, Globe. 

A GROUP OF NEW YORK MEMBERS OF THE BASE BALL 
WRITERS' ASSOCIATION. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 19 

Base Ball Writers* Association 

During the season of 1908 plans were laid for the formation 
of the Base Ball Writers' Association of the United States. There 
was no motive in this organization other than securing general 
conveniences for the men who are detailed from dav to day by 
the great newspapers of the United States to report 'the accounts 
of Base Ball games. 

Without any reason, some assigned as a cause for the formation 
of the organization a wish to secure a monopoly on Base Ball 
affairs. How this could be obtained is something which is quite 
beyond the ken ot the editor of the Guide. Waiting reports of 
Base Ball games, like everything else which pertains to the 
national game, is largely a survival of the fittest. 

The object, of the Associaion, far from having any monopolistic 
tendency, was tc secure creature comfort at the Base Ball parks. 
As our wonderful pastime has increased in importance it has 
congested its stands with humanity, until the men who were 
assigned to work by newspapers were fairly crowded out of their 
quarters. Not only did visiting newspaper men suffer, but the 
local newspaper reporters arrived at grounds only to find that 
an outsider had taken space which was reserved for them, and 
refused to surrender it without an unpleasant argument. Some of 
them did not surrender it. 

It was held that if the newspaper writers organized and placed 
before the owners their necessities, with a declaration that they 
would be responsible for their own members in each city of the 
major circuits, the press stands would no longer be the rendezvous 
of thoSe to whom they were not eligible. 

The Association was formed, the experiment tried for a year, 
and the editor believes that it is the unanimous opinion of "Base 
Bali writers, including those who travel as well as those who are 
located permanently in one city, that the facilities never were so 
good as they were in the year 1909. Hence the Association has 
been perpetuated. 

At its last annual meeting in New York, Joe S. Jackson of 
the Detroit Free Press was re-elected president and "Jack" Ryder 
of the Cincinnati Enquirer vice-president. William G. Weart of 
the Philadelphia Evening Telegraph was re-elected secretary, and 
T. H. Murnane of the Boston Globe treasurer. At the request of 
Mr. Murnane it was decided to consolidate the offices of secretary 
and treasurer, and Mr. Weart now holds both. The board of 
directors of the Association is composed of Paul Shannon of the 
Boston Post, I. E. Sanborn of the Chicago Tribune and the editor 
of the Guide. 

Desiring to make the first pictorial compilation of the Base Ball 
writers of the United States, most of whom are members of the 
Association, as complete as possible, the editor of the Guide worked 
earnestly to make the collection during the winter. It was his 
hope that all would respond. A few were too modest or perhaps 
a little forgetful. However, most of the Association is represented 
in this issue of the Guide. 




1, J. N. Wheeler, Herald; 2, George E. First brook; 3, W. A. Ptaelon. 
Morning Telegraph; 4, W. J. McBeth, American; 5, Mart Roth, 
Globe. 

A GROUP OF NEW YORK MEMBERS OF THE BASE BALL 
WRITERS' ASSOCIATION. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 21 

Pitchers' Records as Base Ball Experts 
View Their Formulation 

Modern Base Ball has introduced some features into the pas- 
time which were less common in the days of the past. There 
never has been any legal objection to the relief of a 'pitcher, 
if his delivery were not baffling to the batters, but the new school 
of managers rushes pitchers to the front whenever there is a 
slight indication of wavering. The result is many pitchers for 
few games, and great difficulty in always accrediting" the pitching 
talent, as it seems to deserve, in the matter of actual work in a 
playing season. 

A new method is needed. To that end the editor of the Guide 
addressed queries to the Base Ball critics of the United States, 
asking their opinions in the matter. Replies have been many and 
cheerfully forwarded. To the newspaper fraternity, always^ well 
disposed and filled with the spirit of good cheer and kindness, the 
editor of the Guide takes occasion to extend his thanks. The 
letter addressed to the writers is as follows : 

The present system of crediting pitchers' for the 
season is wholly inefficient and at fault. Under the 
rules now in vogue, where more than one pitcher is 
likely to be used by each team in a game, an effort has 
been made to try establish some standard on the basis 
of games won. 

Officials of both of the major leagues say they 
consider that plan entirely unsatisfactory. It tells 
very little as to the actual worth of a pitcher's serv- 
ices to the team during the year. 

In as few words as possible will you advance your 
ideas as to what seems a satisfactory and better 
method than the present to estim'ate the work of 
pitchers and rate them according to their actual per- 
formances? 
To this request replies were received as follows' : 
WILLIAM B. HANNA, New York Sun. 

"The matter is one which, I think, should be left to the judgment of the 
official scorer, he to consider carefully all the circumstances. It would 
be difficult to find a hard and fast rule to govern the point." 

HARRY NIEMEYER, New York Globe. 

"We respectfully suggest that the question be left always to the official 
scorer in each park, so that he can place all the blame upon the pitcher 
he personally dislikes." 

J. J. KARPF, New York Mail. 

"The change suggested has long been necessary. Unless the score is 
abnormally large when a pitcher retires from the game, say in the first 
three innings, he should not get all the credit for the victory. On the 
other hand, how quickly do the compilers of records charge a pitcher 
with defeat if he pitches in only one inning. Say he relieves a pitcher 
in the last inning, his team being one run to the good. Then, through no 
fault of his, the opposing side 'flukes' through with a victory. The pitcher, 
who worked in only one inning, is credited with defeat. The present rule 
does not work both ways. 

"If a pitcher retires from the game after pitching four innings and his 
team has a big lead, which is maintained to the end, he surely should 
get credit for the victory." 




1, Sid Mercer, Globe: 2, John Pollock. Evening World; 6, A. Yager, 
Brooklyn Eagle; 4, L. F. Wooster, Brooklyn Times. 
A GROUP OF GREATER NEW YORK MEMBERS OF THE BASE 
BALL WRITERS' ASSOCIATION. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 23 

"W. A. FBCEIiON, New York Morning* Telegraph. 

'•It is almost impossible to make up a tabulated form-card of pitching 
records so as to make them express their genuine value or the relative 
ability of the slabmen, owing to the different strength of the teams behind 
them. Jones, pitching for the eighth place club, may be lucky if, after 
doing magnificent work, he wins 400 per cent of his games on the season, 
while Smith, pitching for the champions, may win 700 per cent of his 
games through the great club backing him, even though he is really a far 
inferior pitcher than Jones. 

"Here are a few ideas which may help a little: 

"The difference between the percentage scored by any team for the 
season and the percentage of victories won by a pitcher would be inter- 
esting. For example, we will suppose that a team wins 625 pe.r cent of 
the season's games. Jones wins 722 per cent of his games, and is, there- 
fore, 97 per cent better than his team strength. Brown wins 519 per cent, 
and is therefore 106 points inferior to the average strength of the team. 

"Another idea: 

"Runs per game scored off a pitcher. A glance over the records as now 
kept will show that many a pitcher allowed fewer runs per game, even 
when with a losing team, than other fellows who won a bigger percentage 
of victories, the records, therefore, plainly showing that the stronger 
teams helped their pitchers. A man who won only 400 per cent of games, 
yet allowed only 3.5 runs per game, with a weak team behind him, would 
then show better class than some fellow who, winning 600 per cent with a 
strong club, still allowed 4.25 runs to the game." 

PUBVES T. KNOX, New York Mail. 

"In my opinion the best thing to do is to follow the unwrittea rule 
in the matter. According to this, if a pitcher pitches good ball for a 
few innings, and his team gains a winning lead and he is taken out the 
first twirler should be credited w r ith the victory; if in a tight place in a 
game the pitcher is taken out after he has done good work, to permit a 
pinch hitter to bat for him, and the run thus scored proves to be the 
winning tally, he should be credited with the victory; if a pitcher twirls 
more than half of the game and is replaced while his team enjoys a 
short lead and his team eventually wins he should be credited with the 
victory; in the event of a tie game the succeeding pitcher is credited with 
the victory or defeat as the case may be. 

"To some the last rule appears unfair in some instances. For example 
if a home club pitcher pitches nine or ten innings and the score is tied : 
but he is taken out to permit a pinch hitter to bat, as there appears to 
be a chance to score, and the pinch hitter fails to hit after the succeed- 
ing pitcher goes in, and the home club wjns. they believe the first twirler 
should be credited with the victory because of his good work. How- 
ever, if the home club had lost it would be decidedly unfair to credit 
the first man with the defeat. At times this rule may appear unjust, 
but it generally works its own salvation during each season." 

A. YAGER, Brooklyn Eagle. 

"I think the earned run rule should be resurrected to cover that point, 
allowing earned runs only on actual base hits. The won and lost column 
should stay." 

L. F. WOOSTIR, Brooklyn Times. 

"There should be a change in the method of crediting pitchers for 
their season's work and I would suggest that the records be kept the 
same as batting averages. Take the total number of batsmen that have 
faced a pitcher, subtract the number of hits, and then divide the former 
into the difference. Thus a pitcher who has been faced by 75 batters and 
allowed 15 hits would have a percentage of .800. The percentage of strike- 
outs, bases on balls and hit batsmen could be calculated in the same 
manner. While most of the men who now have high averages still would 
be on top, this system would give everyone an equal chance, no matter 
what the ability of those backing him up." 




1, Will B. Wreford, Free Press; 2. J. S. Smith. Journal- 3. Joe S. 
Jackson, Free Press; 4, Paul H. Bruske, Times: 5, Jack F. Cremer, 
Journal. 

A GROUP OF DETROIT MEMBERS OF THE BASE BALL 
WRITERS' ASSOCIATION. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 25 

J. ED. GRILLO, Washing-ton Post. 

"No change in the present system of crediting pitchers with victories 
or charging them with defeats when two or more are used in a game 
has suggested itself to me which will eliminate the injustices which 
frequently result under the present system. It is my judgment that 
when such matters are determined by competent officials the pitchers 
get a square deal on the whole, and a fairly good idea of their actual 
performances is to be gained. There is no system which will ever give 
figures showing the actual value of a pitcher." 

PAUL W. EATON*, Washington Correspondent Sporting 1 Life. 

"I think that either runs earned by opponents, or base hits by opponents, 
would be the best measure of pitcher efficiency. Probably the first named 
is preferable." 

STEPHEN O. GRAUIiEY, Philadelphia Inquirer. 

"In summary of game give each pitcher's name, the number of men 
to whom he pitches, the hits and runs made off him, the inning in which 
he was taken out of the box or entered the game. The mere mentioning 
of the inning the pitcher either left the game, or entered it, would 
enable the public by a glance to tell just which pitcher was entitled to 
the victory and which pitcher should be charged with a defeat." 

GEORGE E. McliINN, Philadelphia Press. 

'"I most certainly think that Base Ball pitchers are not receiving the 
proper credit for their work under the present system. I would suggest 
that a twirler's work be averaged on the number of strike-outs he has, 
the number of bases on balls he allows, the number of hits the oppo- 
nents make off his delivery and the winning or losing of the game be 
made a secondary consideration. A batter who can hit .300, even though 
he is on a tail-end club, is not kept down to a .200 average because his 
fellow players don't help him win games. Why should a pitcher be made 
to suffer, in the eyes of the "fans" who peruse the averages, simply 
because his pitching, no matter how good, cannot win alone ? Averages 
based on the individual work of the twirler would encourage him and he 
would work twice as hard to win, no matter how bad his support was." 

HARRY NELLY, Cleveland Plain Dealer. 

"Personally, I am not very keen for figures. They show little of the 
real ability of a ball player, either as to fielding, pitching or hitting. 
They make interesting reading for hungry mid-winter fans and fill space 
in the sparse season. If it were possible to work out some percentage 
system based upon number of innings pitched, hits made and bases on 
balls given, it would tell more clearly the effectiveness of a pitcher than 
to compute his average on a basis of whether his team wins or loses. 

"Pitching is one-half a ball game, being the principal factor in the 
defense. If a ball club has a weak offense a lot of good pitching is 
wasted. St. Louis Nationals and Washington Americans present some 
pretty good examples of the injustice of the system now in vogue." 

M. P. PARKER, St. Louis Globe-Democrat. 

"Two things must be considered in handling the matter. One is to 
reach a correct conclusion as to each individual game, while the other is 
to show accurately the value of the work done during a season. 

"In handling single games the summary following box scores should be 
extended somewhat. At present the number of innings pitched, the number 
of hits and runs made and sometimes the number of batters out (this 
latter being automatically taken care of where fractional parts of innings 
are given in the first mentioned part of the summary), are given. Extend- 
ing this so as to show how many batters have been up and the location 
of any men on base would aid greatly in forming a correct idea of a 
pitcher's work in a single game. Grouping the hits, bases on balls and 
hit batsmen in The innings in which scoring is done would give a fair 




1, Hugh Stuart Fullerton, Examiner, 2, Harold D. Johnston, Record- 
Herald; 3, Irving E. Sanborn, Tribune; 4, William J. Veeck, 
American; 5, Ed Westlake Post. 

A GROUP OF CHICAGO MEMBERS OF THE BASE BALL 
WRITERS' ASSOCIATION. 



\ 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 27 

idea of pitching effectiveness, as it is keeping these separated or allowing 
them to bunch which makes the difference between good pitching and 
bad pitching. 

"As indicating the real merit of pitching during the season about the 
only way to get a correct estimate is to take a general average on the 
average number of hits, bases on balls, hit batsmen and strike-outs per 
game and modify this with the number of games pitched and won and 
lost. This latter must be taken into consideration because some pitchers 
with low averages in detail allow hits, passes and hit batters to bunch in 
one inning and are therefore deservedly losing pitchers." 

WILLIS E. JOHNSON, St. Louis Globe-Democrat. 

"Crediting pitchers for the season, as done at the present time, is indeed 
very inefficient. The only solution of the problem seems to lie in the 
fact of having a more complete record kept of the work done by twirlers 
for the entire season. 

"If, instead of as now doing, a record were kept of innings pitched, 
showing strike-outs, bases on balls, hits and runs allowed, it seems an 
average could be struck together with a table showing these facts which 
would undoubtedly prove more satisfactory and by far more interesting." 

BRICE HOSXINS, St. Louis Star. 

"As long as the practice is indulged in of permitting a team to use 
more than one pitcher in a game, it is apparent that the value of players 
in this particular department cannot be determined by using as a basis 
the number of games won and lost, as at present. 

"A pitcher's rating for the season should be established by the number 
of innings he works and his actual performance while in the game." 

WM. G. WE ART, Philadelphia Evening" Telegraph. 

"The averages of the pitchers should be made up on the same plan as 
the percentages of the teams. The latter are secured by adding the 
total number of games won and lost and dividing the total into the 
number of games won. For the pitchers, I would consider that each man 
who faces him be regarded as a chance. Give him credit for every 
chance that results in a put-out and charge him with a 'chance against' 
for every batsman who fails to be put out, unless the same was clearly 
not the fault of the pitcher. In this way, by adding the 'chances 
accepted' and the 'chances against' and dividing the total into the 
number of chances accepted, a percentage could be secured. 

"The chances recorded for the pitcher would thus be the number of 
men who were put out while he was pitching. The chances recorded 
against the pitcher should at least be every hit made off him, and 
every batsman who reaches first base on balls or by being hit by a 
pitched ball. I would also favor being charged against him every balk, 
every wild pitch and every sacrifice fly, although objection might be 
raised to these by fear of confusing the fans. Still, each is an evidence 
of lack of effectiveness of the pitcher. 

"Making the base hits, bases on balls, and hit by pitched balls as 
'chances against,' here is an illustration: 

"Smith pitches a full nine-inning game. Credit him with 27 'chances 
accepted.' The opposing team makes 7 hits, receives 2 bases on balls, 
and one batsman is hit by pitched ball, giving 10 'chances against.* 
Adding the 27 chances accepted and the 10 chances against, gives a 
total of 37, and 37 divided into 27 gives a percentage of .730. 

"In this way, a pitcher would receive credit for what he actually does, 
instead of his record depending almost entirely upon the work of his 
team mates." 

H. W. LANIGAN, St. Louis Times. 

"The present system of crediting the pitchers for the work they accom- 
plish, or don't accomplish, is a joke. The victories and defeats do not 
tell much, for the simple reason that all teams are not equal and the 
pitcher on the second division or tail-end team has not the chance to 




1, Harvey T. Woodruff, sporting editor Tribune; 2, James C. Gilruth, 
News; 3, R. W. Lardner, Tribune; 4, Richard G. Tobin, Inter-Ocean; 
5, George C. Rice, News; 6, Malcolm MacLean, Examiner. 

A GROUP OF CHICAGO MEMBERS OF THE BASE BALL 
WRITERS' ASSOCIATION. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 29 

win as often as the pitcher on the first division or championship team. 
The pitchers on the Pittsburg, Chicago (National League), New York 
(National League), Detroit and Philadelphia (American League) teams 
had much easier time winning than the pitchers on the tail-enders. Their 
teams not only won oftener, but put up a superior article of ball; had 
a better defense and the catching, too, as a rule was better. Rucker 
and Johnson are two of the greatest pitchers in the world, but what 
chance did they have to land up top? The records should be reduced to 
an angle where each pitcher will be credited with a percentage of runs, 
hits, strike-outs and walks allowed per inning. This may entail too much 
work to be practical." 

J. 3VI. CUMMING-S, Editor Sporting 1 News, St. Iiouis, Mo. 

"Games won and lost, bases on balls, hits by the pitcher, wild pitches, 
base hits and strike-outs are well enough, as far as they go, in a long- 
distance estimate of a pitcher's value and should not be eliminated from 
the standing records. If supplemented by two other standing records, 
'innings pitched' and what might be called 'pitcher's runs,' the informa- 
tion would be more definite and less likely to mislead. A pitcher may 
pitch a shut-out game and yet lose it. He may, on the other hand, allow 
a dozen runs and the heavy hitting of his team-mates procure him credit 
for a game won. But 'P.R.,' meaning pitchers' runs, would tell more 
of the tale. Base hits are no criterion always, for several hits may be 
allowed in each inning, forming a good-sized total, yet, in every instance, 
the one more hit needed may be prevented. 'P.R.' supplies the missing 
link. 'P.R.,' or runs for which the pitcher is entirely responsible, is not 
so hard to figure out as the game proceeds. Let's suppose the batter 
gets a start on a hit, four balls, a force, or a pitcher's error — in fact, 
anything for which the pitcher is responsible. If that man scores in any . 
way short of a fielding error that allows him to cross the plate, charge 
one "P.R.' If, on the other hand, perfect play would have resulted in 
his retirement at any station, eliminate him from the pitcher's account 
entirely. If he advances a base after reaching first by fielding errors 
connected with plays not made with the intention of putting him out, 
should he eventually score, whether a 'P.R.' should be charged must be 
figured out from what follows. For instance, suppose the batter starts 
on a single and reaches second on a bad throw-in. Should a- three-base 
hit follow, it would be a 'P.R.,' as the runner would have scored from 
first base anyway. Should, however, a single follow on which the runner 
scores, and the next batter make the third out, it should not be a 'P.R..' 
as had the runner first named been on first, he could not have crossed the 
plate before the inning ended. 

"This is very different from the earned-run table, whatever form of 
computing earned runs is used. Given the number of runs a pitcher 
really allowed to be scored solely on his delivery or his own fielding 
errors and the number of innings he pitched, at least some better con- 
clusion could be reached than is possible now." 

JACOB C. MORSE, Base Ball Magazine, Boston, Mass. 

"I cannot conceive of a plan different from the one that now prevails 
that will be any improvement thereon. The present method based on 
victories and defeats is as fair as any. It works hardships at times, but 
the man who has the endurance and the skill is generally there at the 
finish, and it is the man who cannot maintain the pace who is taken out 
and supplanted by another. The man who is there when the game is 
won is certainly entitled to all the credit and glory there is in figuring 
in a victory." 

AL E. WATTS, Boston Traveler. 

"I heartily agree with you that the present system is inefficient. The 
bettering of the system will not be an easy task, however. The mere 
fact that a team may bunch a few hits and score two or three runs and 
win behind a pitcher who has pitched only a half inning, while a fellow 
pitcher has twirled good enough ball to win for eight innings, even 
though his team is a run behind until he retires from the box to let a 




1. William G. Weart, Evening Telegraph; 2, James C. Isaminger, 
North American; 3, George E. McLinn, Press; 4, Joseph Estoclet, 
Evening Bulletin. 

A GROUP OF PHILADELPHIA MEMBERS OF THE BASE BALL 
WRITERS' ASSOCIATION. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 31 

pinch hitter bat, does not seem to be sufficient reason for the pitcher 
who pitches a half inning to get the credit for the game. However, it is 
just as hard to see how the credit can be given the first pitcher while 
the score was against him when he left the rubber. 

"The only way I see of solving the riddle is to abolish all set scoring 
rules governing the giving of credit and leave the issue with the official 
scorers at the various parks. Let their decisions be final. The official 
scorers may thus use their discretion and credit may be bestowed upon 
the deserving pitchers." 

HERMAN NICKERSON, Boston Journal. 

"It seems to me every pitcher working in a game should receive a 
share of the credit for winning and stand for a share of the responsibility 
for losing a game. 

"It is simply a question of addition of fractions or one of percentage, 
basing the scheme upon ninths, figuring each game as nine innings, all 
extra innings to be ninths also. The extra half of an inning, when the 
winning team"s pitcher, being at home, does not have to work, to count 
as a ninth, as if he had pitched. 

"For instance, three pitchers work in a nine-inning game and win for 
their team by a score of 9 to 0. The team winning: scores one run in 
each of the nine innings, three runs for each pitcher. Clearly each 
twirler is entitled to a share of the victory, yet under the present system 
the first pitcher gets the credit for the game. 

"If the work of the pitchers was figured the way I suggest, then every 
man sent to the mound would get his percentage of victory, or loss, and 
in the aggregate it would certainly tell more clearly than at present his 
true worth. 

"As an example of what I mean we will say pitchers A and B and C 
pitch in a winning game for Boston against pitchers D and E, who work 
for New York. Pitcher A works five innings and should get five-ninths 
of a victory. Pitcher B works two innings and gets the credit for two- 
ninths. Pitcher C works two innings, getting credit also for two-ninths. 

"Pitcher D was taken out in the eighth inning with the score against 
his team. I would credit him with an eight-ninths loss while giving 
Pitcher E one-ninth loss. This would be the same proposition if the score 
stood in his favor when pitcher D was taken out. 

"In the case where the pitcher 'blows up' and his team finds the score 
4 to 0, we will say, against him, the retiring pitcher leaving the game 
with men on bases in the first inning. He should get the credit for one- 
ninth loss of the game, even though the pitcher who relieved him gets 
eight-ninths loss credited to him. If the relieving pitcher pitched fine 
ball and his team won through a rally he gets credit for an eight-ninths 
victory. The man who started the game gets credit for one-ninth. 

"At first glance it is seen that this pitcher got eight-ninths credit for 
a loss against one-ninth for the man who 'blew up.' True, but in the 
course of a season's work these would equalize themselves and point as 
true as a sign post to the men who were entitled to front rank as 
twirlers. 

"When more than one pitcher is used by a team in a game why 
wouldn't it be a good idea to have a place in the summary set aside 
for the scorer to indicate the proportion of victory and loss to be credited 
the men pitching? 

"For example, in a game where the Boston pitcher twirled the full 
nine innings, winning, and two New York pitchers were used, B working 
four innings and C five innings, the summary should read: 

"A, for Boston, gets credit for winning; B, New York, four-ninths 
loss; C, New York, five-ninths loss." 

RALPH S. DAVIS, Pittsburg- Press. 

"I believe there should be no hard and fast rule, but that Common sense 
should prevail. I think the pitchers' records should show, as well as 
games participated in, games won and games lost, the number of times 
a twirler was relieved by another pitcher, and the number of times he 
relieved a team-mate. Suppose in the ninth inning the twirler who had 




1, Thoma3 D. Richter, Sporting Life, Philadelphia; 2. Paul W. 
Eaton, Washington correspondent Sporting Life: 3. Jay G. Thatcher, 
Evening Telegraph, Philadelphia: 4. J. Ed Grillo, Washington Post; 
5. Stephen O. Grauley, Philadelphia Inquirer. 

A GROUP OF PHILADELPHIA AND WASHINGTON MEMBERS OF 
THE BASE BALL WRITERS' ASSOCIATION. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 33 

worked the entire game should lose control or be hit hard, and the bases 
be failed. Another man is sent to the slab. The score is a tie at the time. 
Under the old rule, it is the relief pitcher's game to win or lose, the 
score being tied when he goes in. I think this is manifestly unfair to the 
second pitcher, and that the first man should have to stand for the game, 
no matter how it turns out. This will also apply under other conditions, 
but I think the ofiicial scorer should use his judgment in crediting wins 
and charging defeats." 

ANDREW M. ROWLEY, Assistant Night Editor Associated 
Press, Pittsburg", 

"I believe that a system of averages could be arranged that would give 
the exact status of a pitcher and show exactly what he has done. If it 
were possible to keep a record of the number of hits a pitcher allows, the 
number of bases on balls he gives, the number of men he hits, the number 
of men he strikes out. the number of wild pitches he makes, and in fact, 
a record of all those things which enter into the game from a pitcher's 
standpoint, and a way found to average these figures, that would, in my 
opinion, sbow exactly what a pitcher has done and how he compares with 
other slabmen. However, the present system of games won is, to my 
mind, better than any other we have had." 

E. M. THIERRY, Pittsburg Dispatch. 

"The trouble in the present system does not lie in the manner of 
arriving at a single pitcher's percentage in games won and lost, but in 
determining which man should receive the credit for the victory or be 
charged with the defeat when more than one twirler is used in a game. 
In a close game, where the score is tied when a new pitcher mounts the 
slab, the fans are often at a loss to determine which man dlserves the 
glory or the disgrace. 

"If a pitcher starts the game and is taken out, it is obvious that he 
is unable to stand the pace. Therefore, should his team be defeated 
it is evident that he deserves to be charged with the defeat, regardless 
of the nun be r of slabmen who succeed him. Had he been able to stand 
the pace al? would be well with his team, but his failure puts it in a hole 
and he should be the one to suffer. However, it is often the case that a 
pitchei is taken out to allow a stronger hitter to bat for him. The 
twirler who then takes the slab may be unable to do as well as his 
predecessor. It would then be up to the official scorer to differentiate 
between the man who is taken out, because his pitching was poor, and 
the man who is taken out simply because a stronger batter is required. 
If the pitcher who starts the game holds up his end in good shape and is 
relieved at a critical moment to allow a substitute to bat for him and 
the nex+ pitcher is unequal to the task of holding his opponents as well 
as his predecessor, then this second man should be charged with the 
defeat.'- 

RICHARD GUY, Pittsburg Gazette Times. 

"I can not think of any simple method of determining the worth of a 
pitchei better than the present system, unless one goes into many details. 
There is one point I think could be worked out satisfactorily. Suppose 
three men are on bases and nobody out, a new pitcher is sent in to 
relieve the man working. I feci it is an injustice to the new pitcher to 
be credited with a defeat when an error or a hit scores sufficient runs to 
win the game. The other pitcher put the men on bases. When in doubt 
I think the manager of the team should tell the official .scorers who is 
entitled to the victory or defeat. The manager knows the ability of his 
pitchers better than any other person in the park aside from those in 
the game." 

WILI. B. WREPORD, Detroit Pree Press. 

"Let the old rule stand, except where a pitcher leaves the box with 
the score tied, third base occupied and less than two out. Should this 
runner score and cost his team the gan,e, he should be given the defeat. 




1, David J. Davies, sporting editor Dispatch; 2, Andrew M. Rowley, 
Associated Press; 3, John H. Gruber, Gazette-Times; 4. Alfred R. 
Cratty, Pittsburg correspondent Sporting Life, Philadelphia; 5, Robert 
M. Chilton, Chronicle-Telegraph. 

A GROUP OF PITTSBURG MEMBERS OF THE BASE BALL 
WRITERS' ASSOCIATION. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 

Should the pitcher who relieved him prevent opponents from scoring- in 
- he should be credited with the victory. In all o oer 
let the official scorer use his judgment.*' 

JOE S. SMITH. Detroit Journal. 

- a pitcher full credit. I believe an average should be struck 
on his year's performance, taking into consideration innings pitched. 
on balls, strike-outs, wild pitches and hits off him by opposing batsmen. 
Such an average would be a true judge of a pitcher's worth." 

H. G. SAI.SIHGES, Detroit News. 

"The pitcher who relieves another should receive credit for the game if 
providing his team is behind or the score is tied when he goes 

"If the game is lost it should be recorded against the pitcher taken 
out. providing his team is behind or the w - .1 and ther- 

men _en he is relieved. Only when his team is ahead an 1 

l is tied with bases clear should the first pitcher be exempt : 
blame." 

JACK F. CBEMT1E, Detroit Journal. 

" is my opinion that pitchers should be classified according t : 

In each gam- - by the win and lose system. 

pitching is divided into eight classes, designated A. B, C 

nd H. If a pitcher lets the opposition down with a hi 

but few passes, bat lost through poor support, even though 

opposing pit ::eely batted, he could be credited with a 'B' : 

game, while the : dd be given a rating of k E* or TV 

a the preparations rf the final averages the classification eou~ 1 

iged and the pitchers ratel letual per- 

formances. This, of course, in addition to the standing of the pitchers 
by winning and loe 

7ie only objection that has been raised to this plan is that it pots It 
entirely up : ~-- iffieia] scorer. But I k not *onsidei Uric 
matter, as the question of all standings is to-day entirely in the hands 
era and all averages depend on the honesty of the scoring. 
I lie -.-.--- that the matter of crediting a win where two or more 
pitchers officiate in a game, and the loss also, should be left to the 
judgment of the scorer entire] 

PAUL H. BEUSZE. Detroit Times. 

valuable to his team, not in his ability to hold 
opponents to a low average of hits -imes 

won i ild therefore remain the most effective method of meas- 

a other data may be. 
:ermining the 
bility for defeat and the credit of victory. In many case 
is one of simple judgment and opinion. The one man qualified to del 
the verdict in such a case is the league's official scorer who may be on 
duty at the tin- ue wise and un v . 

opini: "her features of the game — and his appointment prr 

poses such — he should be the one on whose decision the league 

average- ic compiled." 

JIM C. HAMILTON, Cincinnati Commercial Tribune. 

- T believe that the preseni oy stent :f compiling the batting averages 
of the different players of the big leagues can hardly be improved upon. 
At least I have fa rnplaints during the last few years 

mode of getting at the batting worth of a player during a season by the 
?m now in vogue. Therefore would it not be wise to pattern the 
pitcher's record along the same line? The batter is charged with times 
at bat. number of hits he makes, with supplementary honors of bas- 
balls and reaching first base, no matter how. My idea Allow 




1, Richard Guy, Gazette-Times; 2, Ralph S. Davis, Press; 3. E. M. 
Thierry, Dispatch; 4, James F. McShane, Herald; 5, W. B. McVickar, 
Dispatch. 

A GROUP OF PITTSBURG MEMBERS OF THE BASE BALL 
WRITERS' ASSOCIATION. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 37 

the scorer to record the number of men that each pitcher pitches to. Also 
record the number of hits off of the pitcher and compile his average 
with these two sets of figures, just as one does with the two sets of 
figures for the batsman. Of course, the supplementary honors would be 
the games won and lost, players struck out, while the errors would be 
the bases on balls allowed, batsmen hit, etc. There is no denying the 
fact that this would be a rather intricate method compared to the present 
manner, that of simply counting the games won and lost. The inequality 
of the present system is shown very distinctly in a number of games in 
the National League last season when a pitcher was beaten, although 
holding his opponents to three and four hits, while the day after, another 
pitcher managed to win, although being hit to the extent of twelve 
safeties. As long as there are errors a pitcher's worth can not be 
ascertained through the system now in vogue." 

FRANK W. ROSTOCK, Cincinnati Post. 

"In regard to the matter of doping out pitchers' averages, I wish to 
say that I find this a very ticklish question. So many things enter into 
this question that I prefer to give it a little more thought. No system 
better than the one in use has suggested itself to me without bringing 
with it such a complicated manner of scoring that it would be absolutely 
impossible to keep it without going 'ratty.' " 

JACK RYDER, Cincinnati Enquirer. 

"In my judgment, the present method is superior to any that has yet 
been proposed. The object of a pitcher is to win his game and the 
public which keeps track of the averages is mainly interested in the 
success of a pitcher in winning his games. Of course, a high-class 
pitcher on a low-class club gets a little the worst of it in the averages, 
but the general working of the present system is comparatively fair. I 
think, when taken into conigderation with the standing of his club, each 
pitcher is apt to get credit for about what is coming to him. I believe 

# that it would be a mistake to rate pitchers in any other way than 

'according to the games won by them." 

REIT MULPOSD, Jr., Cincinnati Correspondent Philadelphia 
Sporting 1 Life. 
"The rules now in vogue for separating the pitching sheep from the 
goats seem unsatisfactorily clear enough. Sometimes the rules have been 
officially stretched and the victor's palm given to. twirlers who, under 
the strictest interpretation of laws laid down for scorers, should have 
been charged with defeat. Here's a case in point: With the score tied 
in the tenth, Gasper is taken out to permit some one else to bat for him 
at a time when a hit would mean victory. The hit wasn't made. Ewing 
stepped in and shut the other fellows out in the eleventh and then 
Cincinnati 'in their half pounded in a run and victory. The rules prescribe 
the credit for victory to Ewing. And these rules render of uncertain 
value the record of winning and losing pitchers. Official scorers, how- 
ever, should be given latitude to allow their own good judgment to rule 
in deciding cases such as the one I have cited. Real pitching values 
are only established by the percentage of runs made off the delivery of 
the man at the firing line." 

R. W. GARDNER, Chicago Tribune. 

"Although the present system of rating pitchers at the end of the 
season does not give a true conception of their strength, I do not think 
a new system, such as figuring the percentage of earned runs or hits 
per inning, would meet with the favor of the Base Ball public at large. 
The latter wants averages it can understand at a glance; it wants to 
know what pitcher won most games and what pitcher lost least. As a 
rule, Base Ball players and club owners can pick the strongest pitchers 
without consulting the averages, so a new system would not be giving 
them much information and the sort it would give the public would not 
be appreciated." 




1, Jack Ryder, Cincinnati Enquirer; 2, Frank W. Rostock, Cincinnati 
Post; 3, Ren Mulford, Jr., Cincinnati correspondent Sporting Life, 
Philadelphia; 4, H. W. Lanigan, St. Louis Times; 5, M. F. Parker, 
St. Louis Globe Democrat. 

A GROUP OF CINCINNATI AND ST. LOUIS MEMBERS OF THE 
BASE BALL WRITERS' ASSOCIATION. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL. BASE BALL. GUIDE. 39 

GEOBCrE C. RICE, Chicago News. 

"A record of games won and lost by pitchers gives no idea of the value 
of a pitcher, inasmuch as the team behind him may be responsible for 
a victory or a loss. To find out the true worth of a pitcher it is neces- 
sary to keep a record of the hits and runs made off him, the number of 
strike-outs he makes and the bases on balls that he gives. This will 
give the individual merit of the pitcher and would establish his value 
much better than the present method of counting victories and defeats." 

I. E. SANBORN, Chicago Tribune. 

"There is no question but the present system is almost valueless, nor 
have I heard a suggestion which would make the basis of games won a 
fair one. Without taking time to give the question serious thought, 
would it not be possible to evolve some system based on the average of 
runs scored to innings pitched or on the average of base hits to innings 
pitched? The basis of runs scored has the advantage that there are 
pitchers on whom it is hard to score, although they may be hit rather 
freely, but it has the disadvantage that it would be difficult to decide 
sometimes which pitcher should be charged with runs when one pitcher 
replaces another with runners on the bases and these runners score in 
that inning. The basis of base hits has the disadvantage that it would 
rate the pitcher with poor control, who issues many passes, above the 
better pitcher, who made every man hit the ball. To both these sugges- 
tions there is the objection that the element of good or bad support 
cannot be figured in and errors often are responsible for runs and hits 
which good support would have averted. Revival of the earned run 
would not be an altogether fair basis unless bases on balls were counted 
as contributory to an earned run, and unless a hard and fast definition 
of an earned run were made and adhered to uniformly. With those 
provisos the earned run might solve the problem. The man who sug- 
gests the solution to which no objection can be made will deserve a 
monument at the entrance to every Base Ball park in the land, for he 
will have done the game a great and lasting benefit." 

ALFRED R. CKATTY, Pittsburg" Correspondent Philadelphia 
Sporting Life. 
"The present plan might be better if it were put on a sensible basis. 
They tell me that Secretary Heydler, of the National League, rules only 
after he has looked carefully into the angles of the game. The situation 
is gone over thoroughly. For example, a pitcher goes along finely for a 
few rounds and then suddenly develops a bad spell, filling the bags. The 
relief call is sounded. On to the slab comes a change twirler. Latter 
is unable to check scoring. A long hit clears the bags. The score had 
been a tie, but this smash puts the offensive team far in the lead and 
virtually wins the game. That event is marked 'Lost,' not against the 
relieving pitcher but against the one who created the mess, filled the 
bases. You know there are twirlers who have had spells. Often they 
are relieved by a substitute at a critical time. The 'sub' checks the 
going and the pitcher who was responsible for the mass of men on the 
bags is credited by most people with a victory. He doesn't deserve it. 
Heydler doesn't give it to him. Common sense, well applied, might 
improve the system now in vogue." 

J. C. CxILRUTK, Chicago News. 

"I believe it would help greatly in determining a pitcher's actual 
ability to add three new columns to the official records of the pitcher's 
averages, showing the total number of times at bat against him, the 
total number of runs scored off him and the total number of hits made 
off him. This would at least give an idea of a pitcher's effectiveness 
against batters. 

"Games are won by the runs scored, so why not figure the standing 
of the pitchers on the runs scored off the twirler, based on the total 
number of innings pitched by him? This would reverse the present 
percentage standing, the smallest figures denoting the highest place in 



Jam Jp ' mM i mmk. 

lip' 







1, Billy Murphy, Star; 2, Willis E. Johnson, Globe-Democrat: 3, J. 
E. Wray, Post-Dispatch; 4, James Crusinberry, Post-Dispatch; 5, 
Brice Hoskins, Star. 

A GROUP OF ST. LOUIS MEMBERS OF THE BASE BALL 
WRITERS' ASSOCIATION. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL. BASE BALL GUIDE. 41 

the list. For instance — Brown pitched 331 full innings and had 77 runs 
scored against him, giving an average of .233. Reulbach pitched 262 
full innings, and 69 runs were scored otf him, giving a percentage of 
.263. Overall pitched 193 full innings, had 67 runs scored against him, 
and his average would be .347. 

"Runners get on base and advance until they tally runs, largely 
through the pitching — base hits, bases on balls, hit by pitched balls, 
balks. Almost the only outside influences helping the batter to become 
a base runner and to score runs are fielding errors and a fielder's choice, 
which cuts off one base runner in permitting another to get on. The 
percentage is about two to one all the time against the pitcher. This 
shows how heavily his work figures in the scoring of runs — the winning 
or losing of games. 

"The objection, in my mind, to rating the pitchers on the base hits 
made off them is that it is runs, not hits, that determine the result of 
a game. Some of the greatest pitchers Base Ball has known were hit 
hard when there was no imminent danger of defeat, yet possessed the 
ability to tighten up and cut off a run in a pinch." 

MALCOLM MacLEAN, Chicago Examiner. 

When a pitcher is taken from the box with the score against him 
cr tied he should be credited with the defeat if there are one or more 
men on the bases at the time, whether there are any batters out or not. 
But — in case the pitcher who relieves him ends with a victory, the 
latter should be credited with said victory. There should, however, be a 
separate column in such instances. In other words there should be a 
percentage for FULL games a pitcher has won and lost AND a percentage 
for PARTIAL games he has won and lost. 

HENSY P. EDWARDS, Cleveland Plain Dealer. 

"The question of deciding which pitcher, in event of more than one 
participating in a game for the same club, is to be credited with the 
victory or charged with defeat is a difficult one on which to secure 
uniformity. In Cleveland we have attempted to use commor sense and 
justice. 

"For instance, say Cleveland is playing Boston, with Joss and Wood 
the opposing pitchers. The score is to at the end of the second 
half of the eighth. Joss is taken out, to allow another batsman to take 
his place. Cleveland scores one or more runs that half. Boston fails to 
score in the ninth, with Berger pitching. In such a case, it has been 
our rule to credit Joss the victory. Some scorers might say he was not 
in the game when the winning run was scored and that the victory 
should go to the pitcher who finished. I think the just way is the way 
I have mentioned. 

"In event of a pitcher having bequeathed occupants of some of the 
bases when he is relieved in a close game, one or more of said occu- 
pants subsequently scoring prior to the retirement of the side in that 
inning, I believe that the first pitcher should be charged with the defeat 
unless the score is subsequently tied, even though his team was in the 
lead when he was taken out. 

"Another peculiar case which I believe is decided unjustly at present 
is this. Say New York and Chicago are playing. New York scores six 
runs off Overall in the first inning. He is relieved by Brown. Later 
Chicago ties the score. The game goes into extra innings. An error 
allows New York to win out by the score of 7 to 6 in the thirteenth. 
According to the scoring rules which are in vogue at present, Brown 
would be charged with the defeat. Should he? He pitches eleven shut- 
out innings and is scored on only once and then through an error made 
by one of the men behind him. Overall, on the other hand, pitched 
one very bad inning and was responsible for his team being scored upon 
six times. I would use justice in this case again and charge Overall 
with the defeat, even though Brown had an even chance to win from the 
eighth inning on." 




1, Will McKay, formerly sporting editor Leader, now Supervisor ol 
Sports of the city of Cleveland; 2, Howard Mann, sporting editor 
Press; 3, Ed F. Bang, sporting editor News; 4, Frank G. Hard. 
Leader News Bureau; 5, Henry P c Edwards, Plaindealer; 6, Harry 
Neily, Plaindealer. 

A GROUP OF CLEVELAND MEMBERS OF THE BASE BALL 
WRITERS' ASSOCIATION. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 43 

Wonderful Prophecy Quickly Realized 

By John B. Foster. 

It was a little more than one year ago that Mr. Albert G. 
Spalding sat in his office in New York city, discussing the various 
affairs which pertain to the national pastime. There is none 
living to-day who has had the experience" which has fallen to his 
lot as both 'owner and player. 

No man knows more of the essentials of both features of the 
sport. His relations with Base Ball have been those of a builder, 
not only at the inception of the National League in 1876, but prior 
to it, when he was a player, and quick to suggest needed reforms 
before they were proposed by gentlemen who were then owners. 

As Mr. Spalding, during the conversation to which reference is 
made, grew more and more entertaining with his comment on Base 
Ball affairs he was asked what he thought might be the future 
of the national pastime. 

Rising quickly from the desk at which he had been sitting, with 
great earnestness, he took three or four strides about the room 
and then pausing abruptly raised his arm and brought the index 
finger of the upraised hand emphatically upon the outstretched 
palm of the other and for the moment became a prophet. 

"The future of Base Ball," said Mr. Spalding, "is greater than 
the most optimistic of the owners of the present day dare dream 
in their most prosperous moments. In years to come there will 
be magnificent steel and stone stands, two and three stories high, 
with superb playing lawns stretching in front of them. There will 
be open seats for those who prefer to sit in the sunlight and they 
will be built on structures of brick, concrete, steel and stone. There 
will be modern conveniences at every Base Ball park which will be 
equal to those of the theater. Crowds will attend the sport greater 
in number than ever have attended it in the past and they will 
be made up of the representative men and women of the nation." 

"When this prediction was made not •one of the owners of the 
valuable franchises in the National and American Leagues had 
announced that he intended to improve his property. Within the 
short time which has elapsed since the prophetic voice of the sage 
of Base Bail made its utterance the magnitude of building opera- 
tions in the East and the West, on both National and American 
League grounds, has been even more wonderful than the Base Ball 
races of the current season. 

No better term may be used, therefore, to describe the years 
1908-09 than to call them the "building era of Base Ball." Within 
this period the most elaborate and costly improvements have been 
projected and carried to completion by owners of clubs who are 
further determined to put the national sport In its professional 
capacity on a permanent basis. 

The Chicago National League club was first of all to enlarge the 
capacity of its stands and to make such alterations as might in 
the opinion of its owner provide more physical comfort for the 
patrons. Owing to the fact that the real estate on which the 
Chicago field is located is not owned by the company controlling 
the team, the management did not go into a system of detail which 
would have converted the plant into a permanent institution. 

It did make such improvements as were believed to be war- 
ranted, in view of the length of time which the lease has to operate. 
The capacity of the grand stand was greatly increased by extending 
it along both wings and by rearranging the seats of the boxes. 
The success of the Chicago club well guaranteed the expenditure 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 45 

for the seating capacity of the plant has frequently been tested 
during the games for world's championships and when such keen 
rivals as Pittsburg and New York were engaged in Chicago. 

Before the season had been half completed the owners of the 
Philadelphia American League club announced that they had pur- 
chased a plot of ground in the western part of the city and would 
erect thereon the most palatial Base Ball structure in the world. 

There is a splendid amount of local pride in Philadelphia for 
Base Ball, as well as great respect for the national pastime. That 
local pride is such that the property of the Philadelphia American 
League club was secured to it through legal procedure in such a 
manner that it was agreed never to cut a street through the park. 
Would that other cities in the United States would be liberal 
enough and thoughtful enough to do the same thing. No possible 
harm can come to young or old America by encouraging a good 
healthy sport like Base Ball. 

By the beginning of the season of 1909 the Philadelphia stand 
was completed and it was dedicated on April 12 — Easter Monday — ■ 
at which time the Philadelphia and Boston clubs of the American 
League played a regular championship game. Invited guests were 
present from all parts of the United States and it was generally 
conceded that Benjamin P. Shibe and his associates of the Phila- 
delphia American League had indeed erected a monument to 
Base Ball. 

The stand is a splendid structure of steel and cement. The field 
is one of the finest in the United States. The Athletics of the 
American League will have a home until the players of the present 
generation have grown gray, and passed away, and their children's 
children have passed away. There is scarcely a limit to the dura- 
tion of time in which this great structure will last for all sub- 
stantial purposes concerning Base Ball. The general undertaking 
represents an outlay of not far from half a million dollars, yet 
the investment is held everywhere to be a good one. 

In the season of 1908 the management of the New York National 
League club had undertaken to make some improvements on the 
stands at the Polo Ground. 

It had been the wish of John T. Brush, from the time that he 
acquired the control of the New Y'ork club, to find a suitable area 
in New Y'ork and build a permanent stand of steel and concrete 
that would surpass anything which had ever been contemplated 
for outdoor athletics. 

Of course there was no site more convenient than the Polo 
Ground, but no declaration could be obtained from the aldermen of 
New York that they would leave the field unmolested, if Mr. Brush 
attempted to secure it for permanent improvement, and more than 
that there was alleged to be some question as to the title to 
the land. 

While negotiations were going on, the owner of the New York 
club had it in his mind that he would improve the present field 
even though it was out of the question to secure it for permanent 
purposes. At length he was able to extend his lease for a period 
of some years. When the papers were signed he summoned an 
architect and told him to go ahead with such improvements as 
would occupy every available inch of space for the benefit of the 
spectators and still not mar the playing field. 

The result of the labor of the architect was a rather odd effect 
by which the Polo Ground playing field was surrounded quite com- 
pletely by a wooden stadium. There is not another ball playing 
field in the world like it. Its dimensions are larger than most 
professional fields, yet it is completely surrounded by terraces 
of seats. The amount of money which was invested in the improve- 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 47 

merits ran well over $100,000. Mr. Brush would willingly have 

gone forward with ten times that sum had he been able to hold the 
property in perpetuity after the improvements had been made. Of 
course it is understood that he would have taken up the entire 
tract of real estate had it been possible to do so. The seating 
capacity of the Polo Ground is much in excess of 30,000 spectators. 

While the improvements at the Polo Ground were being made, 
Barney Dreyfuss. owner of the Pittsburg club, announced that he 
had secured a desirable plot of real estate near Schenley Park in 
that city and would give Pittsburg a permanent diamond and 
stands. 

Improvements were started the moment that the weather per- 
mitted them to begin. The held had to be graded and the ground 
prepared for the erection of the buildings. Not a bit daunted by 
the work to be done, Mr. Dreyfuss announced that the new field 
would be ready for occupancy in the latter part of June — and 
it was. 

The new stand of the Philadelphia American League club had 
been characterized as a Base Ball palace. That of Mr. Dreyfuss' 
is another Base Ball palace. It is one of the finest structures for 
outdoor amusement that has been built in any part of the world. 
It is all sreel and concrete, and most ornate, from an architectural 
standpoint. With its high towering galleries it provides seats 
and splendid outlook in every foot of the huge structure. The 
field is so ample that further enlargement of the stands is possible 
at any time that the owner sees fit to make it. The grand stand 
is provided with elevators, electric lights, and conveniences never 
thought possible in the Base Ball of twenty-five years ago. 

For years to come it will be one of the sights of the thrifty 
and enterprising city which now possesses a permanent Base 
Ball home. 

The St. Louis American League club, not to be outdone by what 
was going on in other cities, erected a substantial, commodious 
and airy stand for the patrons of that city. 

It is larger than anything which the American League has pos- 

:1 in St. Louis in the past, and by far more comfortable. It is 

expected that it will provide better facilities for some seasons in 

the future and if it proves to be too small the owners will gladly 

add to its capacity for accommodation. 

Brooklyn caught the fever and improved the stands which had 
been built a tew years before. Boxes were added and the general 
arrangements were better adapted by the comfort of Base Ball 
enthusiasts. 

Then came the news that the popular owner of the Chicago 
American League club, Charles A. Comiskey, had made a costly 
purchase of real estate in that city and would join with other 
holders of Base Ball properties in improving accommodations for 
spectators. 

The field is bounded by Thirty-fourth Street, Thirty-fifth Street, 
Wentworth Avenue and Shields Avenue, and covers about 600 
square feet of ground. The main entrance is to be at the corner 
of Thirty-fifth Street and Shields Avenue. There will be twelve 
ticket booths and twelve ticket takers and it is hoped that the 
congestion which has prevailed at the old South Side ground will 
holly done away with in the future. 

When the stand is completed it will be like others of its type,. 
absolutely fireproof. Steel, concrete and brick will be used through- 
The grand stand will be patterned after the colosseum of 
Kom^. Seating capacity will be provided for 30,000 spectators in 
both grand stand and bleachers and the grand stand will be double 
decked. 




1, T. M. Chivington, President American Association; 2, Thomas F. 
Graham. President Pacific Coast League; 3, A. R. Tearney. President 
I.-I.-I. League; 4, Chas. F. Moll, President Wisconsin-Illinois League; 
5, C. J. Eckstorm, President Western Canada League; 6, W. C. 
Ussery, President Blue Grass League; 7, M. E. Justice, President 
Central Association. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 49 

The home of the White Sox will be one of the ornaments of the 
American League circuit. 

Cleveland comes to the front with another improved plant which 
will be a beauty. Alterations were begun last year, when the 
entrance was rebuilt and the moment that the season was com- 
pleted in Cleveland last fall, work was begun to provide the Forest 
City with a structure which will be a rival of others which have 
been constructed over the American League circuit. 

As has been the case in other cities, Cleveland's aim will be to 
provide a permanent plant, which shall not be destroyed by fire 
and which shall prove ample to accommodate the thousands who 
will desire to see Base Ball in the future. 

Detroit is to grace the American League circuit with a new 
stand and field stand. Detroit, like the other cities, will provide a 
permanent field and substantial structures for the comfort of the 
immense crowds of Base Ball enthusiasts who are expected to be 
patrons of the sport in the future. 

At the ground of the Boston American League club additions 
were made to the seating capacity of the stands during the sum- 
mer, and the announcement is published in St. Louis that the 
real estate on which the National League club plays for the edifica- 
tion of the St. Louis enthusiasts, has been purchased outright and 
that new stands and pavilions will soon be erected in St. Louis. 
Mr. M. Stanley Robison, having made a thorough inspection, of all 
the new fields throughout the country, determined that wnen he 
builds in St. Louis it will be one of the show places of the 
metropolis of Missouri. 

The minor leagues have been prosperous as well as the majors. 
One of the features of the season of 1909 was the dedication of 
Swayne Field in Toledo. The diamond and the general conveni- 
ences are far better than were to be found on the major league 
grounds in the old days. 

The field is one of the attractions of the American Association 
and the fact that it is a permanent institution has given Toledo 
a real impetus in its own city, showing that when the population 
accepts Base Ball as a settled fact its patronage increases rather 
than decreases. 

Indianapolis is another city which was favored with a new 
stand at the beginning of the year. It so far surpasses the old 
accommodations which were provided at Indianapolis, in the days 
when the Indianapolis club was a member of the National League 
circuit, that old timers can scarcely believe their eyes when they 
go out to the ground and see what has been done to place Base 
Ball on a comfortable plane for the "fans" of Indiana. 

Everywhere improvements are projected and it is certain that 
the limit is far from being reached, for if it is possible at any time 
to secure permanent quarters for Base Ball in New York, there is 
not a doubt that a wonderful stand will be built to take care of 
the thousands of Base Ball enthusiasts who devote their spare 
moments to the great outdoor sport in the metropolis. 

But, after all, perhaps one of the most interesting facts In 
•connection with the expenditure of this large sum of money to 
further the interests of the national pastime, is that the prophecy 
of the oldest adviser in Base Ball should have been so quickly 
realized. Without the slightest knowledge of what was contem- 
plated throughout the National and American League circuits Mr. 
Spalding beheld his prediction confirmed within a few months of 
the day that he uttered it. It shows how thoroughly he realizes 
the hold of Base Ball, properly conducted, on the American public. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. a 

President's Day at Chicago 

"Let me sit with the 'fans,' *' said President William H. Taft, 
Thursday afternoon, September 16, 1909. when he walked into the 
Base Ball park of the Chicago National League Base Ball club, 
the guest of Charles W. Murphy, the owner of the club. 

And he did. 

Though a special box had been provided for him, the President 
preferred that he might join the real "rooters," and, among them 
and one of them, he enjoyed one of the brilliant games of the 
year in company with more than 30,000 other enthusiasts, who 
witnessed the defeat of the Chicago team by New York by the 
score of 2 to 1. 

A good game? Indeed it was, for not only were those two 
warm rivals, Chicago and New York, contesting against one an- 
other, but Mathewson and Brown, the kings of the National 
League in the pitcher's position, were "on the mound" — the tech- 
nical vernacular for pitching — and animated by the strongest 
desire to win before their distinguished guest. 

It was the first time in the history of the National game that 
there had been a real "President's Day." It was the first time 
that the executive head of the nation had accepted a special invi- 
tation, extended to him early in the year, to be present at one of 
the historic contests which have made Base Ball famous, not only 
in the land of its birth and development, but in most of the coun- 
tries of the globe. 

Long before the game began thousands of the citizens of Chicago 
and hundreds from nearby cities and towns, who had been attracted 
to the contest because the President of the United States was to be 
present, filled street cars, motor cars and other means of -convey- 
ance on their way to the park, and when the Presidential party 
arrived at the main entrance to the grounds every seat was filled, 
standing room was at a premium, and the crowd was divided 
between admiration for the players as they went through their 
preliminary practice and the expected arrival of the President. 

Shouts of "Here he comes" greeted the President as he slowly 
made his way down an aisle of the densely-packed grand stand, 
and when he appeared in the front of the structure and was visible 
to the waiting throng, a volume of cheers rolled up, such as Amer- 
icans bestow when they are excitedly pleased and vigorously dem- 
onstrative. 

He walked through the crowd, greeted on every side by cries of 
welcome, and was escorted to the field, where the players' of both 
teams were quickly assembled and introduced to him, one by one, 
in person. There was a handshake for every man who was to take 
part in the game, and for the men on the bench as well, and now 
and then, as well known players, such as Mathewson, Brown, 
Tenney, Evers, Devlin or Tinker, was introduced to the head of 
the nation, a word of congratulation as well. When Chance and 
McGraw, the famous managers of their equally famous clubs, met 
the President, he congratulated them briefly on their skill in their 
calling. 

Anson, hero of battles for years en the diamond, was introduced 
to the President, who shook him warmly by the hand. He was 
introduced to August Herrmann, the Chairman of the National 
Commission, one of the "chief justices of the supreme court of 
Base Ball" ; to John A. Heydler, President of the National League 
and also a member of the National Commission, and to others who 
are famous by their connection with the national game. Mr. 
Heydler was invited to join the President's party, and was fre- 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 53 

-quently consulted by the President on plays and decisions of the 
umpire. Charles W. Murphy of the Chicago club also joined the 
President for part of the game. 

In the first inning of the contest Doyle led off for New York 
with a two-base hit. Seymour sacrificed and McCormiek was safe 
at first. Murray and Devlin followed for New York with singles 
and Doyle and McCormiek scored. Those were the only runs made 
by the Giants in the game, but they were enough to win. 

In the second inning a two-bagger by Tinker and a single by 
Archer scored the only run made by Chicago in the game. 

Through the third, fourth, fifth and sixth innings the teams 
fought gallantly, and in the first half of the "lucky seventh" the 
Giants failed to make a run. When the last half of the seventh 
began and the local enthusiasts arose to their feet "for luck," Presi- 
dent Taft also stood up, and when the crowd saw him on his feet 
there was a mighty cheer from the "bleacherites," who attested 
their appreciation of the good efforts of the head of the Nation in 
behalf of Chicago. Although the inning brought forth only a blank 
for the home team the crowd did not forget that the President 
had "joined the fans" and been with them in the hope that the 
tide of battle might turn. 

Once during the game Mr. Taft was asked by one of his party : 
"Mr. President, whom are you for, Chicago or New York?" 

"I am for Cincinnati," was the quick and unexpected reply, which 
'brought forth a shout 01 laughter. He gave an anxious look 
toward the score-board, which showed that Cincinnati had two and 
Pittsburg two in the seventh inning. A moment later the score- 
board boy marked up four for Pittsburg in the eighth and two more 
in the ninth, and the President sadly shook his head amid a roar 
of laughter, and said that he was dumbfounded. 

As he left the park at the conclusion of the game the cheers fol- 
lowed him for miles into the city. It was a great day for Chicago 
and a great day for Base Ball. 

"Let me sit with the fans." Truly a historic remark. One that 
will not be forgotten for years to conie. How aptly it showed the 
true democracy of the man and the game ! Base Ball welcomes all. 
Be they high in estate or low, they are one when they meet on a 
common footing to witness a contest for supremacy of a type such 
as that which professional Base Ball has established throughout 
the Republic. 

The "fan" is a great, big, true-hearted, staunch American citizen. 
Loyal to the core, all that he asks is fair play and true sports- 
manship, and none knows better than President William H. Taft 
of the United States, who preferred to be one of them rather than 
an occupant of a private box, isolated by even so trifling a matter 
as a mere bit of pine scantling. It was a great tribute to the 
"fans" as well as to Base Ball, when President Taft saw New York 
and Chicago play in Chicago on September 16, 1909. 




THE TWO CHAMPION BATTERS OF THEIR RESPECTIVE 

LEAGUES, TY COBB AND HANS WAGNER, SHAKING 

HANDS AT THE WORLD'S CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 55 

The National League Season of 1909 

By John B. Foster. 

Were it to be said that Pittsburg- flashed through the season of 
1909 in the contest for the championship of the National League 
of Base Ball clubs' as a comet flares its luminant way through 
the heavens, it would, perhaps, be not wholly accurate* and yet, 
on the other hand, we might permit the other seven clubs to enter 
conjointly into the figure of speech, still describing Pittsburg as 
a comet, and affirm that this valorous organization, which was 
built up to championship form, was the head of the comet and the 
remaining seven clubs spread irregularly behind it, the appendage 
to the brilliant body that illumined the Base Ball firmament. 

For the National League race, even though it did not possess 
the commanding power of attraction and the vital elements of in- 
terest which gave the campaign of the oldest organization in Base 
Ball such a wonderful season as that of 1908, it was above the 
ordinary in those requisites which go to make a successful Base 
Ball struggle. 

The attendance was greater than in preceding years, though less 
evenly distributed than it would have been had the race been more 
evenly contested. The contest at times approached the stage of 
highest enthusiasm ; the . individual team work of organizations 
was occasionally so harmonious and perfect as to elicit the highest 
approbation from the expert critics and from that grand body of 
judges which has learned to extend its approbation with in- 
telligent knowledge — the "fans" — the common body politic that dis- 
criminates with uniformly good judgment. 

It was through the excellent work of the Pittsburgh from the 
beginning of the year that the race resolved itself into what is 
commonly known as a one-club battle against the field. 

Early in the Spring the Pittsburgs assumed the lead in the 
race, and from the time that they did so put all the remaining clubs 
of the league on the defensive. Once or twice Pittsburg's command- 
ing position was closely assailed, and once or twice it looked as if 
the leaders might be in danger of being compelled for the moment 
to strike their colors, but led by an indomitable leader, Fred 
Clarke, to whom- the greatest credit must be given for the rally- 
ing power which he infused into his men when danger threatened, 
Tittsburg sturdily refased to relinquish its advantage, and when 
the test of the final month came, resolutely fought behind its own 
entrenchments and on the fields of the enemy until that day ar- 
rived in September when its nearest rival could no longer assure 
itself that any possibility existed for it to defeat the leaders. 

Collectively, Pittsburg had all the National League on the 
defensive from the early part of May. Were our Base Ball cam- 
paigns waged solely for the purpose of commercial gain, so dis- 
tinct an advantage* had been achieved that, without an organiza- 
tion managed so admirably and conducted on a plane of sports- 
manship so far above the average of professionalism, unscrupulous 
methods might have been adopted to sway public sentiment and 
affect local conditions. 

While not denying that perfectly legitimate changes are possible 
under rules which govern all sport fairly administered, the mere 
fact that Pittsburg kept the remainder of the league on the defen- 
sive throughout afmost all of the year is a significant demonstra- 
tion that the main purpose of individual club owners in the 
National League is to win the championship by fair means at all 




1, Fred Clarke, Mgr. ; 2, Hans Wagner; 3, Adams; 4, Gibson. 

VanOeyen, Photo. 
A GROUP OF WORLD'S CHAMPIONS, 1909. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 57 

times without regard to the immediate effect it may have upon 
their personal interests. 

Therein lies the strength of the major organization which con- 
trols our national game in a professioDal capacity. We have yet 
to find a club owner who, by the slightest manoeuvre, has shown 
indication that his heart is not in the purpose of winning the 
pennant, if his team is strong enough to do so, no matter if, by 
so doing, he leaves his fellow members practically stranded on the 
shoals which must be cleared before the ship finds smooth water 
and the flag of victory may be proudly run to the mast-head. 

In looking over the results of the season of 1909 we cannot say 
that the rivalry between the clubs was such that excitement was 
raised to the highest pitch, because one club, then a second and 
possibly a third, forged to the front, only to lose its position 
later. Quite the contrary, all that is left by which to describe 
the race is to state that Pittsburg had its head and shoulders in 
front all of the time, except in the earliest days of the campaign, 
while two other clubs of the organization vainly strove above 
their fellows to bring the leaders nearer to an equality with the 
other seven members. 

There was never an opportunity for the Base Ball patrons of 
other cities in the National League except Pittsburg to shout 
exultantly after the end of a week's work : "We have passed 
them at last," and yet, in the face of this lack of diversity, the 
championship contest, as a whole, was gloriously patronized. 

Only one deduction can be drawn from these facts. A Base 
Ball race can be made interesting, can be made popular, and is 
not without its fullest side of entertainment, even if one club is 
in front the larger part of the season. Why such should be the 
case is equally as apparent. A Base Ball race, in which the 
people have implicit confidence and which is known to be honor- 
ably managed, will not lack for appreciation in view of the fact 
that our public, little by little, and even though the growth be 
slow, is beginning to recognize the vital principles of the game 
as a whole and admire more than ever its exhibits as an achieve- 
ment of athletic perfection. 

Therefore, if a club starts in front, and if it remains in front 
for a long period, or for all of the period which is given to Base 
Ball, the proof has been given that there may be steady patronage 
on the part of those who hope that at some time during the 
progress of the battle the leaders may be overcome in fair fight. 
That is what honest sport means. 

Necessarily one looks toward the championship winners with an 
eye of interest to try to analyze their strength and to attempt to 
ascertain why they made such a good showing against the best 
ball players who could be obtained by seven other club owners to 
compete against them. 

Take the Pittsburg team as a whole and it 

The must be conceded that what one may call high 

Pittsbure" average ability existed in every department 

* - _ s In one or two instances the skill of the player 

CIUD W as beyond the ordinary. We may cite 

Wagner at shortstop, Clarke in left field, and 

Gibson as catcher in this respect. 

Return for a moment to the finish of the campaign of 1908. 
Three clubs were thickly in the fight all the year. Of these Pitts- 
burg was one, Chicago a second and New York a third. Recall 
how the New York team, by losing a game through a violation of 








■ >.^i^-^y;,>y; : : 






1, Willis; 2, Abbaticchio; 3, Maddox; 4, Miller; 5, Leever. 

Photos by Cordon and VanOeyen. 
A GROUP OF WORLD'S CHAMPIONS, 1909. 



SrALDlNG'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 59 

a rule as interpreted by the President and Board of Directors of 
the National League, eventually lost the championship, after play- 
ing a post-season game with Chicago to obviate a tie. 

Pittsburg was so little behind both New York and Chicago that 
when the season was expiring — indeed in the last moments of its 
existence — there was a possibility of a three-cornered tie in which 
Pittsburg would have been involved with the other two organi- 
zations. 

It will no doubt be remembered by many that Pittsburg, when 
the 1908 race was over, was frequently alluded to as the club 
that might have won the championship had it been possessed of 
a good first baseman. Hence, it is evident that Pittsburg pos- 
sessed such inherent strength that, by the simplest course of 
reasoning, it would not need heroic treatment to prepare it for the 
season to come. 

Nor was such heroic treatment attempted. Plans had been laid 
before the close of the season of 1908 to obtain a better first 
baseman for the season of 1909, and thus when the season of 
1909 began one of the weaknesses which had been embarrassing 
to the club in the year before, had been eliminated so far as 
could be judged. 

Granting that degree of improvement to the team for 1909, with 
whatever improvement may have been effected by securing better 
pitchers, a move which we expect of every Base Ball nine from 
season to season from the highest to the lowliest, for the neces- 
sity of good pitching is a necessity which calls for yearly changes, 
it is very clear when a -careful analysis of the work of the Pitts- 
burg nine is made, that the good fortune which enrolled the 
services of Miller, the second baseman for the team in 1909, was 
fully as much a determining factor for Pittsburg's success in the 
early part of the season, and toward the close as well, as any- 
thing which was done to bolster the general speed of the club by 
securing a new first baseman. 

After studying the scores which were made by Pittsburg through- 
out the year it may well be said that, if Clarke had not so quickly 
developed the playing strength of Miller and been such a good 
judge of Base Ball ability as to see his worth at the outset of 
the year, Pittsburg would have had a much harder time to hold 
its place in front of the other clubs and might have been striving 
in a contest which vacillated, as that of 1908. 

Miller appeared in Pittsburg at a time when the slightest pre- 
ponderance of added power, providing all the other players in the 
nine were up to their standard of the previous year, meant the 
turning of the balance in Pittsburg's favor. It is by just such 
increases of playing force that the championship value of a team 
is enhanced. 

There have been other instances in the history of professional 
Base Ball — not few. but many — in which a team was so close to 
the realization of a championship that the securing of a single 
man might have turned the battle in its favor, but lo, to find the 
player was quite another question. Conversely, it is true that 
there have been instances in which the single player has been 
found, as in the case of Pittsburg, and with his discovery has 
come the realization of many years of sincere endeavor. 

No matter what view the Base Ball historian may hold as to 
the strength of the Pittsburg team of 1909, compared with other 
teams of the past, it cannot be denied that as a team it was a 
solidly built and compact one. 

Wagner, of course, is a player of the type who seems to come 
only as new stars are discovered at rare intervals in the skies, 
but' aside from him the Pittsburgs as a whole were made up of 




1, Phillippe; 2, Hans Wagner; 3, Wilson; 4, Leifield; 5. Abstein. 
, VanOeyen, Photo. 

A GROUP OF WORLD'S CHAMPIONS, 1909. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 61 

players who could be depended upon to do the correct thing most 
of the time, if they were unable to do it all of the time. 

They played good, sound, orthodox Base Ball, with occasional 
flashes of brilliancy excelled by none. There were times when the 
outfield work of the nine was far beyond the ordinary, just as 
there were moments when Wagner seemed superhuman and 
stopped batted balls that one would almost believe out of the 
range of man's feeble possibilities. 

Chicago, three times the winner of the cham- 

The pionship in the National League, finishing 

n-i--^ first in 1906, 1907 and 1908, was the runner- 

jhi »T up for the season of 1909 - 

ClUD There was reason for the inability of the 

Chicago club to win the championship for the 
fourth time in succession. Perhaps the most powerful reason of 
all — long years in service — which decreases the speed of any Base 
Ball organization, was what handicapped them in their efforts to 
land the pennant. 

We must add to that fact that the team was without the ser- 
vices all the year of Kling, a wonderfully good catcher, by some 
considered to be the best in the National League, who had a 
disagreement with the management and remained at his home in 
Kansas City. In the early part of the season the team was 
without Evers, a second baseman of more than ordinary skill and 
a player of good judgment, who was granted a leave of absence 
that he might recover from the strain of active service on the 
field. 

The deprivation .at one time of the services of two such excel- 
lent players of itself would be sufficient to handicap any Base 
Ball club, and if added to tfrat there may be a trifling diminution 
in athletic force, as compared with other seasons, it is palpable 
that the effort to win will be a shade more exacting than it has 
been in other years. 

Chicago seemed to be no less strong in fielding than it had been 
in the past. It was not in the work of defense that the team 
appeared less vigorous, but in its run-getting power. There was 
a time when the ability of the Chicago players to score was in 
superior ratio to all its other departments of play. It was essen- 
tially a team of run-getters and made runs by methods which 
were not only keenly delightful to contemplate, but calling for 
the highest physical skill. It seemed in 1909, not all the time 
but on occasions, as if the wcrk of scoring were harder by the 
exactions which had been put upon the men. 

It must not be considered, however, that the Chicago club was 
one whit less eager and determined to win, and to every member 
of the team the greatest credit must be given for making a 
thoroughly sportsmanlike and game struggle to secure the cham- 
pionship in the face of all obstacles. 

There was no time that the confidence of the leader of the 
team, Frank Chance, was shaken in the ultimate ability of his 
players to beat Pittsburg, and until the very last days of the 
season, when Pittsburg's victory was assured and Chicago's 
chances became hopeless, not a 'word was heard from his lips 
that would indicate that his confidence was abated one iota. Day 
after day he stood on the field exhorting his players to do their 
best, handling the delicate machinery of his team with the art of 
a master, planning his campaign in such a manner as to bring 
forth the best results from men ui whom he had that rare good 




1, Leach; 2, Camnitz; 3, Leach, Jr., Mascot; 4, Byrne: 5. Simon. 

Conlon, Photo. 
A GROUP OF WORLD'S CHAMPIONS, 1909. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 63 

faith which is the result of experience and association, and taking 
advantage of every legitimate strategy which is a part of the 
national game. 

That he was' deeply concerned in winning the championship for 
the fourth time in succession — an honor which any Base Ball 
club in a major league might covet — no one could doubt who had 
the pleasure of conversing with him in regard to National League 
Base Ball. He was tireless in his administration as leader of 
the team, and while the strain of the effort which goes with a 
long summer's campaign must have had its effect upon him, no 
word escaped his lips except that of his own conviction that the 
club would rise supreme to the task set for it before the year was 
ended. 

And so, while Chicago did not win the championship and the 
right to fly another pennant, it is impossible to withhold from 
the captain of the team and his players that sincere commendation 
which their efforts merited. The team was a credit to its league 
and a credit to its city, as it had been in the past. 

While there was no member of the organization but deserves 
praise for the part which each as an individual took in the task 
of trying to win in the race, it is not unfair to bestow especially 
on Mordecai Brown, the club's leading pitcher, a few words' of 
esteem for his hard work, willingness, modesty and excellent 
service in behalf of his club. His loyalty to the organization to 
which he belongs is one of the finest traits of the professional 
Base Ball player. 

Chicago held the lead once. That was very early in the race 
in April. When it was crowded back by Pittsburg it never suc- 
ceeded in regaining the lost advantage, although now and then 
the Chicago players and their enthusiastic friends were confident 
that the time had come when they would reassert their supremacy. 
They failed to do so. but they lost no friends, because in their 
failure they demonstrated their spirit and courage, and those are 
two attributes which will recommend any organization of sport 
to the public that so quickly discriminates between real endeavor 
and pretense. 

The New York club finished third in the race 
The * n 1909, the position which Pittsburg held at 

TVpw Yorlc ttle finisn of tne season of 1908. That the 
Ini *J owner and manager of the team, as well as 

ClllD the players, would have preferred to do better 

hardly need be stated. 
New York began the season under conditions' which were per- 
haps a trifle harder than those which had attached themselves to 
Pittsburg and Chicago. The Pittsburgs needed a first baseman to 
round out their team. Chicago needed but to keep all of its old 
players in line. New York had to make changes of vital impor- 
tance in order that weak spots might be. filled if it were possible 
to do so. 

McGraw. the manager of the team, a keen observer of ball 
players and probably without an equal as a judge of Base Ball 
values, found at the end of the season of 1908 that if he were 
to hold his own and a little more than that in 1909 he must 
increase his run-getting strength. 

.He assumed that to place a better outfield in play in 1909 he 
would have a better chance to win the championship. To secure 
the players whom he desired and also to strengthen his pitching 
force, which he realized would have to be done, he was willing to 
venture a sacrifice behind the bat, and permitted Bresnahan, one 




1, Tinker; 2, Schulte; 3, Kane; 4, Archer; 5, Overall; 6, Evers. 

' Conlon, Photo. 

A GROUP OF CHICAGO NATIONALS, 1909. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 65 

of the best catchers of the National League, to go to another 
team to act as manager that he might get a promising outfielder 
and a pitcher with some known skill and an uncertain tem- 
perament. 

He tried the experiment, and while, with a mixture of young 
blood and old, he was able to keep his team up in the race after 
it had once struck its gait, he was not able to push it to the 
front as he had in the year previous. 

All things considered, the New York Base Ball club made a 
gallant effort to duplicate its success of 1908 and to try to im- 
prove on it, but between an unfortunate combination of circum- 
stances at the very outset of the year, and failure to realize as 
strongly on its batting strength as had been hoped for, it was 
less successful than in the preceding season. 

No blow was more vitally disastrous to the club than the illness 
of the manager at the very outset of the season. Not only was 
he unable to be present at the opening game, but for some time 
after it was played he was confined to his home by a severe 
attack of blood poisoning, the result of an injury to his finger, 
and was unable to take his place with the players. 

His absence counted severely against the chances* of his team, 
because it had been his ambition to be with it in the first three 
weeks, in order that he might guide its affairs after a successful 
training season in the South. Because of his inability to handle 
the players in the first fortnight of the year a poor start was 
made, and before the first month had elapsed the club was wholly 
on the defensive and losing games which might have been saved 
with different handling of the players. 

Another, serious blow to the early success of the New York team 
was an injury received by Mathewson, who was quite seriously 
hurt when a fellow player threw his bat to one side and acci- 
dentally struck the pitcher in the chest on the opening day of 
the season. 

It is true that Donlin's* refusal to accept the terms of the club 
deprived it of presumable excellent batting strength, but it is a 
well-known fact that it was the ambition of the New York manager 
to obtain at the outset a start which would inspire confidence in 
his younger players, and failure to do that handicapped the team 
severely before it found itself. 

The fact that when the players did begin to act in concert and 
evince some of the team-work which occasionally gained them the 
highest commendation throughout the circuit of the National 
League ; and that they played such excellent ball at times that 
they almost looked as if they might overthrow the leaders in the 
race is the more to their credit, for they gave themselves a long 
lift from near the foot of the ladder almost to the top. 

An interesting fact in connection with the work of the New 
York team for the season is that it played better Base Ball away 
from home than it did on its own field. If that is a criterion of 
courage and grit, as some have stated, New York exhibited its 
full allotment during the year. 

As was the case in the Chicago club, there was a pitcher 
in the New York club — Mathewson — who freely and cour- 
ageously gave his services to the success of the club whenever 
he could be of assistance to its welfare. In his long term of 
years in New York he has established national fame for himself, 
and his career is one of the finest chapters in Base Ball history. 
In many respects he never pitched better in his life than in 1909, 
and strangely enough was twice the victim of injuries on the 
field, which had not happened to him before during his many 
years in Base Ball, and unfortunately enough for the New York 




1, Chance; 2, Zimmerman; 3, Ragon; 4, Moran; 5, Sheckard 



A GROUP OF CHICAGO NATIONALS, l^ 10 *' ^^ 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 67 

team on both occasions he was injured when his club needed his 
services badly. 

Though New York could not win the championship, it was the 
opinion of Base Ball writers in many cities' that New York was 
the team which defeated Chicago's pennant aspirations, for the 
Eastern club encountered Chicago on the grounds of the latter 
when it was sweeping along with the old dash and success of 
previous years and routed the champions so severely that they 
never regained their lost prestige. 

Clark Griffith made his advent into the 

The National League for the first time as a man- 

Cincinnati a ger by taking charge of the Cincinnati club. 

Si u Jt was no easy task to P icl * U P tne Cincinnati 

Club club, in view of the failures which had been 

recorded, and try to bring it out of the rut 

in which it had traveled for so long. 

Yet Griffith, with a nine of comparatively young players, suc- 
ceeded in finishing in the first division and, more than some had 
been able to do before him, inspired Cincinnati Base Ball en- 
thusiasts with the notion that perhaps a good manager who was 
permitted to guide a team at his own discretion was too valuable 
to be criticised. 

There was a great deal of uncertainty about the Cincinnati 
team when Griffith took hold of it. Many of the players' were 
barely out of their minor league knickerbockers. Some of them 
were headstrong and over-assertive. His pitching strength was a 
problem, and he had but one catcher, McLean, upon whom he 
could rely, and was unfortunate enough to have that catcher 
injured before the season was over. 

From the material that he had he practically constructed a new 
infield. He changed tbe outfield and he coached his pitchers until, 
if not of the same state of efficiency as those of some of the 
stronger clubs of the league, they were far more competent than 
when they first reported to Cincinnati. 

He did not promise that he would bring Cincinnati through in 
the first division, but he did. More than that, for a greater part 
of the season he had the team in the first division, which is by 
no means a bad showing — in fact, a very excellent showing when 
all the conditions of his advent into the National League in 1909 
are considered. Not only did he begin the Base Ball year with 
players who were new to him, but he was expected to make a 
campaign against clubs and leaders of clubs who were strangers 
to him, on account of the time which had elapsed from his shift 
into the American League from the National League. 

No acute perception is needed to classify 

The the Philadelphia club in the class of disap- 

PhilaaVlnhm pointing possibilities. No team in the National 

Jii k League more thoroughly discouraged its owners 

CIUD and supporters by the showing which it made 

in the race. 

Before the championship season began not a few predicted that 

the Philadelphias would be championship contenders. After the 

season had progressed but long enough to observe the actions of 

the men on the field opinions were freely expressed that the 

Philadelphias were the same team of old, not one whit improved 




1, Howard; 2, Hofman; 3, Brown; 4, Steinfeldt; 5, Kroh. 
A GROUP OF CHICAGO NATIONALS, 1909. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 68* 

by experience or by the admonitions of those who were vitally 
interested in their welfare. 

What they might have been no one knows, but it seems within 
the bounds of reason that their general caliber individually was' 
too great to have produced such a sorry campaign. 

Brooklyn was not a success nor was it 

The wholly a team which gave satisfaction in its 

Rrnnklvn general scheme of play. Individually there 

Irn i» was strength to the organization. Certainly 

ClUD there were players who were coveted by other 

managers, and are still coveted by them, but 

as a team there was little in Brooklyn to commend. 

Lack of managerial force very likely had something to do with 
the lackadaisical efforts of the players. It was the first year in 
which Harry Lumley had essayed to act as manager He was not 
keenly anxious to assume the position, but it was tendered to him 
by the owners of the club in such a way that he felt it his duty 
to accept it and try to do the best that he could. 

The progress of the months' developed the fact that Lumley r 
with his lack of experience as manager, was £lso devoid of the 
magnetic and aggressive personality which is essential in a leader 
of men. It was not necessary that he should be pugnacious or 
stubborn in his methods of discipline and generalship, but Brook- 
lyn needed a man of action to awaken the players from their 
lethargy. 

For two or three seasons the team had been sleeping when it 
should have been wide awake, and Lumley was hardly of the type- 
to ring the alarm clock loudly enough to arouse the sleepers from 
their drowsiness. 

There were many times throughout the season when Brooklyn, 
as a team of individuals, gave indications of real Base Ball 
ability, and there were other times, altogether too frequent, when 
a lack of strategy on the part of the team handicapped the- 
players to the extent that they lost games which they should 
easily have won. 

St. Louis experienced a real awakening 

The when Roger Bresnahan took hold of the team 

m "f^ufc as manager. The disposition of the playing 

r«i k executive of the team was quite spirited 

ClUD enough to give the organization a real stirring 

up from top to bottom. 

That was largely what St. Louis needed. Under former managers 

the club had gone along with some good and some moderately 

good players, and had never quite realized the expectations of the 

owner and probably of the manager. 

To obtain the services of Bresnahan it was necessary for the 
St. Louis management to part with valuable material, yet the new 
manager, nothing daunted by the changes which had been made, 
rallied his forces, inspired them with some of his own energy, and 
started on a campaign which, for a time, swept the city. 

Later in the season his team lagged. Then the vials of criticism 
were uncorked and their contents were strewn over the manager. 
That was hardly fair, in view of the fact that the St. Louis team, 
like any organization which was largely experimental and like 
all teams of young players who start with a rush, simply reverted 
to its own speed as the climax came in the race. 




1. McGraw: 2. Mathewson: 3. Doyle: 4. Murray; 5. Wiltse. 

Conlon, Photo. 

A GROUP OF NEW YORK NATIONALS. 1909. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 71 

Had St. Louis possessed the right proportion of seasoned players 
and not been compelled in the exigencies of the campaign to' try 
out new material for a succeeding season before the present was 
concluded, it is probable that the nine would have finished better 
and would have made a more creditable general showing than 
it did. 

One quality of the club must not be overlooked. It was one of 
its best traits and one of the grandest attributes in Base Ball — ■ 
the players were always working with might and main to win. 
Even when the score was against them, and they were contending 
against teams which were essentially stronger, the St. Louis 
players would not give up. trusting that some change in the 
game — and changes come with the swiftness of the lightning in 
Base Ball — might give them the opportunity which they needed 
to defeat their rivals. 

The Boston team was a victim of a succes- 

Xlie & i° n °f deplorable circumstances. The wisdom 

Ronton °^ the owner s selection as manager was a 

ri u questionable quantity before the year had 

ClUD barely started. The break which arose betwe-n 

the manager and the players became so serious 

that it was deemed advisable to permit the manager to relinquish 

his task. 

Prior to this, however, the owner of the club. George B. Dovey. 
a splendid character in Base Ball, expired while traveling between 
Pittsburg and Cincinnati. This sad calamity of itself would be 
enough to upset the strongest team, and with other afflictions 
which Boston was compelled to bear it is probably no wonder that 
the club finished last in the race. 

A new manager was appointed and the affairs of the club were 
conducted by the brother of the former owner. Another blow to 
the success of the team was the gradual retrogression of some of 
the older players, whose ability decreased so materially that before 
the year was over it was felt necessary to permit them to go 
elsewhere. 

In the early part of the year the team made an exceptional 
showing for a * matter of a few days. . It was quite freely asserted 
at that time that the players seemed to be going a little beyond 
their speed, and when they began to feel the severity of the Base 
Ball battle as the weather grew warmer and the nines with 
marked skill played more up to their own speed. Boston fell back. 
and it was then that a lack of managerial diplomacy assisted in 
the downfall of the organization. The manager hastened the poor 
work of his players by sharp criticism rather than encouraging 
them by words of kindly advice. 




1, Wilson; 2, Fletcher; 3, Ames; 4, Bridwell; 5, Myers. 

Conlon, Photo. 
A GROUP OF NEW YORK NATIONALS. 1909. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 13 

The National League Championship 
Campaign of 1909 

By John B. Foster. 

Owing to the fact that the Pittsburg club led in the race for 
most of the year, the story of the campaign must necessarily deal 
with the efforts of the Pittsburgs to elude their pursuers after 
they had taken the lead. 

It follows, too, that a championship contest of this character 
is more likely to be devoid of the picturesque and the interest- 
ingly disquieting, than that in which the leadership shifts from 
one^club to another during the months in which teams stake their 
athletic efficiency on the field of sport. 

The season began on April 14. In the first fortnight of the 
race, as is so often the case, those teams which were very unlikely 
pennant factors but good spring starters assumed the lead and 
vacillated in holding it for a certain length of time. 

For example, during April Boston was first in the race ; so, 
also, was Cincinnati, yet neither of the organizations was to be 
seriously reckoned with as a pennant contender. At the very last 
day of the month of April Chicago was in front and within the 
next week Philadelphia and Boston were tied for first place. On 
May 4 Philadelphia was in the lead, and that was the last of the 
Phi]adelphia boom. 

Pittsburg forged to the front on May 5. From that day until 
the end of the race Pittsburg was always in front. In June, July, 
August, September and October the Pittsburg players, whether 
closely pursued or with a wide gap between them and the nearest 
team, were always the leaders. The more wonder, therefore, that 
the contest for the National League pennant attracted the wide- 
spread attention which it did. 

The last two weeks in April told nothing of the story which 
was to follow. Boston was playing above its speed in the East, 
Philadelphia better than it played as the season progressed, and 
the New York players far below their possibilities. 

In the West Cincinnati was winning more games than had been 
predicted for the team, although it is not so certain that the 
team was playing better than it should have played with the 
material at hand. Pittsburg had a bad fortnight and Chicago was 
uneven and erratic. St. Louis was playing as determinedly as 
any of the Western four and the perseverance of the players and 
manager went far toward atoning for the general weakness of 
the team. 

When Pittsburg assumed first place in the league race it was 
conceded by neither the New York nor the Chicago partisans' that 
the players under the leadership of Clarke could possibly hold it 
more than a month. There were some who predicted that Pitts- 
burg would drop back before the Fourth of July, and so far back 
that the team would drop out of the race for the pennant at the 
same time. 

Pittsburg refused to take a step backward and the players, once 
first place was theirs, could not be shaken from their grip at the 
top of the championship ladder. 

As glorious as was their fight, and as enduring as was their 
struggle against the other seven, they practically eliminated them- 
selves from the race in general. There were no ups and downs 
with them. It was all "up." They never dropped back to second 
place or to third place with sinking hearts. There was no time 




1, Schlei; 2, Tenney; 3, Marquardt; 4, Seymour. 

Conlon, Photo. 
A GROUP OF NEW YORK NATIONALS, 1909. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 75 

that they entered into a same feeling that they must recover that 
which they had lost, because the tenacity of their hold on that 
which they had earned could not be broken. 

Hence it is as well to say of Pittsburg, now that the smooth- 
ness of its team work, the general ability of its players, a tine 
display of batting strength and, all in all, sufficient freedom from 
accident to its members that it continued uninterruptedly with 
the organization through the remainder of the year, until it had 
earned the championship beyond doubt in the latter part of Sep- 
tember. The nearest approach to a real fright for the Pittsburg 
enthusiasts was an injury to Wagner toward the middle of the 
season, which compelled his retirement for a few days. It was 
magnified into a positive scare by the Pittsburg correspondents, 
and at the time that this wonderful player was hurt it was re- 
ported that he might never take part in another game for the 
team. That was a gross misstatement of fact, in consonance 
with other unreliable stories which, from time to time, have 
emanated from sources in Pittsburg that appear to live on the 
credulity of the public outside of that city. 

No doubt there were times' when the Pittsburg players may 
have worried a trifle, for there were times when more than a 
single defeat broke against them. However, inasmuch as the team 
was in the lead from May 5 until the end of the year, its story 
was only a repetition of success from week to week, and there it 
rests on its* laurels. 

Not so smooth was the path of the other seven clubs. During 
the early part of May the Philadelphia players were second in the 
race. Their pitchers were working well and their batters were 
finding the ball. Within a week, seemingly, all was changed. 
Philadelphia had gone back to the style of 1908. The reason for 
such a sudden alteration never has been quite ascertained, but the 
relapse was in evidence. 

The Chicago players, floundering around a little without the 
services of their regular second baseman and catcher, had managed 
to pull into second place by winning with some show of regularity. 

Boston had dropped hopelessly out of the race. Cincinnati had 
found its place — fourth — and, no matter what happened to the 
team during the remainder of the year, sooner or later Cincinnati 
would return to fourth place. Brooklyn and St. Louis were 
anchored in the second division and the New York team, upon 
which much had been built, was a bad seventh. With no manager 
and with Mathewson out of the game for practically a month, 
the Giants were more than 200 points lower in percentage than 
they had expected to be at this stage. In May the final reverse 
came to the Bostons. On the 18th day of that month they fell 
into eighth place and never again emerged from their lowly estate 
during the season, so that, while Pittsburg pushed its way through 
the billows as the bow of the National League craft from that 
time until the end of the race, the Boston players tagged patiently 
along as the stern, and the Base Ball enthusiasts from then on 
read each day : "Pittsburg first, Boston last." 

In the last fifteen days of the month of May, the most impor- 
tant feature of the race was the upward trend of the New York 
team. McGraw was back, recovered from his illness and in charge 
of the players. Mathewson had recovered from the injury which 
he had received on the first day of the season and was pitching 
with greater skill, if anything, than he had manifested in the 
previous year. The team was handicapped by an unsettled and 
not wholly satisfactory outfield, but watched by McGraw and 
showing less tendencv to be unsettled, as had been the case when 
he was away from the bench, the players pushed ahead until they 




1, Devlin; 2, Raymond; 3, Snodgrass; 4, Merkle; 5, Crandall. 
A GROUP OF NEW YORK NATIONALS, 1909. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 77 

were in third place on May 31. Beginning from then until the 
end of the year the New York players were mostly in third place. 
Occasionally they dropped back tcT fourth, and now and then had 
an interesting running fight with the Cincinnati team for prefer- 
ment in third place, but the New York team was so much stronger 
than that of Cincinnati that it was expected the Eastern players 
would ultimately secure the higher position, and they did. 

The battle through May and June was largely a continuation 
of that which had preceded. There was nothing sensational to it. 
nothing extraordinary, but as a rule hard fought Base Ball in 
which the club in the lead was compelled to put its best efforts 
to the front every afternoon. 

At the middle of the season, July 1, the places in the race were 
filled as follows : Pittsburg, Chicago, New York, Cincinnati. Phila- 
delphia, Brooklyn, St. Louis and Boston. Strangely prophetic ! It 
was the exact order in which the teams completed the race in 
October. 

How many were there who, when they perused the standing of 
the National League clubs on the morning of July 1, three days 
before the Fourth of July, realized that they were looking upon 
the standing of the National League race as it would be recorded 
when bats had been laid aside in the major leagues and the 
minors, and all attention was being devoted to the winning of the 
World's Championship ? It was remarkable in a way that the 
mid-season standing and the final standing should be identical to 
a place. Base Ball races may be run for a hundred years to come, 
and even more, and such a coincidence never result again. 

While the Chicagos were making their early trip to the East it 
was ascertained that the shoulder of Frank Chance, their first 
baseman and manager, had been broken. This compelled his with- 
drawal from the field for a time and undoubtedly affected the 
chances of the team. 

When it comes to a question of injuries, all teams which are 
strictly pennant contenders may be said to suffer alike, and what- 
ever handicap may have been placed on Chicago by the injury to 
Chance was offset, so far as New Y^ork was concerned, by the 
injuries to McGraw. Mathewson, Doyle and Seymour. 

Any important club which has a player of reputation hurt so 
that he is compelled to withdraw from the game, is handicapped 
to the extent that he is of value to his team. 

It must not be taken for granted that because Pittsburg assumed 
an early lead in the race it was never in danger of losing its 
place. Quite the reverse. There were times when both Chicago 
and New Y'ork threatened Pittsburg, and seriously, too. Pittsburg's 
strength, however, presented such an unyielding front that it won 
when it was hardest pressed and occasionally crept away from its 
bitterest rivals, so that it possessed a little reserve upon which 
to call when the reserve was needed. 

With the season approaching the midway Pittsburg effected a 
trade with St. Louis by which Barbeau, who had been playing third 
base for the Pittsburg team, was exchanged to the St. Louis club 
for Byrne and Storke. 

At the time that the exchange was made it was doubted by 
some of the Pittsburg theorists as to whether Clarke had made a 
good move. Subsequent events proved the correctness of his judg- 
ment, for if Byrne was no more effective than Barbeau, it is 
certain that his experience made him a more valuable man for the 
Pittsburg club, in view of the fact that Pittsburg had come to be 
an accepted championship factor, and was being looked forward to 
as a possible contender for the World's Championship. This after- 
ward resulted. 




1. Hugsins; 2, McLe 8 n; 3, Clark Griffith Mgr.; 4, GaspenJ., Eg"; 
A GRO0P OF CINCINNATI PLAYERS, 1909. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 79 

So far as inter-club games were concerned, there were few times 
that both. New York and Chicago did not make the fight trouble- 
some for Pittsburg. New York repeatedly had the coming cham- 
pions on the anxious seat, but while New York was a menace to 
Pittsburg it was a positive fright to Chicago, and it was largely 
through the triumphs of the New York team over Chicago that 
Pittsburg was able to win the championship. 

The last visit of the New York players to Chicago was the 
culmination of the series of downfalls which New York brought 
all the year to the champions. Chicago was both beaten and 
routed byr New York and virtually blotted from the championship 
race by the team which had been beaten the year before by 
Chicago in a game which the New York players felt that they 
had been unjustly compelled to play. 

There was one day in August when the St. Louis team displaced 
Philadelphia from fifth place. It was the highest point which * 
was attained by St. Louis in the race and is worthy of recognition 
in this review of the year. St. Louis Base Ball enthusiasts were 
carried away by the good showing of the team and had the Cardi- 
nals been able to maintain the speed which they were evincing 
at that time until the end of the contest they would have been 
one of the most popular clubs to play in St. Louis since the time 
that the championship was won by Comiskey. But they lost their 
position almost as soon as they had gained it, and from that time 
on were never quite as aggressive nor so dangerous as they had 
been in the earlier part of the race. In part this may be attrib- 
uted to the fact that they began to try out new players for the 
season to come, and there is very little to be expected from a club 
when the management is busy with new material. 

The closing stages of the championship contest brought forth 
a little excitement. Chicago was close on the heels of Pittsburg, 
as close as the team could get after the fine rally which it had 
made, the effectual stop which had been placed on it by New 
York, and a subsequent effort to regain lost ground, which showed 
that the Chicagos were deeply concerned in winning the pennant 
for the fourth time in succession, if they were strong enough to 
do so. Had Pittsburg faltered in the last fortnight there could 
have been an opportunity for Chicago to win the championship 
from them in the last series which was played on the Chicago 
grounds'. The number of postponed games made that much within 
human achievement. But Pittsburg did not and would not falter. 
With the end of the season so near at hand and the story of the 
previous year still fresh in their minds, the Pittsburg players 
hung gallantly to their task and when they faced Chicago for the 
last time it was* without the possibility that Chicago could win 
the championship. The title had already passed into the keeping 
of the team that had asserted its right to it within the first 
week of May. 

The final Eastern visitation of the New York team to Chicago 
was the most galling of all the year to the champions. Five games' 
were scheduled to be played. Of these the Giants won three, tied 
one and lost one. That ended Chicago's greatness. 

On September 28 the contest was settled. While the New York 
players' were defeating Pittsburg in Pittsburg, Philadelphia was 
defeating Chicago in Chicago, and when the Chicago players walked 
from the ground at the end of the game it was without joy, even 
though Pittsburg had been beaten, for in their own defeat Pitts- 
burg negatively had won the title for which the National League 
members had been striving with such zeal. 

It has hardly seemed necessary to follow this National League 
race with the close detail which would be expected if there had 




1, Bescher; 2, Charles; 3, Rowan; 4. Fromme; 5, Paskert. 

Conlon, Photo. 
A GROUP OF CINCINNATI PLAYERS, 1909. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



81 



been remarkable and frequent fluctuations' in standing all the year. 

It is by no means difficult to perceive that the three teams which 
finished in the first three places were the three strongest teams 
of the organization. Had Pittsburg been less strong or less per- 
sistent the race would have been increased in excitement, as there 
was variation in standing on the part of the clubs which com- 
posed it. 

As a matter of fact it was a three-club race from the start 
barring the fact that the New York team did not start as well 
as had been expected. Had the New York players been working 
as effectively in the early part of the year as they were in the 
latter part, and had Reulbach, the Chicago pitcher, acquired com- 
mand of the ball in the early part of the season instead of in the 
middle of the season, it is probable there would have ben a con- 
test between Pittsburg, New York and Chicago, with the other 
five clubs playing their parts as best they could against the con- 
tenders, which would have been even more thrilling than that 
of 1908. 

A prominent manager of the National League said at the close 
of the season that New York was playing better than Pittsburg, 
but too late to be of any advantage to New York, however much 
it might be of advantage to Pittsburg, because New York, strong 
as it was then, was an obstacle which Chicago could not overcome. 
Such was the case. 

Every championship race is fraught with "might have beens." 
These in no way detract from the honor which should be bestowed 
upon the winner. 

Pittsburg, with its close fight for the championship in 1908. 
was groomed to the minute for the contest for 1909. Its weak 
spots had been strengthened, its leader guided its policy dis- 
creetly, never trusting too long to pitchers whom he feared might 
weaken in view of the fact that he possessed a team of batters 
who could make runs. It was not a victim of serious accidents 
and it rounded up the league race with practically the same 
quality of Base Ball as that which it had played from May 5. 

If there is one quality more than another which should be 
ascribed to Pittsburg for its work in 1909, I should say "con- 
sistency" — and consistency is a jewel. 



NATIONAL LEAGUE SEMI-MONTHLY STANDING. 



Club. 

Chicago 

Boston 

Philadelphia 
Cincinnati . , 



PERCENTAGE STANDING APRIL 
Won. Lost. PC. I Club. 

8 5 - 615 Pittsburg 

6 4 .600 New York 

6 -600 1 Brooklyn 

8 7 .533!st. Louis 



Won. Lost. 
. 6 6 

. 4 6 



Club. 



PERCENTAGE STANDING MAY 15. 



Won. Lost. PC. 



Pittsburg 16 

Chicago 15 

Philadelphia 12 

Cincinnati 14 



9 


.640 


12 


.556 


10 


.545 


14 


.500 



PERCENTAGE STANDING MAY 31. 



Club. Won. Lost. PC. 

Pittsburg 26 12 .684 

Chicago 24 16 .600 

New York 17 17 .500 

Philadelphia 17 17 .500 



PC. 

.500 
.400 
.400 
.357 



Club. Won. Lost. PC. 

Boston 11 12 .478 

Brooklyn 11 12 .478 

New York 9 3 3 .409 

St. Louis 11 17 .393 



Club. Won. Lost. PC. 

Cincinnati 19 21 .475 

Brooklyn 16 18 .471 

St. Louis 17 33 .425 

Boston 12 24 .333 




1, Doom (capt., 1910) 2, Knabe; 3, Coveleskie; 4, Moore. 

Richter, Photo. 
A GROUP OF PHILADELPHIA NATIONALS, 1909. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



83 



PERCENTAGE STANDING JUNE 15. 



Club. Won. Lost. PC. 

Pittsburg 35 12 .745 

Chicago 31 18 .633 

Cincinnati 27 23 .540 

New York 23 20 .535 



Club. Won. Lost. 

Philadelphia 21 23 

St. Louis 19 30 

Brooklyn 17 19 

Boston 13 31 



PERCENTAGE STANDING JUNE 30. 



Club. Won. Lost. 

Pittsburg 14 15 



Chicago 
New York 
Cincinnati 



PC. 

.746 
.633 
.589 



Club. Won. Lost. 

Philadelphia 27 31 

St. Louis 24 35 

Brooklyn 21 38 



.525'Boston 16 



PERCENTAGE STANDING JULY 15. 



Won. Lost. PC. 

55 21 .724 

48 26 .649 

New York 44 28 .611 

Cincinnati 40 37 .519 



Club. 
Pittsburg 
Chicago 



Club. Won. 

Philadelphia 33 

St. Louis 30 

Brooklyn 27 

Boston 22 



42 



PERCENTAGE STANDING JULY 31. 



Club. 

Pittsburg 64 

Chicago 57 

New York 51 

Cincinnati 45 



Won. Lost. PCI Club. Won. Lost. 

25 .719 Philadelphia 40 48 

30 .655 St. Louis 37 49 

35 .593|Brooklvn 32 56 

44 .506lBoston 25 64 



Club. 
Pittsburg . 
Chicago . . . 
New York 
Cincinnati 



PERCENTAGE STANDING AUGUST 15. 

Won. Lost. PC] Club. Won. Lost. 

73 29 .716 Philadelphia 47 55 

68 35 .660 St. Louis 43 57 

38 .616Brooklyn 37 65 

50 .SIS'Boston 26 79 



61 
53 



PC. 

.427 
.388 
.378 
.295 



PC. 

.466 



.356 
.276 



PC. 

.440 
.411 
355 
.293 



PC. 

.455 
.430 
.364 
.281 



PC. 

.461 
.430 
.363 
.248 



PERCENTAGE STANDING AUGUST 31. 



Club. Won. Lost. 

Pittsburg •. 86 32 

Chicago 79 38 

New York 69 46 

Cincinnati 59 56 



PC 



Club. Won. Lost. 

729|Philadelphia 56 61 

675 St. Louis :. 45 72 

600 Brooklyn 41 76 

513iBoston 32 86 



PERCENTAGE STANDING SEPTEMBER 13. 



Club. Won. Lost. PC. 

Pittsburg 96 36 .727 

Chicago 91 42 .684 

New York 77 50 .597 

Cincinnati 66 66 .500 



Club. Won. Lost. 

Philadelphia 65 70 

St. Louis 47 S3 

Brooklyn 47 85 

Boston 38 93 



PERCENTAGE STANDING SEPTEMBER 30. 



Club. 

Pittsburg 

Chicago 99 47 

New York 89 57 

Cincinnati 75 72 



Won. Lost. PC. Club. 
107 40 .728 Philadelphia 



Won. Lost. 
.... 70 76 

.678(St. Louis 51 93 

.640J Brooklyn 51 94 

.510 Boston 41 104 



CHAMPIONSHIP PERCENTAGE STANDING. 



Club. Won. Lost. 
Pittsburg 110 42 



Chicago 104 

New York 92 

Cincinnati 77 



61 
76 



PC. 

.724 
.680 
.601 
.504 



Club. Won. Lost. 

Philadelphia 74 79 

Brooklyn 55 98 

St. Louis 54 98 

Boston 45 108 



PC. 



.350 
.271 



PC. 

.481 
.362 
.356 
.290 



PC. 

.479 
354 



PC. 

.484 
.350 
.355 
.294 




1, Jennings; 2, Donovan; o, Summers; 4, Crawford; o, Works. 

YanOeyen, Photo. 

A GROUP OF DETROIT PLAYERS, 1909. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL, BASE BALL GUIDE. 85 

American League Season of 1909 

By Irving E. Sanborn, Chicago. 

The year 1909, which was the tenth season of the American 
League's existence under that broad and patriotic surname, was 
remarkable chiefly for the wonderful proofs of material progress 
exhibited by the lusty young organization ; for the swift changes 
made in the management of its teams and for the fact that for the 
first time in six seasons the patrons of the American League games 
were not kept on the verge of insanity by pennant races which 
were not decided until almost time to start the World's Series. 

Two clubs, Philadelphia and St. Louis, christened great plants of 
steel and concrete at the beginning of the season of 1909, and two 
other clubs, Chicago and Cleveland, started during the year plans 
for the erection for this season of similar permanent and mam- 
moth structures for the entertainment and accommodation of their 
supporters. Boston now plans to follow suit in 1911. In addition, 
minor improvements and enlargements were made in several other 
cities' of the circuit to accommodate patronage. To this progressive 
policy was due the fact that the aggregate attendance at the Amer- 
ican League games was greater than in any previous year of its 
uncommon career, despite the fact its race was not so close as the 
phenomenal ones that have preceded it recently, and consequently 
interest was not maintained at fever heat until the very last day 
of the race. 

Three of the clubs started the season with other leaders on the 
field than those under whom they began the previous pennant race. 
One manager was replaced during the season and at its finish four 
club owners made shifts in their managements. Only Hugh Jen- 
nings of the Detroit champions and Connie Mack of the Athletics 
remain in the managerial positions which they occupied two years 
ago. In that time every other club has made at least one change 
and some of them two shifts of diamond leaders. 

These rapid changes have been in line with the American League's 
constant search for the best in all 'departments of the game ; to 
provide better entertainment on the ball field and better accommo- 
dation and comfort for the spectators. But the changes of a single 
year shrink into comparative insignificance in the light of the trans- 
formation which has gone on in the American League in a decade. 

Ten years ago this las